Sugar Sweetened Beverages Linked to Increase in Belly Fat

Dr. Caroline Fox, MD MPH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School

Dr. Fox

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Caroline Fox, MD MPH
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Fox: There is evidence linking sugar sweetened beverages with obesity and type 2 diabetes. There is also evidence suggesting that specific adipose tissue depots may play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. We found that higher levels of sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) intake was associated with more visceral fat (fat in the stomach cavity) over 6 years.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Fox: Our message to consumers is to follow the current dietary guidelines and be mindful of how much sugar sweetened beverages they are consuming. To policy makers, this study adds another piece of evidence to the growing body of research that suggests that SSB may be harmful to our health.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Fox: It would be important to understand the mechanisms linking sugar sweetened beverage intake to increases in visceral fat.

Citation:

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption is Associated With Change of Visceral Adipose Tissue Over 6 Years of Follow-Up

Jiantao Ma, Nicola M. McKeown, Shih-Jen Hwang, Udo Hoffman, Paul F. Jacques, and Caroline S. Fox

Circulation. 2016;CIRCULATIONAHA.115.018704published online before print January 11 2016, doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.01870

[wysija_form id=”5″]

Dr. Caroline Fox (2016). Sugar Sweetened Beverages Linked to Increase in Belly Fat 

Please follow and like us:
Tags: