Childhood Atopic Dermatitis Linked To Obesity And Hypertension

Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH Assistant Professor in Dermatology, Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, IllinoisMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH

Assistant Professor in Dermatology, Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Silverberg: Previous studies found associations between obesity and atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little was known about the association between AD and metabolic risk factors, such as central obesity and high blood pressure.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Silverberg: A multicenter pediatric dermatology practice-based case-control study was performed, including 132 children with moderate to severe AD and 143 healthy controls. Moderate to severe AD was associated with general obesity, as judged by body mass index for age and sex ≥97th percentile and International Obesity Task Force cutoffs. In addition, moderate to severe AD was associated with central obesity, as judged by waist circumference ≥85th percentile and waist-to-height ratio ≥0.5. Moderate to severe atopic dermatitis was associated with higher blood pressure for age, sex and height percentiles overall, particularly those ≥90th percentile. Finally, moderate to severe atopic dermatitis was associated a family history of hypertension and type 2 diabetes.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Silverberg: Children and adolescents with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis are at higher risk for metabolic risk factors, namely central obesity and hypertension. In turn, they may be at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later in life. It appears that children and adolescents with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis might benefit from increased screening for adiposity and blood pressure.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Silverberg: Future studies are needed to confirm the novel associations of AD and metabolic risk factors and determine the long-term cardiovascular health consequences.

Citation:

upcoming JAMA publication:

 

 

 

 

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