GERD Associated With Increased Risk of Malignancy of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Edward D. McCoul, MD, MPH Ochsner Medical Center

Dr. McCoul

Dr. Edward D. McCoul, MD, MPH
Ochsner Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Population-level data suggests a link between gastroesophageal reflux disease and cancer of the throat and sinuses in adults over 65 years of age.  T

he strength of association between reflux and cancer is strongest for anatomic sites closest to the esophagus, where acid and other stomach contents may have the greatest exposure.

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PPIs for Reflux Linked To Increased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Charat Thongprayoon, MD

Bassett Medical Center
Cooperstown, NY 13326

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We conducted a meta-analysis including 5 observational studies with 536,902 patients to assess the risks of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and/or end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) in patients who are taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and/or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs).

We found a statistically significant association between the use of PPI and 1.3-fold increased risk of CKD or ESRD development. Compared with H2Ras, the use of proton pump inhibitors was significantly associated with 1.3-fold higher risk for CKD development.

Conversely, there was no significant association between the use of H2RAs and chronic kidney disease.

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Non-Surgical Stretta Therapy For Recalcitrant GERD

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Mark Noar Director of The Heartburn and Reflux Study Center Towson, MD

Dr. Mark Noar

Dr. Mark Noar
Director of The Heartburn and Reflux Study Center
Towson, MD 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this study was developed out of a need to know whether the Stretta procedure was effective in both the short and long-term in all forms of reflux. This included standard refluxing patients who had never had surgery but also in the subpopulation of patients who had recurring reflux after having had reflux corrective surgery. The question to be answered was whether the Stretta procedure would be less effective, more effective, or just as effective in the patient who had had prior surgery compared to patients who did not have surgery.

The main findings were that independent of whether a patient had had surgery for the correction of reflux or just had standard reflux without prior surgery, the Stretta procedure was equally effective in all patient subgroups both in the short-term and the long-term.

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Surgery for GERD May Improve Reflux But Risks Complications

John Maret-Ouda  MD,  PhD candidateMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
John Maret-Ouda  MD,  PhD candidate
Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery
Department of Molecular medicine and Surgery
Karolinska Institutet
Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Maret-Ouda : This review is part of the BMJ series “Uncertainties pages”, where clinically relevant, but debated, medical questions are highlighted and discussed. The present study is assessing treatment of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, where the current treatment options are medical (proton-pump inhibitors) or surgical (laparoscopic antireflux surgery). The clinical decision-making is often left to the clinician and local guidelines. We evaluated the existing literature to compare the two treatment options regarding reflux control, complications, future risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, health related quality of life, and cost effectiveness.

The main findings were that surgery might provide slightly better reflux control and health related quality of life, but is associated with higher risks of complications compared to medication. A possible preventive effect regarding oesophageal adenocarcinoma remains uncertain. Regarding cost effectiveness, medication seems more cost effective in the short term, but surgery might be more cost effective in the longer term. Since medication provides good treatment of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, but with lower risks of complications, this remains the first line treatment option.

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Acid Reflux More Frequent During Naps than Nighttime Sleep

Ronnie Fass, M.D., FACG, Professor of Medicine Case Western Reserve University Director, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Head, Esophageal and Swallowing Center, Metro Health Medical Center Cleveland, OHMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ronnie Fass, M.D., FACG, Professor of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Director, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Head, Esophageal and Swallowing Center, Metro Health Medical Center
Cleveland, OH

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Fass: This is the first study to compare the extent of acid reflux between nighttime sleep and daytime naps in patients with Gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of our study show that naps are associated with significantly greater esophageal acid exposure compared to sleep. Acid reflux events were more frequent and their total duration was longer during naps when compared with acid reflux events during nighttime sleep. Additionally, the fraction of time that the subjects were experiencing acid reflux with pH < 4 was significantly higher during naps than nighttime sleep and subjects experienced more symptoms due to acid reflux during their nap than their sleep.

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