Victoza® Receives FDA Approval To Reduce Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Todd Hobbs, MD Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Novo Nordisk North America

Dr. Hobbs

Todd Hobbs, MD
Vice President and Chief Medical Officer
Novo Nordisk North America 

MedicalResearch.com: Would you tell us a little about liraglutide? How does it work to control diabetes/blood sugar? 

Response: Victoza® (liraglutide) is a human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog that was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010 to help lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. Victoza® is the #1 prescribed (GLP-1) receptor agonist.

Victoza® is a non-insulin, once-a-day medication that helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes by increasing glucose-dependent insulin release, inhibiting glucagon secretion, and slowing gastric emptying.

On August 25, the FDA approved a new indication for Victoza®, making it the only type 2 diabetes treatment approved to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular (CV) events, heart attack, stroke and CV death, in adults with type 2 diabetes and established CV disease.

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Progressive Incremental Benefits of Targeting Lower HbA1c on Type 2 Diabetes Complications Rates

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Samiul Mostafa

Dr. Samiul Mostafa

Dr. Samiul Mostafa
Honorary Clinical Lecturer
Diabetes Trials Unit
University of Oxford

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?
Response: In managing people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), international guidelines recommend individualisation of HbA1c (glucose) targets for long term maintenance; however, few data are available on the potential
benefits that different blood sugar control targets might achieve.

Therefore, there is a need to learn more about the incremental benefits
of progressively lowering blood sugar levels.
In this computer modelling study, we used the UKPDS Outcomes Model
version 2.0 to estimate 10-year event rates for myocardial infarction
(MI, heart attack), stroke, blindness and amputation by entering
baseline risk factor variables (for example, weight, height,
LDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure) taken from a for a current
population of 5766 people with T2DM. Complication rates were estimated
with HbA1c levels held constant at 10%, 9%, 8%, 7% and 6% for each
individual whilst maintaining their risk factors at their baseline
values. Standard statistical methods were used to calculate relative
risk reductions of complications at each HbA1c level.

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