Stefanie N. Hinkle, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Caffeine in Pregnancy: Effects May Differ for Mothers and Offspring

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Stefanie N. Hinkle, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Hinkle

Stefanie N. Hinkle, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Biostatistics
Epidemiology and Informatics
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Over 80% of U.S. women of reproductive age consume caffeine daily.While most women decrease consumption after becoming pregnant, many continue to consume caffeine throughout pregnancy.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that pregnant women limit their caffeine consumption to <200 mg/d out of an abundance of caution due to potential associations with pregnancy loss and fetal growth restriction at higher intakes. There remains limited data on associations with maternal cardiometabolic outcomes in pregnancy.  MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?  

Response: We found that low and moderate caffeinated beverage intake early in second trimester within current guidelines of <200 mg/d were associated with a lower risk for gestational diabetes and a more favorable cardiometabolic profile compared to no consumption.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: These findings may be reassuring for pregnant women already consuming moderate levels of caffeine; however, they should be considered in the context of published data on associations with offspring health. For example, we previously found that caffeine consumption during pregnancy, even in amounts less than the recommended 200 mg per day, was associated with smaller neonatal anthropometric measurements. Therefore, it would not be prudent for women who are non-drinkers to initiate caffeinated beverage consumption for the purpose of lowering GDM risk and improving glucose metabolism.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: More research is needed to understand the mechanisms of the findings and if different sources of caffeinated beverages influence women’s metabolic health differently. 

None of the authors have any conflicts of interest. 

Citation:

Hinkle SN, Gleason JL, Yisahak SF, et al. Assessment of Caffeine Consumption and Maternal Cardiometabolic Pregnancy Complications. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(11):e2133401. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.33401

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Nov 9, 2021 @ 10:09 pm

 

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