Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Esophageal, Nutrition / 05.02.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: “Hot tea #steam” by Thomas Ricker is licensed under CC BY 2.0Jun / 吕筠 Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center Beijing 100191  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Esophageal cancer (EC) remains a global concern because of its increasing incidence and persistently poor survival. It poses a bigger threat to less developed regions and men. Tea is one of the most common beverages worldwide and usually consumed at elevated temperature. Existing evidence remains inconclusive as to the association between tea consumption and EC risk. Tea consumers, especially in Chinese men, are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption, as well as the chemical compounds and adverse thermal effect of high-temperature tea, considerably complicate the association between tea consumption and esophageal cancer risk.
Author Interviews, Blood Pressure - Hypertension, Coffee / 03.12.2015

[caption id="attachment_19771" align="alignleft" width="177"]Wenji Li, MMed, PhD Postdoc Associate Department of Pharmaceutics Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Dr. Wenji Li[/caption] MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Wenji Li, MMed, PhD Postdoc Associate Department of Pharmaceutics Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Li: Hypertension is a vital risk factor for many serious disorders. Male and age ≥40 years were found to be highly associated with more severe hypertension. In Singapore, the prevalence of hypertension increased markedly from age 40 years onwards. Tea, a popular beverage in Chinese people, has been approved to possess many beneficial pharmacological effects including antihypertension. However, no clinical studies on the correlation between tea drinking and its effect on lowering blood pressure among Singaporeans have been conducted. To find out the potential link, we are the first to investigate the correlation of hypertension and consumption of tea, health supplements, living habits and socio-demographic factors among Singaporean Chinese residents. By the large scale cross-sectional epidemiology study (N = 1184), we found the prevalence of hypertension among the whole investigated population was 49.73% and the prevalence increased to 66.47% in the sub-population aged ⩾60 years. High risk of hypertension was associated with age ⩾60 years, obesity, family history of hypertension, diabetes history, hyperlipidemia history, male and coffee intake. In contrast, drinking green tea at least 150 ml per week was associated with lower hypertension risk. Drinking combination of green tea and British tea was associated with higher reduction in the risk of hypertension. This study suggests that consumption of tea, especially green tea and British tea, is beneficial for lowering the risk of hypertension while the consumption of coffee may have the opposite effect. 
Author Interviews, Osteoporosis / 17.08.2015

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Jonathan M. Hodgson School of Medicine and Pharmacology Royal Perth Hospital University of Western Australia Perth, Australia MedicalResearch What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Hodgson: Flavonoids are a class of phytochemicals present at high levels in tea. Observational studies have found that higher tea and flavonoid intakes are associated with higher bone mineral density. However, the relationships of tea and flavonoid intakes with fracture risk are not clear. We therefore examined the relationship of black tea drinking and flavonoid intake with fracture risk in a population of women aged over 75 years followed for 10 years. We found that a higher intake of black tea and particular classes of flavonoids, some of which are derived primarily from tea, were associated with lower risk of fracture-related hospitalizations in these elderly women.