Racial and Gender Disparities in CABG Surgery After First Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Srikanth Yandrapalli New York Medical College NYMC · Cardiology

Dr. Yandrapalli

Dr. Srikanth Yandrapalli
New York Medical College
NYMC · Cardiology

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Selection of coronary artery bypass grafting over percutaneous coronary intervention during an acute myocardial infarction is influenced by the extent of coronary artery disease and patient comorbidities. Prior studies have shown sex and racial differences in coronary artery diseaseburden.

We sought to identify if there are any sex and racial differences in the utilization of  coronary artery bypass grafting over percutaneous coronary intervention during a revascularized first  acute myocardial infarction in the US.

We found that males had a higher coronary artery bypass grafting rate than women, and compared to Whites, Blacks had lower coronary artery bypass grafting rate and Asians had higher coronary artery bypass grafting at the time of a first myocardial infarction.

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Silent MI Before Acute Heart Attack Can Be Poor Prognostic Indicator

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robin Nijveldt  MD PhD FESC Radboudumc Department of Cardiology The Netherlands

Dr. Nijveldt

Robin Nijveldt  MD PhD FESC
Radboudumc, Department of Cardiology and
VU University Medical Center
Department of cardiology
the Netherlands

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We know from previous studies that patients with unrecognized myocardial infarcts have worse prognosis than people without infarcts.

It was currently unknown in how many patients presenting with a first acute myocardial infarction had previous unrecognized MI, and if so, if this is still a prognostic marker on long term follow-up.

In this paper we studied 405 patients from 2 academic hospitals in the Netherlands, with an average follow-up duration of 6.8 years. We found that silent MI was present in 8.2% of patients presenting with first acute MI, and that silent MI is a strong and independent predictor for adverse long-term clinical outcome such as death (HR 3.69) or the composite end point of death, reinfarction, ischemic stroke, or CABG (HR 3.05). Additionally, it appears that ECG is of limited value to detect silent MI, since our study did not reveal an association with long-term clinical outcome.

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Non-Cardiac Chest Pain After Acute MI Associated With Poor Quality of Life

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Mohammed Qintar, MD Cardiovascular Fellow St Luke’s Health System Kansas City

Dr. Mohammed Qintar

Dr. Mohammed Qintar, MD
Cardiovascular Fellow
St Luke’s Health System
Kansas City

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: One in four patients experience recurrent chest pain after acute myocardial infarction, but not all patients present with cardiac chest pain secondary to coronary ischemia. The frequency of non-cardiac chest pain re-hospitalitzation after acute myocardial infarction and its impact on patients’ health status has not been described after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Both providers evaluating these patients and patients who have recently suffered an AMI are understandably concerned about any recurrent chest pain symptoms, and often present for urgent evaluation of these symptoms.

In the first year after acute myocardial infarction, we found that a third of patients hospitalized for evaluation of chest pain actually presented with non-cardiac chest pain. Compared with patients not hospitalized with chest pain, non-cardiac chest pain hospitalization was associated with worse angina-related quality of life and general mental and physical health status. The quality of life for patients hospitalized with non-cardiac chest pain was similar to patients hospitalized with cardiac chest pain, suggesting a significant impact on their quality of life even though their pain did not reflect underlying coronary ischemia.

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Heavy Episodic Alcohol Use Raises Risk of Heart Attack

Dr. Darryl P. Leong MBBS(Hons) MPH PhD FRACP FESC Hamilton General Hospital 237 Barton Street East CanadaMedicalResearch.com: Interview with:
Dr. Darryl P. Leong MBBS(Hons) MPH PhD FRACP FESC
Hamilton General Hospital
237 Barton Street East Canada

 

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Leong: The main findings of this study are that while low-moderate levels of alcohol use are associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction, this protective association was not seen in peoples of all ethnicities.

