Number Of High School Students Who Indoor Tan Dropped In Half

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Matthew Reynolds
Acting Team Lead, Office of Communication
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Chamblee GA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Indoor tanning and sunburns, particularly during adolescence and young adulthood, increases the risk of developing skin cancer. Researchers examined trends in the prevalence of indoor tanning and the relationship between indoor tanning and sunburn among US high school students. Pooled cross-sectional data from the 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. The study included nationally representative samples of U.S. high school students.

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UV Sensitive ‘Band-aid’ Makes Monitoring Sun Exposure Easy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Andrea M Armani PhD Fluor Early Career Chair and Associate Professor Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California credit to USC Viterbi.

Dr. Andrea M Armani

Dr. Andrea M Armani PhD
Fluor Early Career Chair and Associate Professor
Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The “Internet of Things” (IoT) has seen an explosion in online sensor technologies, including UV sensors and monitors; for example, those from Apple and Samsung. However, they require connectivity and power, and they are integrated into delicate electronic systems that are not compatible with outdoor, athletic activities such as swimming, which is precisely when you should monitor UV exposure. Therefore, somewhat ironically, the technologies developed to meet the demands of the IoT are not ideal for cumulative UV exposure detection.

Our goal was to develop a single use patch – like a smart “band-aid” – for the beach to alert users when they had been in the sun for an hour and needed to re-apply sunscreen or get out of the sun altogether. This application required a rugged system that was waterproof, bendable, and compatible with sunscreen. Additionally, the sensor readout needed to be easy to interpret. These requirements influenced our design and material selection.

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Skin Damaged by Sunlight Even When Out of the Sun

Douglas E. Brash, PhD Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and Dermatology Yale School of Medicine New Haven, CTMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Douglas E. Brash, PhD

Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and Dermatology
Yale School of Medicine New Haven, CT

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Brash: We wanted to know whether the origin of melanoma differed from other cancers because of the melanin. It has long been known that blondes and redheads are sensitive to sunlight, but the prevailing view was that this was because their skin is light. But there are light-skinned, dark-haired people in countries near the equator and they don’t have the high skin cancer incidence seen in Australia. Several labs, including ours, had irradiated cells or mice with UV and found more cell death in cells containing melanin than cells lacking melanin. In the last couple of years, two papers have focused attention on the issue; one study found that irradiating mice with UVA only gave melanomas if the skin contained melanin and the other study found that mice genetically predisposed to UV-induced melanoma developed melanomas even without UV if they also had red melanin.

The most important findings are:

First, our skin continues to be damaged by sunlight even when we’re out of the sun.

Second, the melanin pigment in your skin is bad for you as well as good: it may be carcinogenic as well as protective.

Third, the chemistry underlying these events, chemical excitation of electrons, has not been seen in mammals before. Continue reading