Surgery Beneficial to Some HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sharon S. Lum, MD, FACSProfessor in the Department of Surgery-Division of Surgical Oncology Medical Director of the Breast Health CenterLoma Linda University HealthLoma Linda University School of Medicine

Dr. Lum

Sharon S. Lum, MD, FACS, Professor
Department of Surgery-Division of Surgical Oncology
Medical Director of the Breast Health Center
Loma Linda University Health
Loma Linda University School of Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  

Response: Anecdotally, we observed that many patients with advanced HER2+ breast cancer have had tremendous responses to the new targeted therapies and the oncologists were referring them back to surgeons for consideration of local regional therapy.

While traditionally surgeons have avoided operating on metastatic breast cancer patients due to the patient’s likelihood of dying from their metastatic disease, these HER2+ patients seemed to be doing so well that surgery might make sense. In our surgical oncology clinic, we seemed to be operating more on these patients. Since these patients seemed to be living longer, they might survive long enough for their primary tumor to become a problem for them.

However, we did not have any data to support doing surgery in these cases. Prior studies have demonstrated mixed results regarding the survival benefit from surgery for stage IV breast cancer patients, but these were completed prior to routine use of anti-HER targeted therapies, so we wanted to further examine the role of surgery in HER2+ stage IV breast cancer patients.

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Therapeutic HPV Vaccine Can Trigger Resolution of Virus and Cervical Cancer in Some CIN Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.Professor of Family Medicine and Obstetrics and GynecologySenior Associate Director, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health ResearchPhysician Director for Community Outreach, Engagement and Health Disparities,Rogel Cancer CenterMichigan Medicine

Dr. Harper

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.
Professor of Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology
Senior Associate Director, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Physician Director for Community Outreach, Engagement and Health Disparities,
Rogel Cancer Center
Michigan Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: There is no current cure for women with HPV infection that has progressed to CIN 2/3 disease. The only treatment is for the diseased cervix, and does not eliminate the risk of another CIN 2/3 from the HPV infection 15-20 years later.

This vaccine is made from a live virus that has 3 genes inserted:  human cytokine IL-2, and modified forms of HPV 16 E6 and E7 proteins. When the vaccine is injected subcutaneously, the proteins for HPV 16/E6 and E7 and the cytokine LI-2 proteins are made. These proteins trigger the immune response.  This is very different form imiquimod which is topical and not specific for HPV.

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HPV Vaccination Rates Low Among Adults at High-Risk for HIV Infection

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lisa T. Wigfall, PhD, MCHES(R)Assistant Professor, Health and KinesiologyTexas A&M

Dr. Wigfall

Lisa T. Wigfall, PhD, MCHES(R)
Assistant Professor, Health and Kinesiology
Texas A&M

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Human papilloma virus (or HPV) is a very common sexually transmitted infection that can cause some types of cancer. These include anal, cervical, oral, penile, vaginal, and vulvar cancers. Some people such as people who are HIV-positive and men who have sex with men have a greater risk for developing HPV-associated cancers. The risk of developing anal cancer is significantly higher for men who have sex with men who are also HIV-positive.

Our study included adults who were at risk for becoming HIV-positive, which included having unprotected anal sex.

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Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Liquid Biopsy Pinpoints Treatment Options

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Vassiliki Papadimitrakopoulou, MDProfessor of MedicineDepartment of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical OncologyMD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston

Dr. Papadimitrakopoulou

Vassiliki Papadimitrakopoulou, MD
Professor of Medicine
Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology
MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: 30% of patients with newly diagnosed advanced NSCLC can be treated successfully with targeted therapies, often yielding higher response rates than chemotherapy or immune checkpoint inhibitors. Selecting first-line therapy for patients with NSCLC requires assessment of an expanding list of guideline-recommended genomic biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF, RET, MET amplification and exon 14 skipping, and ERBB2, with NTRK newly added)

Standard-of-care (SOC) testing relies on tissue, which is limited by biopsy-related risks, specimen insufficiency, and lab processing duration, which hamper timely optimal treatment selection

–          NILE is a large, prospective, multicenter, head-to-head study of SOC tissue-based genomic testing to plasma-based comprehensive cfDNA genomic testing (Guardant360®). For the four biomarkers with FDA approved therapies, up to 34% of patients were tested by SOC tissue testing versus 95% with cfDNA testing. NILE met its primary endpoint – cfDNA performed similar to tissue in the detection of guideline-recommended biomarkers and cfDNA results were delivered significantly faster than SOC tissue testing (median 9 days vs. 15 days).Using cfDNA testing first, 87% of patients with a guideline-recommended biomarker would have been detected, compared to 67% if SOC tissue testing was first.

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Misdiagnosis Common Among Young Adults With Colon Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ronit Yarden, PhD, MHSA
Director of Medical Affairs
Colorectal Cancer Alliance, a patient advocacy organization
Washington, D.C. 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: The colorectal Cancer Alliance is a patient advocacy group (the largest advocacy group for colorectal cancer) and its mission is to provide support to patients, survivors, their caregivers and family members as well as advocate on their behalf for.  The organization is also committed to raise awareness for screening and early detection of colorectal cancer to help save lives and to provide funding for innovative colorectal cancer research.

As part of our support we sought to identify some of the clinical, emotional and financial experiences and unmet needs of patients under 50 years old.  We conducted an online survey that was promoted through social media and 1195 patients and survivors completed our survey.  Continue reading