Enabling Angioplasty-Ready “Smart” Stents to Detect In-Stent Restenosis and Occlusion

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kenichi Takahata, Ph.D., P.Eng. Associate Professor Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Faculty of Applied Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Dr. Takahata

Kenichi Takahata, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Faculty of Applied Science
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C., Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this technology and study? 

Response: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of mortality globally. One of the most common and proven treatments for CVD is stenting. Millions of stents are implanted annually worldwide. However, the most common complication called in-stent restenosis, re-narrowing of stented arteries, still poses a significant risk to patients.

To address the current lack of diagnostic technology to detect restenosis at its early stage, we are developing “smart” stents equipped with microscale sensors and wireless interface to enable continuous monitoring of restenosis through the implanted stent. This electrically active stent functions as a radio-frequency wireless pressure transducer to track local hemodynamic changes upon a re-narrowing condition. We have reported a new smart stent that has been engineered to fulfill clinical needs for the implant, including its applicability to current stenting procedure and tools, while offering self-sensing and wireless communication functions upon implantation.

The stent here has been designed to function not only as a typical mechanical scaffold but also as an electrical inductor or antenna. To construct the device, the custom-designed implantable capacitive pressure sensor chip, which we developed using medical-grade stainless steel, are laser-microwelded on the inductive antenna stent, or “stentenna”, made of the same alloy. This forms a resonant circuit with the stentenna, whose resonant frequency represents the local blood pressure applied to the device and can be wirelessly interrogated using an external antenna placed on the skin.

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Bisexual Men Face Greater Risk of Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Billy A. Caceres, PhD, RN, AGPCNP-BC NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing New York, NY 10010

Dr. Caceres

Billy A. Caceres, PhD, RN, AGPCNP-BC
NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing
New York, NY 10010

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Although current evidence, primarily based on self-reported data, suggests gay and bisexual men report higher rates of cardiovascular risk factors (such as poor mental health and tobacco use) than heterosexual men, few studies have examined heart disease risk in this population. This study is one of the few studies to examine heart disease risk in gay and bisexual men using biological measures.

Using data from a nationally representative sample we identified higher rates of mental distress, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes among bisexual men compared to exclusively heterosexual men after adjusting for traditional risk factors (demographic characteristics, mental distress, and health behaviors). We also included men who identified as heterosexual but report a history of same-sex sexual behavior. Gay and heterosexual-identified men who have sex with men displayed similar risk profiles to exclusively heterosexual men.

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Individuals With Very High Levels of Lipoprotein(a) May Benefit Most From LDL(a)-Lowering Drugs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Stephen Burgess PhD Programme Leader at the Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit University of Cambridge

Dr. Burgess

Dr. Stephen Burgess PhD
Programme Leader at the Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit
University of Cambridge

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Lipoprotein(a) is a lipoprotein subclass, and an important biomarker for coronary heart disease. As a clinical biomarker, it has a similar story to LDL-cholesterol (“bad” cholesterol), in that it is thought to be a causal risk factor for coronary heart disease, and so is a potential target for drug development. However, while drugs that lower LDL-cholesterol, such as statins, have been successful in reducing coronary heart disease risk, drugs that lower lipoprotein(a) have not as yet been successful. New drugs are currently in development that specifically target lipoprotein(a) and can lower lipoprotein(a) concentrations by 80-90%. We performed this study to investigate whether these drugs are likely to be successful in reducing coronary heart disease risk.

We compared individuals with naturally-occurring genetic variants that predispose them to a higher or lower lifetime concentration of lipoprotein(a) as a way of mimicking a randomized controlled trial. This approach has previously been undertaken for other biomarkers, including LDL-cholesterol. We found that having 10mg/dL lower genetically-predicted concentration of lipoprotein(a) was associated with a 5.8% reduction in coronary heart disease risk.

However, associations between genetically-predicted LDL-cholesterol and coronary heart disease risk are quantitatively much stronger than the proportional effect of LDL-cholesterol lowering on coronary heart disease risk as estimated by statin trials. This is because differences in genetic variants reflect lifelong changes in LDL-cholesterol, whereas statin trials only lower LDL-cholesterol for a few years. Hence, using the ratio between the genetic and trial estimates for LDL-cholesterol, we estimate that lowering lipoprotein(a) by 10mg/dL in a short-term clinical trial would only reduce coronary heart disease risk by 2.7%. To obtain the same reduction in coronary heart disease risk of around 20% as observed in statin trials, lipoprotein(a) would have to be lowered by around 100mg/dL. This explains why previous trials of less specific and less potent lipoprotein(a)-lowering drugs have failed to demonstrate benefit.

