Steroids for Risk of Late Preterm Delivery Help Babies and Reduce Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, MD, MScEllen Jacobson Levine and Eugene JacobsonProfessor of Women's Health in Obstetrics and GynecologyDirector, Maternal-Fetal Medicine Fellowship ProgramCo-Director, CUMC Preterm Birth Prevention Center Columbia University

Dr. Gyamfi-Bannerman

Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, MD, MSc
Ellen Jacobson Levine and Eugene Jacobson
Professor of Women’s Health in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Director, Maternal-Fetal Medicine Fellowship Program
Co-Director, CUMC Preterm Birth Prevention Center
Columbia University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In 2016 our group published the findings of the Antenatal Late Preterm Steroids (ALPS) trial in the NEJM.  We found that administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at high risk for delivery from 34-36 weeks decreased breathing problems in their neonates.  This treatment had been traditionally only given at less than 34 weeks.

The current paper is a cost analysis of that trial.  We found that the treatment was also cost effective.  From a cost perspective treatment was both low cost and highly effective (the options are low cost, low effect/low cost/high effect, high cost/low effect, high cost/high effect). 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Steroids help these babies and are not associated with an increase in cost, primarily because these babies needed less postnatal interventions for breathing issues. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: We are currently working to see if there are long term breathing benefits by assessing the children at age 6.

No disclosures

Citations:

Gyamfi-Bannerman C, Zupancic JAF, Sandoval G, et al. Cost-effectiveness of Antenatal Corticosteroid Therapy vs No Therapy in Women at Risk of Late Preterm DeliveryA Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical TrialJAMA Pediatr. Published online March 11, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.0032

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The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Megan A McCrory, PhD, FTOS

Research Associate Professor

Dept of Health Sciences | Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Boston University 02215

 

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

 

 

Response: In 2016 our group published the findings of the Antenatal Late Preterm Steroids (ALPS) trial in the NEJM.  We found that administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at high risk for delivery from 34-36 weeks decreased breathing problems in their neonates.  This treatment had been traditionally only given at less than 34 weeks.  The current paper is a cost analysis of that trial.  We found that the treatment was also cost effective.  From a cost perspective treatment was both low cost and highly effective (the options are low cost, low effect/low cost/high effect, high cost/low effect, high cost/high effect).

 

 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

 

Response: Steroids help these babies and are not associated with an increase in cost, primarily because these babies needed less postnatal interventions for breathing issues.

 

 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

 

Response: We are currently working to see if there are long term breathing benefits by assessing the children at age 6.

 

 

 

No disclosures\

 

 

 

 

Citations:

Fast-Food Offerings in the United States in 1986, 1991, and 2016 Show Large Increases in Food Variety, Portion Size, Dietary Energy, and Selected Micronutrients

McCrory, Megan A. et al.

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics , Volume 0 , Issue 0 ,

https://jandonline.org/action/showCitFormats?pii=S2212-2672%2818%2932383-9&doi=10.1016%2Fj.jand.2018.12.004

 

 

MedicalResearch.com is not a forum for the exchange of personal medical information, advice or the promotion of self-destructive behavior (e.g., eating disorders, suicide). While you may freely discuss your troubles, you should not look to the Website for information or advice on such topics. Instead, we recommend that you talk in person with a trusted medical professional.

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

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