How Many Calories Do You Add To Your Coffee or Tea?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ruopeng An, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Kinesiology and Community Health College of Applied Health Sciences University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, IL 61820

Dr. Ruopeng An

Ruopeng An, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health
College of Applied Health Sciences
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign, IL 61820

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Coffee and tea are among the most widely consumed beverages in U.S. adults.1,2 Unlike other popular beverages including alcohol and sugar-sweetened beverages that are typically consumed in isolation, many people prefer drinking coffee and tea with add-ins like sugar or cream. These add-in items are often dense in energy and fat but low in nutritional value. Drinking coffee and tea with add-ins on a regular basis might impact an individual’s daily energy/nutrient intake and diet quality.3 The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggests that “coffee, tea, and flavored waters also can be selected, but calories from cream, added sugars, and other additions should be accounted for within the eating pattern.”4

To our knowledge, no study has been conducted to assess consumption of coffee and tea with add-ins in relation to daily energy and nutrient intake at the population level. Bouchard et al. examined the association between coffee and tea consumption with add-ins and body weight status rather than energy/nutrient intake, and consumption was measured by a few frequency-related questions instead of a 24-hour dietary recall.5

The purpose of this study was to examine consumption of coffee and tea with add-ins (e.g., sugar, cream) in relation to energy, sugar, and fat intake among U.S. adults 18 years of age and above. Data came from 2001-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), comprising a nationally-representative (biennially) repeated cross-sectional sample of 13,185 and 6,215 adults who reported coffee and tea consumption in in-person 24-hour dietary recalls, respectively.

Continue reading

Moderate Caffeine Not Linked to Arrhythmias In Heart Disease Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Luis E. Rohde, MD, ScD Postgraduate Program in Health Science: Cardiology and Cardiovascular Sciences, Medical School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Cardiovascular Division, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre

Dr. Luis E. Rohde

Luis E. Rohde, MD, ScD
Postgraduate Program in Health Science: Cardiology and Cardiovascular Sciences, Medical School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul,
Cardiovascular Division, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Caffeine-rich beverages have been implicated as a common cause of several cardiac-related symptoms, such as palpitations, tachycardia, or irregular heartbeats.

Because of this “intuitive” assumption, counseling to reduce or avoid caffeine consumption is still widely recommended in clinical practice by most physicians for patients with any heart disease.
Continue reading

Moderate Coffee During Pregnancy Unlikely To Affect Child’s Development or IQ

Mark A. Klebanoff, MD Center for Perinatal Research The Research Institute Nationwide Children's Hospital

Dr. Klebanoff

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Mark A. Klebanoff, MD
Center for Perinatal Research
The Research Institute
Nationwide Children’s Hospital

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Klebanoff: Caffeine is among the substances most commonly consumed by pregnant women.  There are numerous sources of caffeine in the diet—regular (non-decaf) coffee, regular tea, many soft drinks, energy drinks, and some power bars. Even chocolate contains some caffeine.  It’s also included in some over the counter pain relievers, and in over the counter ‘keep awake’ pills such as No-Doz.  As a result of its wide availability, most pregnant women consume at least some caffeine.  In spite of over 30 years of research, whether moderate amounts of caffeine (up to 200 milligrams, the amount contained in about 2 normal-sized cups of coffee, per day) during pregnancy are harmful is uncertain.  However almost all previous research has been about events related to pregnancy, such as difficulty becoming pregnant, miscarriage, birth defects, and the size of the newborn.  Whether maternal caffeine use during pregnancy has an impact on things later in childhood, such as obesity and neurologic development, has hardly been studied.

We used a biomarker, measured in the mother’s blood during pregnancy, for caffeine use, and found that more caffeine use was not associated with the child’s body mass index at either 4 or 7 years of age, and that at blood levels of the marker that we saw in the vast majority, caffeine was not associated with the child’s IQ, nor with behavioral abnormalities at those ages.

Continue reading

Moderate Coffee Habit Associated With Lower Risk of Mortality

Ming Ding, MD, DSc Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Boston, MA

Dr. Ding

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ming Ding, MD, DSc

Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston, MA

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Response: Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed beverages worldwide. Previous studies showed coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, and Parkinson’s disease. However, the association between coffee consumption and risk of mortality remains uncertain. Some studies showed an inverse association between moderate coffee consumption and risk of mortality, and an inverse or null association between heavy coffee consumption and risk of mortality. However, some studies found heavy coffee consumption to be associated with higher risk of mortality.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Response: With 208,501 participants and 31,956 deaths in three large cohort studies, our results showed a non-linear association of coffee consumption with total mortality in the whole population. When restricting to never smokers, coffee consumption was associated with lower risk of total mortality, and mortality due to CVD, neurological diseases, and suicide. No association of coffee consumption with cancer mortality was found. The present study provides strong evidence that long-term coffee consumption is not associated with increased risk of mortality.

Continue reading

2-3 Cups of Coffee Daily Linked To Lower Odds Of Erectile Dysfunction

David S. Lopez, Dr.P.H., M.P.H. Assistant professor University of Texas Health School of Public HealthMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
David S. Lopez, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.

Assistant professor
University of Texas Health School of Public Health

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Lopez: Coffee, and its most studied component, caffeine, have been implicated in potential health benefits due to the rich sources of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds contained in this beverage.

