Osteoporosis: Improving Bone Mineral Density Postmenopause with Monoclonal Antibody Romosozumab

Michael McClung, MD Founding Director, Oregon Osteoporosis Center 5050 NE Hoyt Street, Suite 626 Portland, OR 97213MedicalResearch.com Interview with
Michael McClung, MD
Founding Director, Oregon Osteoporosis Center
5050 NE Hoyt Street, Suite 626
Portland, OR 97213


MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. McClung: In this Phase 2 trial, each of five romosozumab dose regimens significantly increased BMD compared with pooled placebo groups at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck regions (all p<0.001). The largest increases were observed with the romosozumab 210 mg once-monthly dose, with mean increases, compared with baseline, of 11.3 percent at the lumbar spine, 4.1 percent at the total hip and 3.7 percent at the femoral neck.
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High Coffee Consumption: Small Decrease Bone Density, No Increase Fracture Risk

Helena Hallström Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, OrthopaedicsMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Helena Hallström Ph.D., M.Sc. (Toxicology)
Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Orthopedics
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden and
Risk and Benefit Assessment Department National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.

 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: The aim of the study was to investigate whether high consumption of coffee is associated with osteoporosis and development of osteoporotic fractures, since results from previous fracture studies regarding potential associations between coffee drinking and fracture risk are inconsistent. The longitudinal population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort, including 61,433 women born between 1914 and 1948, was followed from 1987 through 2008. Coffee consumption was assessed with repeated food frequency questionnaires. During follow-up, 14,738 women experienced any type of fracture and of these 3,871 had a hip fracture. In a sub-cohort (n=5,022), bone density was measured and osteoporosis was determined (n=1,012). There was no evidence of a higher rate of any fracture or hip fracture with increasing coffee consumption. However, a high coffee intake (≥4 cups) in comparison with a low intake (<1 cup) was associated with a 2-4% reduction in bone mineral density (BMD), depending on site (p<0.001), but the odds ratio of osteoporosis was only 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.88, 1.87). Thus, high coffee consumption was associated with a small reduction in bone density that did not translate into an increased risk of fracture.
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