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Stress Echocardiography vs Coronary CT To Evaluate Chest Pain in ER

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jeffrey M. Levsky, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Radiology Associate Professor, Department of Medicine (Cardiology) Albert Einstein College of Medicine Montefiore Medical Center 

Dr. Levsky

Jeffrey M. Levsky, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Radiology
Associate Professor, Department of Medicine (Cardiology)
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Montefiore Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Millions of Americans are evaluated each year for acute chest pain in the Emergency Department.  There are multiple modalities that can be used to triage these patients and there have only been a few studies comparing different imaging methods.

We chose to study Stress Echocardiography and Coronary CT Angiography, two exams that have not been compared directly in this population.  We found that Stress Echocardiography was able to discharge a higher proportion of patients in a shorter amount of time as compared to Coronary CTA.  Continue reading

Fewer Re-infarctions With hs Troponin To Assess Heart Attacks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Martin J Holzmann MD, PhD

Dr. Holzmann

Martin J Holzmann MD, PhD
Functional Area of Emergency Medicine
Department of Internal Medicine,
Solna, Karolinska Institutet
Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We wanted to investigate how the introduction of the new high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assay affected incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) use of coronary angiography, cardiac revascularizations, and prognosis in patients with myocardial infarction.

We found that the incidence of MI increased by approximately 5%, with no change in mortality, but with an 11% reduced risk of reinfarctions, and a small increase in coronary angiographies, and cardiac revascularizations by 16%, and 13%, respectively.  Continue reading

Red Meat Allergy Caused by Lone Star Tick Linked to Coronary Artery Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Lone Star Tick” by Katja Schulz is licensed under CC BY 2.0Jeffrey Wilson, MD, PhD

Research Fellow, Allergy & Immunology
University of Virginia 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) represents an oligosaccharide that is present in mammalian products and is the causal allergen in a syndrome of delayed red meat allergy (commonly called α-Gal syndrome). Sensitization to this allergen has been linked to tick bites, specifically the lone star tick in the United States.

Thus, sensitization to α-Gal (and the prevalence of subjects with symptomatic red meat allergy) is relatively common where the lone star tick is common, i.e- the southeast.

For a variety of reasons we hypothesized that specific immune sensitization (which relates to IgE antibody production) to α-Gal would be a risk factor for coronary artery disease. To address this possibility we measured IgE specific to α-Gal in 118 adults subjects from central Virginia who had undergone advanced cardiac imaging with a technique called intravascular ultrasound. Out of the cohort 26% of the subjects in the study had the sensitivity to α-Gal.

The main finding was that subjects with the IgE sensitization to α-Gal had greater amounts of atherosclerosis, as well as atherosclerotic plaques with more unstable characteristics. This association was significant when controlled for traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes and lipids levels.

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Tobacco Flavorings On Their Own May Cause Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“fathers day” by James Simkins is licensed under CC BY 2.0Jessica L. Fetterman, PhD

Assistant Professor of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: In our study, we studied endothelial cells, the cells that line the inside of the blood vessels. We collected endothelial cells from smokers both who use menthol and non-menthol cigarettes are impaired compared to non-smokers and we could make the non-smoker cells look like the endothelial cells of smokers by treating with menthol or eugenol (provides a clove spice-flavoring).

To test a wider variety of commonly used flavoring additives, we treated cultured (outside of the body in a dish) endothelial cells with some of the most commonly used flavoring additives in tobacco products and at different concentrations/doses. We then evaluated the effects of flavoring additives by looking at measures of cell death, oxidative stress, inflammation, and the ability of the cells to produce nitric oxide, a cardio-protective chemical made by endothelial cells that is lost when the cells become damaged.

We found that the flavoring additives used in tobacco products like e-cigarettes are toxic to the cells that line the blood vessels (endothelial cells). Our works suggests that the flavoring additives used in tobacco products may be harmful to the cardiovascular system.

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Children of Older Mothers More Susceptible to Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sandra T. Davidge, PhD, FCAHS Executive Director, Women and Children's Health Research Institute Canada Research Chair in Maternal and Perinatal Cardiovascular Health Professor, Depts. of Ob/Gyn and Physiology University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta Canada

Dr. Davidge

Sandra T. Davidge, PhD, FCAHS
Executive Director, Women and Children’s Health Research Institute
Canada Research Chair in Maternal and Perinatal Cardiovascular Health
Professor, Depts. of Ob/Gyn and Physiology
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta
Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This research contributes to the growing body of literature that developmental programming of adult onset cardiovascular disease originates in the womb.

Our study is among the first to discover that maternal age may be considered a ‘prenatal stress’ in certain circumstances.

