Dapsone Found Effective As Second Line Treatment for Hives

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Nicholas A. Soter, MD The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology New York University School of Medicine New York, New York

Dr. Nicholas Soter

Nicholas A. Soter, MD
The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
New York University School of Medicine
New York, New York

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Nearly 50% of patients with chronic spontaneous urticarial (CSU) (hives) incompletely respond to first-line therapy with H-1 antihistamines.

However, in the current literature, there is limited evidence to guide the treatment of CSU after maximal therapy with antihistamines fails.  Two small, randomized, controlled trials suggest that dapsone, which is an antimicrobial therapeutic agent with anti-inflammatory properties, may be a useful second-line therapeutic agent.

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Omalizumab (XOLAIR) For Chronic Hives (Urticaria)

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hives - Wikipedia image James Heilman, MD - Own work

Hives – Wikipedia image

Christopher S. Lee, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN, FHFSA
Professor and Associate Dean for Research
Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Although the efficacy of omalizumab (i.e. can it work?) in the treatment of chronic idiopathic (spontaneous) urticaria has been established in clinical trials, the effectiveness of omalziumab (i.e. does it work?) in the real-world management is less well established.

The purpose of this study was to synthesize what is known about the benefits and harms of omalizumab as used in real-world treatment of Chronic Idiopathic (Spontaneous) Urticaria.

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Chronic Hives In Children Resolve Slowly

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hives-Urticaria Wikipedia image

Hives-Urticaria
Wikipedia image

Elena Netchiporouk, MD, FRCPC, MSc
Dermatology Resident – PGY5 and
Dr. Moshe Ben-Shoshan, MD, FRCPC, MSc
McGill University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We have followed a pediatric cohort of 139 patients with chronic urticaria (CU) (hives) between 2013 and 2015 in a single tertiary care center and assessed the comorbidities, the rate of resolution and determined predictors of resolution.

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