Author Interviews, HIV, Microbiome, PLoS, Sexual Health / 16.04.2019

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_48583" align="alignleft" width="98"]Brent E. Palmer, PhDAssociate Professor of MedicineDirector, ClinImmune and ACI/ID Flow Cytometry FacilityDivision of Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyAurora, Colorado 80045 Brent Palmer[/caption] Brent E. Palmer, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine Director, ClinImmune and ACI/ID Flow Cytometry Facility Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology University of Colorado Anschutz Medical College Aurora, Colorado 80045  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?  Response: Previous studies showed that in western populations, men who have sex with men (MSM) have a distinct gut microbiome composition when compared with men who have sex with women (MSW). We wanted to understand how these microbiome differences in MSM could impact their immune system. To test this, we transferred feces from healthy MSW and MSM to gnotobiotic (germ-free) mice and examined the immune system in the mice post-transplant. In mice that received transfers from MSM, there were higher frequencies of activated T cells in gut tissues, which are the primary targets of HIV. This result suggested that gut microbes associated with MSM sexual behavior may actually contribute to HIV transmission by driving activation of HIV target cells. In fact, when we stimulated human gut derived cells with gut microbes isolated from MSM and MSW, cells that were stimulated with microbes from MSM were infected at a higher rate.
Author Interviews, Health Care Systems, JAMA / 24.03.2019

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_48108" align="alignleft" width="160"]Maryam Guiahi, MDAssociate Professor, Ob/GynSchool of MedicineUniversity of Colorado Dr. Guiahi[/caption] Maryam Guiahi, MD Associate Professor, Ob/Gyn School of Medicine University of Colorado  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops expects providers in Catholic Health Care Facilities to follow the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, which places limits on reproductive and end-of-life care. Prior research has demonstrated that many patients do not anticipate religious health care restrictions, yet often face conflicts in care. We were interested in whether Catholic hospitals disclose their religious affiliation and explain to patients how this affiliation may impact the care they are offered.
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Women's Heart Health / 19.12.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_46639" align="alignleft" width="200"]Dr. Sarah Perman MD, M.S.C.E. Assistant professor of Emergency Medicine University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver  Dr. Perman[/caption] Dr. Sarah Perman MD, M.S.C.E. Assistant professor of Emergency Medicine University of Colorado School of Medicine Denver  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Women who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been observed to receive less bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (B-CPR) than men, and the potential reasons were largely unknown. We asked 54 people online to explain – with no word limit – why women might be less likely to get CPR when they collapse in public.
Author Interviews, Cannabis, Diabetes, JAMA / 06.11.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_45647" align="alignleft" width="150"]Viral Shah, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine & Pediatrics Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, Adult Clinic School of Medicine University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Dr. Shah[/caption] Viral Shah, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine & Pediatrics Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, Adult Clinic School of Medicine University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Cannabis use is increasing in Colorado and many patients with type 1 diabetes (which is an autoimmune form of diabetes that requires life insulin therapy) are using cannabis. Therefore, we surveyed adult patients with type 1 diabetes to study the association between cannabis use and glycemic control and diabetes acute complications (such as diabetic ketoacidosis) in adults with type 1 diabetes. Main findings of the study:  The risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious condition where body produces high levels of acids called ketones in patients with diabetes)  was two times higher among adults with type 1 diabetes who reported using cannabis in the past 12 months compared to adults with type 1 diabetes who reported not using cannabis.
Author Interviews, Genetic Research, NEJM, Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatology / 24.10.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_45454" align="alignleft" width="133"]Joyce S. Lee, MD Associate Professor Director, Interstitial Lung Disease Program Department of Medicine Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine University of Colorado School of Medicine Dr. Lee[/caption] Joyce S. Lee, MD Associate Professor Director, Interstitial Lung Disease Program Department of Medicine Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine University of Colorado School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?  Response: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common inflammatory arthritis that can be complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD). Patients with RA-ILD share clinical characteristics with another ILD called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Given the similar clinical phenotype, our goal was to see if these lung diseases (IPF and RA-ILD) shared a common genetic risk factor. The MUC5B promoter variant is the most common risk factor (genetic and otherwise) for the development of IPF. Our findings demonstrate the MUC5B promoter variant is also a strong risk factor for the development of RA-ILD among patients with RA.