Secondly, heavy alcohol use (≥6 drinks) within a 24 hour period was associated with a significant increase in the immediate risk of myocardial infarction.
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Myocardial Infarction: What Results in Delays for Stent Surgery in Transferred Patients?

Laurie Lambert, PhD Unité d'évaluation en cardiologie Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS) Montréal, QuébecMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Laurie Lambert, PhD
Unité d’évaluation en cardiologie
Institut national d’excellence en santé
et en services sociaux (INESSS)
Montréal, Québec

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Lambert: Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are frequently transferred for percutaneous coronary reperfusion from a hospital without this capability. Favourable outcomes depend on minimizing delays to treatment. A major component of delay is the time from the patient’s arrival at the first hospital’s emergency department to departure to the hospital where percutaneous reperfusion will be performed, the ‘door-in-door-out’ time or DIDO. We characterized this component of delay in a systematic field evaluation of STEMI treatment over a large and populous geographic area.

The major contributors to DIDO time were the delays

  • (1) from the initial in-hospital ECG acquisition to transfer activation by the emergency physician and
  • (2) from arrival of the transfer ambulance at the first hospital to departure of the ambulance for the primary percutaneous coronary intervention center. When the DIDO interval was timely (30 minutes or less as recommended by guidelines), reperfusion treatment was far more frequently within guideline-recommended delays (90 minutes or less). In fact, this benchmark of DIDO time was met in only 14% of cases. We identified a number of factors associated with untimely DIDO, an important one being an ambiguous presenting ECG. DIDO times were faster when patients arrived at the first hospital by ambulance particularly when retransfer to the second hospital was with the same ambulance that had remained on standby.

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MI: Gender Differences Remain in Presentation, Treatment and Outcomes

Luke Kim, M.D., FACC, FSCAI Assistant Professor of Medicine Interventional Cardiac and Endovascular Laboratory  Greenberg Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine Weill Cornell Medical College/The New York Presbyterian HospitalMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Luke Kim, M.D., FACC, FSCAI
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Interventional Cardiac and Endovascular Laboratory
Greenberg Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medical College/The New York Presbyterian Hospital

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of this study?

Dr. Kim: The main findings of the study include:

  1. From 2007-2011, there was no significant change in the rate of acute MI in both male and female cohorts in U.S. . Although there was a decline in the rate of ST-elevation (STEMI) in those ≥55 years old, the rate remains steady in patients < 55 years old, especially in the female cohort after 2009.
  2. Female patients <55 years old with MI were sicker at baseline than the male counterparts with more likelihood of having diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure and obesity.
  3. Female patients were more likely to present with non– STEMI vs. STEMI and more likely to develop shock complicating their MIs.
  4. Female patients are less likely to undergo coronary artery revascularization including percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass surgery.
  5. Unadjusted risk of death was higher in female vs male (5.2% vs. 3.7%, p<0.001) along with higher incidence of stroke (0.5% vs. 0.3%, p<0.001), bleeding (4.9% vs. 3.0%, p<0.001), vascular complication (0.6% vs. 0.4%, p<0.001) and ARF (11.6% vs. 9.6%, p<0.001). After adjustment, death (OR 1.10 CI 1.04-1.17), stroke (OR 1.31 CI 1.10-1.55), bleeding (OR 1.30 CI 1.22-1.37), and vascular complications (OR 1.33 CI 1.15-1.55) were all significantly higher for female cohort.

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Post MI: Increasing Dietary Fiber Decreased Mortality

Shanshan Li, Doctoral candidate Department of Epidemiology Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115, USAMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Shanshan Li, Doctoral candidate
Department of Epidemiology
Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115, USA


MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: This is the first study to show that greater intake of dietary fiber,
especially cereal fiber, was inversely associated with all-cause
mortality. Participants increased their average dietary fiber intake
after myocardial infarction (MI), and the greater the increase, the lower was the risk of
subsequent all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Overall, the
benefits for increased fiber intake were strongest for fiber from
cereal and grain sources.

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