Higher Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Long Term Antibiotic Use in Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Lu Qi MD PhD
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
Tulane University New Orleans, LA 70112
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA 02115

Yoriko Heianza RD, PhD
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine,
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Growing data suggest that antibiotic exposure is associated with a long-lasting alteration in gut microbiota, and may be related to subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated associations of duration of antibiotic use in different phases of adulthood (young, middle and late adulthood) with the CVD incidence among women at usual risk.

This new analysis from the Nurses’ Health Study shows that women who take antibiotics for long periods, especially during more recent adulthood (such as  in middle- and late adulthood) had a higher risk of CVD in later life.  Continue reading

Changes in WIC Program Linked to Decreased Obesity in Children

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

M. Pia Chaparro, MS, PhDAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Global Community Health and Behavioral SciencesSchool of Public Health and Tropical MedicineTulane UniversityNew Orleans, LA 70112

Dr. Chaparro

M. Pia Chaparro, MS, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences
School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA 70112

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In 2009, the WIC program changed the food packages participants receive to better align them with federal dietary guidelines. These changes included the addition of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains; a reduction in the amount of dairy and juice; and a calibration in formula amounts to match infants’ age and needs.

We found that this change in the food package was associated with a 10-12% lower obesity risk at age 4 years among children who participated in WIC in Los Angeles County continuously from birth until age 4. Continue reading