Intestinal Microbiome Linked to Obesity and Fat Storage in Children

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Nicola Santoro, MD, PhD Associate Research Scientist in Pediatrics (Endocrinology) Yale University

Dr. Nicola Santoro

Nicola Santoro, MD, PhD
Associate Research Scientist in Pediatrics (Endocrinology)
Yale University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The study start from previous observations showing an association between the gut microbiota and obesity.

Similarly to what previously described in adults and in children, we found an association between the gut microbiota and obesity. We took a step further and also observed that the gut flora is associated to body fat partitioning (amount of fat in the abdomen). Moreover, we observed that the effect of microbiota could be mediated by the short chain fatty acids a product of gut flora.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: That the gut microbiota plays a role in modulating human metabolism.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We need to understand better how the metabolism of bacteria present in the gut can affect human metabolism.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Mego, M., Manichanh, C., Accarino, A., Campos, D., Pozuelo, M., Varela, E., Vulevic, J., Tzortzis, G., Gibson, G., Guarner, F. and Azpiroz, F. (2017), Metabolic adaptation of colonic microbiota to galactooligosaccharides: a proof-of-concept-study. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 45: 670–680. doi: 10.1111/apt.13931

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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