Young Eyes Should Be Protected From UV Light

Louis R. Pasquale, MD Channing Division of Network Medicine Department of Ophthalmology Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Boston, MassachusettsMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Louis R. Pasquale, MD
Channing Division of Network Medicine
Department of Ophthalmology
Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
Boston, Massachusetts

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Pasquale: We found that more time spent outdoors in summer was associated with increased risk of exfoliation syndrome.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Pasquale: The eye is a seeing organ but is is also vulnerable to climatic elements. Protection from reflected UV rays during young adulthood could contribute to better ocular health in the elder years.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Pasquale: A gene for exfoliation syndrome has been identified called LOXL1. A specific polymorphism in LOXL1 is found in 99% of exfoliation syndrome cases and 80% of controls.  Why do 80% of people with the polymorphism NOT get the disease?  It will be important to determine if increased ocular UV exposure modifies the relation between LOXL1 gene variants and the development of exfoliation syndrome.

Citation:
Pasquale LR, Jiwani AZ, Zehavi-Dorin T, et al. Solar Exposure and Residential Geographic History in Relation to Exfoliation Syndrome in the United States and Israel. JAMA Ophthalmol. Published online September 04, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.3326.