CABG Risk Greater For Women

Giovanni Filardo, PhD, MPH Director of Epidemiology,  Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas, TX The Bradley Family Endowed Chair in Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Baylor University Medical Center Director of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, The Heart Hospital Baylor, Plano, TX Research Associate Professor of Statistics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TXMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Giovanni Filardo, PhD, MPH
Director of Epidemiology,  Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas, TX
The Bradley Family Endowed Chair in Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Baylor University Medical Center
Director of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, The Heart Hospital Baylor, Plano, TX
Research Associate Professor of Statistics,
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Filardo: Studies examining outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) by gender and/or race show conflicting results.  It remains to be determined if, or how, gender and race are independent risk factors for CABG operative mortality.

Our findings suggest that women face a significantly greater risk of operative death that should be taken into account during the treatment decision-making process, but that race is not associated with CABG mortality and so should not be among the factors considered.

Citation:

Effect of Gender and Race on Operative Mortality after Isolated Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting
Pollock, Benjamin et al.
American Journal of Cardiology December 17, 2014

 

 

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