Diversity Standards Linked to More Female, Black and Hispanic Students in Medical Schools

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Dowin H. Boatright, MD Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine Yale School of Medicine

Dr. Boatright

Dr. Dowin H. Boatright, MD
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Yale School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: This observational study looked at changes in student makeup by sex, race and ethnicity at U.S. medical schools after an accrediting organization introduced diversity standards in 2009.

An analysis of data from 120 medical schools suggests implementation of the diversity standards were associated with increasing percentages of female, black students, and Hispanic students.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? 

Response: Accreditation standards may be an effective policy lever to increase diversity in the physician workforce. Nevertheless, while study results are promising, women, black, and Hispanic physicians remain underrepresented in the physician workforce.  

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future studies should evaluate changes in student demographics at individual medical schools. Institutions that have proven to be successful in recruiting diverse medical school classes could serve as a model for other schools looking to improve medical student diversity.

No dislosures

Citation:

Boatright DH, Samuels EA, Cramer L, et al. Association Between the Liaison Committee on Medical Education’s Diversity Standards and Changes in Percentage of Medical Student Sex, Race, and Ethnicity. JAMA.2018;320(21):2267–2269. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.13705

Dec 5, 2018 @ 12:58 pm 

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17 States Have More White Deaths Than Births

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rogelio Saenz PhD Dean, College of Public Policy University of Texas at San Antonio Senior Fellow

Dr. Rogelio Saenz

Rogelio Saenz PhD
Dean, College of Public Policy
University of Texas at San Antonio
Senior Fellow

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: My colleague, Kenneth M. Johnson, and I conducted research based on mortality and birth data from the Center for Disease Control. These data allow us to assess natural decrease, i.e., greater number of deaths compared to births. We find that 17 states had more white deaths than white births in 2014, the most historically, compared to only four in 2004. We find that the 17 states with white natural decrease tend to have relatively high percentages of their populations being elderly (65 and older), low proportions of women being in childbearing ages (15-44), and relatively low fertility rates.

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