HPV Testing or PAP Smear To Screen for Cervical Cancer?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Joy Melnikow, MD, MPH Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine Director, Center for Healthcare Policy and Research University of California, Davis Sacramento, CA 95817

Dr. Melnikow

Joy Melnikow, MD, MPH
Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine
Director, Center for Healthcare Policy and Research
University of California, Davis
Sacramento, CA 95817

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This systematic review of the medical literature was conducted to support the update of the US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation.  Because the effectiveness of cytology (Pap smear) screening is so well established, the review focused on the evidence on use of high risk Human Papillomavirus (hrHPV) screening, alone (primary screening) or combined with cytology (co-testing)

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Current evidence supports the use of cytology, hrHPV testing alone, or co-testing as effective approaches to screening for cervical cancer.  hrHPV testing, alone or as co-testing, can be done at five year intervals, longer than the recommended 3 year interval for cytology. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: Additional research is needed to identify effective strategies for outreach and screening women who are not regularly screened.  Because most women in the US are not part of an organized screening program, effective outreach is especially important in the US. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Since the prior review, more evidence has emerged to support the use of hrHPV testing as primary screening.

I have no financial conflicts of interest. 

Citation:

US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for Cervical CancerUS Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2018;320(7):674–686. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.10897

Aug 22, 2018 @ 12:01 pm 

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ORILISSA™ (elagolix) Now Approved for Management of Moderate to Severe Pain Associated with Endometriosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Dawn Carlson MD MPH Vice President, General Medicine Development AbbVie 

Dr. Carlson

Dr. Dawn Carlson MD MPH
Vice President, General Medicine Development
AbbVie 

MedicalResearch.com: Please provide some background on this announcement. Would you briefly explain what endometriosis is? Whom does it affect and how does it interfere with quality of life?

Response: Endometriosis is one of the most common gynecologic disorders in the U.S that affects an estimated one in 10 women of reproductive age. It occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus starts growing outside of the uterus, where it doesn’t belong.

The symptoms of endometriosis, including pain with menstrual periods and between periods, and with sexual intercourse, can be debilitating and significantly impact day-to-day activities of women’s lives, personally and professionally. Unfortunately, women with endometriosis can suffer for up to 10 years and visit multiple physicians before receiving a proper diagnosis. Unresolved endometriosis pain results in higher healthcare costs from emergency department visits and repeat surgeries.  Continue reading

Girls with PID Underscreened For Syphilis and HIV in ERs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Monika K. Goyal, M.D., M.S.C.E., senior study author Assistant professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine Children’s National Health System Washington, DC

Dr. Goyal

Monika K. Goyal, M.D., M.S.C.E., senior study author
Assistant professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine
Children’s National Health System
Washington, DC 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Patients with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) are at an increased risk for syphilis and HIV. We know that adolescents account for 20 percent of the 1 million cases of PID that are diagnosed each year. We also know that an estimated one in four sexually active adolescent females has a sexually transmitted infection (STI). While screening for syphilis and HIV is recommended when diagnosing PID, actual screening rates among adolescents have been understudied.

This multi-center study aimed to quantify rates of HIV and syphilis screening in young women diagnosed with . pelvic inflammatory disease in pediatric emergency departments and to explore patient- and hospital-specific characteristics associated with screening for these two sexually transmitted infections.

Continue reading