Soda, Sugary Drinks Linked to Increased Risk of Kidney Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MNSP, MPH, FAHA Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Core Faculty, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research Baltimore, MD 21287

Dr. Rebholz

Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MNSP, MPH, FAHA
Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Core Faculty, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research
Baltimore, MD 21287

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Individual beverages have been previously shown to influence risk of a wide range of cardiometabolic diseases. Less is known about beverage consumption and kidney disease risk.

In this study population, we found that one such beverage pattern consisted of soda, sugar-sweetened beverages, and water, and that higher adherence to the sugar-sweetened beverage pattern was associated with greater odds of developing incident kidney disease, even after accounting for demographic characteristics and established risk factors. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: This study provides further evidence for the adverse health effects of sugar-sweetened beverages and provides support for recommendations to avoid their consumption.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future research should collect more detailed information about types of water with respect to sweeteners and flavors added to water.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

Response: Studying patterns of beverages rather than individual beverages may be more appropriate to fully capture dietary behavior and disease risk.

No disclosures. 

Citation:

Patterns of Beverages Consumed and Risk of Incident Kidney Disease

Casey M. Rebholz, Bessie A. Young, Ronit Katz, Katherine L. Tucker, Teresa C. Carithers, Arnita F. Norwood and Adolfo Correa

CJASN December 2018, CJN.06380518; DOI: https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.06380518

Jan 2, 2019 @ 5:16 pm 

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.