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Work Stress Associated With Increase Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

atrial-fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation-
Wikipedia

Eleonor Fransson, PhD
Associate Professor in Epidemiology
Department of Natural Sciences and Biomedicine
School of Health and Welfare
JÖNKÖPING UNIVERSITY

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Atrial fibrillation is a very common heart rhythm disorder affecting a large number of people in the population, but there is limited knowledge about risk factors for the disease. This is especially true when it comes to the role of occupational factors.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: We found that work stress measured as job strain, that is, a combination of having high psychological job demands and low control over the work situation, was associated with almost 50% increased risk of atrial fibrillation. When we combined the results from our study with two previously published studies on the same topic, we found that work stress was associated with 37% increased risk.

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Obese Women Remain at Risk For Heart Disease, Even When Metabolically Healthy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Nathalie Eckel, MSc

German Diabetes Center
Düsseldorf, Germany 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

 Response: Obesity is associated with metabolic disorders such as diabetes, high blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia, and with a higher risk of cardiovacular disease compared to normal weight. However, there is also the phenomenon of the so-called “metabolically healthy obesity” and “metabolically unhealthy normal-weight”. So far it has been unclear how metabolic risk factors change over time in metabolically healthy people depending on body weight and what cardiovascular disease risk results from this.

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More Complications When Pacemaker Required After TAVR

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Harindra C. Wijeysundera MD PhD FRCPC FCCS FAHA Director of Research, Division of Cardiology, Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI) Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine & Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto Adjunct Senior Scientist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES)

Dr. Wijeysundera

Harindra C. Wijeysundera MD PhD FRCPC FCCS FAHA
Director of Research, Division of Cardiology,
Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI)
Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine & Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto
Adjunct Senior Scientist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES)
Toronto, ON, Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: One of the most common complications post TAVR is the need for a permanent pacemaker.  It is unclear if the need for a pacemaker is associated with long term adverse outcomes.

Using a population level registry of all TAVR procedures in ontario, canada, we found that pacemakers were required in ~15% of cases.  Requiring a pacemaker was associated with worse long term outcomes, including death, readmission to hospital and emergency room visits.  Continue reading

Study Finds Plant-Based Diet Can Reduce Cardiovascular Death by 40%

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Vegetarian Skewers” by Geoff Peters is licensed under CC BY 2.0Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D.
Director of clinical research
Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
Washington, DC 20016 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: In this study, my research team and I reviewed multiple clinical trials and observational studies to determine the links between diet and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We found that a healthy diet can reduce the risk of heart attack by more than 80 percent—something no drug has ever accomplished.

We also found strong and consistent evidence that plant-based dietary patterns (with few or no animal products and rich in fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes) can prevent and even reverse atherosclerosis and decrease other markers of CVD risk, including blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight. We found that a plant-based diet can reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease by about 40 percent overall.  Continue reading

PlaqueTec Liquid Biopsies Give Alternative Data To Systemic Biomarkers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
PlaqueTec liquid biopsiesDr. Nick West, MD
PlaqueTec Chief Medical Officer and Consultant Interventional Cardiologist
Royal Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Recent data have identified residual inflammatory risk as a potential therapeutic target to modulate future risk of coronary and vascular events independent of cholesterol lowering1. This approach has now been validated by the CANTOS study, showing reduction of peripheral blood levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and consequent reduction of the occurrence of major cardiac events in patients who had sustained a myocardial infarction2,3. Although controversy continues to rage regarding the relevance of ‘vulnerable plaque’ versus ‘vulnerable patient’ in the causation of acute coronary events, evolving data suggest a complex interplay between a proinflammatory milieu and ‘vulnerable’ plaque phenotypes 4,5 .

We used a novel dedicated intracoronary sampling catheter, the PlaqueTec Liquid Biopsy SystemTM (LBS), and sought to correlate systemic inflammatory indices with degree of local coronary inflammatory activity. The LBS has previously been validated to safely delineate the presence of gradients of inflammatory biomolecules in human coronary artery disease6. We measured blood levels of a large panel of inflammatory biomolecules using multiplexed assays in peripheral blood and in coronary-derived blood samples after balloon dilatation of coronary stenoses during coronary angioplasty, and assessed systemic levels of hsCRP by ELISA.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings? 

Response: Statistical analysis using K-means indicated our patient population (n=23), predominantly patients with stable angina, segregated into 2 discrete clusters of high and low overall coronary inflammatory states. However, when compared with peripheral (systemic) levels of the same inflammatory biomolecules in each cluster, there was no meaningful relationship. Additionally, there was no difference between median hsCRP measurements between the 2 clusters. Taken together, these data suggest that simply measuring peripheral markers of inflammation may not be able to determine local inflammatory activity within the coronary artery itself. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?
What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: These data provide interesting and hypothesis-generating data that explore the mechanisms of benefit in vascular risk by reducing systemic inflammation; rather than hsCRP acting as a simple ‘barometer’ for likelihood of events, it appears that presence of coronary inflammation may be an independent entity. Further studies are needed to address the complex relationship between systemic and coronary inflammation, and their respective interaction with ‘vulnerable’ plaque phenotypes in modulating patient events.

Disclosures: Dr West acts as a consultant to, and holds equity in, PlaqueTec Ltd.

Citations:

  1. Ridker PM. Residual inflammatory risk: addressing the obverse side of the atherosclerosis prevention coin. Eur Heart J 2016; 37: 1720-22.
  2. Ridker PM, Everett BM, Thuren T et al. Antiinflammatory therapy with canakinumab for atherosclerotic disease. N Engl J Med 2017; 377: 1119-31.
  3. Ridker PM, MacFadyen JG, Everett BM et al. Relationship of C-reactive protein reduction to cardiovascular event reduction following treatment with canakinumab: a secondary analysis from the CANTOS randomissed controlled trial. Lancet 2018; 391: 319-28.
  4. Libby P, Pasterkamp G. Requiem for the vulnerable plaque. Eur Heart J 2015; 36: 2984-7.
  5. Hansson GK, Libby P, Tabas I. Inflammation and plaque vulnerability. J Intern Med 2015; 278: 483-93.
  6. West NEJ, Corrigan JP, Owen RHG et al. Percutaneous sampling of local biomolecule gradients across coronary artery atherosclerotic plaques. J Am Coll Cardiol Basic Trans Science 2017; 2: 646-54.

Citation:

PlaqueTec Data Presented at EAS Show Lack of Correlation 
between Localised Coronary Artery Inflammatory Biomarker Expression and Systemic Elevation of Biomarkers including hsCRP

 

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Amyloid Biomarker Predictive of Mortality in Non-STEMI Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Prof. Dr. med. Konstantinos Stellos,MD, FAHA, FESC Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Genetic Medicine Newcastle upon Tyne United Kingdom

Prof. Stellos

Prof. Dr. med. Konstantinos Stellos,MD, FAHA, FESC
Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Genetic Medicine
Newcastle upon Tyne
United Kingdom

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

 

Response: Risk stratification of patients with a non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) remains a major challenge in clinical cardiology. Risk stratification is important to identify patients at high risk, to whom an early coronary intervention with optimal adjunctive medical therapy shall be applied to reduce that risk. Conversely, it is equally important to identify patients at low risk, to whom a potentially hazardous invasive therapy or a multi-drug administration shall be avoided. Current ACC/AHA and ESC guidelines agree in a standardized approach that uses Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score, a well validated scoring system, to calculate a patient’s risk and guide triage and management decisions.

Amyloid-β (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42 peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42), are proteolytic fragments of a larger protein, the amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaved by β- and γ-secretases, found in typical brain amyloid deposits in Alzheimer’s disease. Many lines of evidence support a role of Aβ40 in cardiovascular disease as a peptide with pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic properties. Most cardiovascular risk factors seem to affect APP metabolism and thus, Aβ production and its soluble circulating APP770 isoform are elevated in patients with ACS_ENREF_15, suggesting a role for Aβ40 in the triggering and outcome of ACS in stable CAD patients. Although vascular inflammation is considered as a hallmark in the pathophysiologic pathways of coronary artery disease (CAD) and novel mechanisms are continuously recognized in its pathogenesis, no inflammatory marker is currently recommended for risk stratification of patients with NSTE-ACS individually or as a component of the GRACE score. This may partly explain the moderate discriminative ability of GRACE score in some studies, especially in older patients and those after early percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

In this retrospective study, we used data from two independent prospective cohorts, the Heidelberg study (n=1,145) and the validation multicenter international APACE (Advantageous Predictors of Acute Coronary Syndrome Evaluation, n=734) study and determined the clinical prognostic and reclassification value of baseline circulating Aβ40 levels in the prediction of mortality over the GRACE risk score in patients with NSTE-ACS across a median follow-up of 21.9 ( Heidelberg cohort) and 24.9 months (APACE cohort), respectively.

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Oral Anticoagulants Still Underused in AFib Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Anna Gundlund, MD, PhD

Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, Department of Cardiology
Denmark 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Atrial fibrillation increases a person’s risk of ischemic strokes up to 5-fold. Oral anticoagulation therapy lowers this risk effectively (>60%) and is therefore recommended for patients with atrial fibrillation and at least 1-2 other risk factors for stroke.

Our study show, that oral anticoagulation therapy is still underused in patients with atrial fibrillation – even after a stroke event. In stroke survivors with atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation therapy were associated with better outcomes than no oral anticoagulation therapy.  Continue reading