Caffeine intake reduced the odds of prevalent erectile dysfunction, especially an intake equivalent to approximately 2-3 daily cups of coffee (170-375 mg/day). This reduction was also observed among overweight/obese and hypertensive men, but not among diabetic men. These associations are warranted to be investigated in prospective studies.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Lopez: Caffeine intake reduced the odds of prevalent erectile dysfunction, especially an intake equivalent to approximately 2-3 daily cups of coffee (170-375 mg/day). This reduction was also observed among overweight/obese and hypertensive men, but not among diabetic men. These associations are warranted to be investigated in prospective studies.

Continue reading

Coffee May Lower Melanoma Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Erikka Loftfield
Doctoral student at the Yale School of Public Health
Fellow at the National Cancer Institute

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Previous studies have reported conflicting results on the association between coffee drinking and melanoma. We sought to clarify this relationship using data from the large NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We followed over 400,000 retirees aged 50 to 71 years at study entry for an average of 10 years. Participants were asked to report typical coffee intake. During the course of follow-up nearly 3,000 cases of malignant melanoma occurred. In our study, we observed that individuals who reported the highest total coffee intake (4 cups/day) had about 20% lower risk of malignant melanoma compared with those who did not consume coffee.

Continue reading

Hot Flashes? Nightsweats? It May Be Your Caffeine….

Stephanie Faubion, M.D Director of the Women’s Health Clinic Mayo Clinic in RochesterMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Stephanie Faubion, M.D
Director of the Women’s Health Clinic
Mayo Clinic in Rochester

 

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Faubion: In this study that included over 1800 women, we found that caffeine intake was associated with more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women.
Continue reading

Coffee Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Dr. Frank B. Hu MD MPH PhD Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology From the Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MAMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Frank B. Hu MD MPH PhD
Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology
From the Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA

 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Hu: We found that people who increased the amount of coffee they drank each day by more than one cup over a four-year period had a 11% lower risk for type 2 diabetes than those who made no changes to their coffee consumption, but those who decreased their coffee consumption by more than a cup per day increased their type 2 diabetes risk by 17%.

Continue reading

Coffee Associated With Lower Risk of Death From Non-Viral Cirrhosis

Woon-Puay Koh (Associate Professor) Office of Clinical Sciences Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore 8 College Road Level 4 | Singapore 169857MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Woon-Puay Koh (Associate Professor)
Office of Clinical Sciences
Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore
8 College Road Level 4 | Singapore 169857

 

MedicalResearch.com:  What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: The main finding is that coffee intake was associated with a lower risk of death from cirrhosis, specifically for non-viral hepatitis related cirrhosis. Subjects who drank two or more cups per day had a 66% reduction in mortality risk, compared to non-daily coffee drinkers. However, coffee intake was not associated with viral hepatitis B related cirrhosis mortality.

Continue reading

Coffee: Caffeine Improves Microvascular Endothelial Function

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Masato Tsutsui, MD, PhD, FAHA
Professor and Chairman
Department of Pharmacology
Graduate School of Medicine
University of the Ryukyus
Okinawa 903-0215, Japan

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Tsutsui: A recent large prospective study reported that coffee consumption is associated with reduced mortality for cardiovascular disease (NEJM 2012).  However, its precise mechanisms remain to be clarified.  Our double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study demonstrated, for the first time, that caffeine contained in a cup of coffee ameliorates microvascular endothelial function in healthy individuals.  These findings may explain, at least in part, the association of coffee consumption with reduced mortality for cardiovascular disease.
Continue reading

Prostate Cancer: Coffee and Tea Association

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Janet L. Stanford, MPH, PhD Full Member, Research Professor Co-Head, Program in Prostate Cancer Research Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 1100 Fairview Ave. N. M4-B874 Seattle, WA 98109-1024Janet L. Stanford, MPH, PhD
Full Member, Research Professor
Co-Head, Program in Prostate Cancer Research
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
1100 Fairview Ave. N. M4-B874
Seattle, WA 98109-1024

 
MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Stanford: The main finding from our research is that one or more cups of coffee per day is associated with a 56% to 59% reduction in the risk of prostate cancer recurrence or progression in men diagnosed with this common disease.  In our cohort of prostate cancer patients, 61% reported drinking at least one cup of coffee per day, with 14% reporting drinking 4 or more cups per day.  The lower risk for prostate cancer recurrence/progression observed in coffee drinkers, however, was seen even for those who consumed only one cup per day, suggesting that even modest intake of coffee may offer health benefits for prostate cancer patients.
Continue reading

The Impact of Green Tea and Coffee Consumption on the Reduced Risk of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Yoshihiro Kokubo, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA, FESC

Department of Preventive Cardiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, 5-7-1, Fujishiro-dai, Suita, Osaka,

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Kokubo:  In this study, higher green tea (2 or more cups/day) and coffee (3 to
6 times/week, 1 or more cups/day) consumption were found to be
inversely associated with the incidences of cardiovascular disease and
stroke. Higher green tea (2 or more cups/day) or coffee (1 or more
cups/day) consumption reduced the risks of cardiovascular disease,
strokes, and its subtypes, especially in intracerebral hemorrhage (P
for interaction between green tea and coffee=0.04).
Continue reading