Mutations Linked to Scarring Hair Loss in African American Women Identified

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Cicatricial Alopecia Courtesy of Dr. Amy McMichael MD The Department of Dermatology Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Cicatricial Alopecia
Courtesy of Dr. Amy McMichael MD
The Department of Dermatology
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Winston-SalemNorth Carolina

Eli Sprecher MD PhD
Professor and Chair, Division of Dermatology
Deputy Director General for R&D and Innovation
Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center
Frederick Reiss Chair of Dermatology
Sackler Faculty of Medicine
Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel and

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a form of hair loss (alopecia) which is extremely common and affects one in every 20 women of African origin. It starts usually during the fourth decade of life. Because it can be inherited from mothers to their children, it is thought to have a genetic basis. On the other hand, it is known to mainly affect women who use to groom their hair intensively. Thus it was thought that the disease stems from some form of inherited susceptibility to the damage incurred to the hair follicle by grooming habits.

In the study we published, we searched for the genetic basis of CCCA.

In contrast with the common form of alopecia (androgenetic alopecia or female pattern alopecia), CCCA is associated with scarring of the scalp skin, which means that once hair is lost, it will likely not re-grow.

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Experimental Cap Regrows Hair Using Photostimulation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
photostimulation of hair growthHan Eol Lee Ph.D.
Flexible and Nanobio Device Lab.
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
KAIST

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Numerous people around the world have suffered from alopecia, which leads to aesthetic issues, low self-esteem, and social anxiety. With the population expansion alopecia patients from middle-age down even to the twenties, a depilation treatment is expected to have social and medical impacts on billions of patients. The causes of alopecia are generally known to be heredity, mental stress, aging, and elevated male hormone. Therapeutic techniques such as thermal, electrical, pharmacological, and optical stimulation have been proposed to treat hair problems. Among them, laser stimulation to hair-lost regions is a promising technique, activating the anagen phase and the proliferation of hair follicles without side effects. However, this laser stimulation technique has drawbacks, such as high power consumption, large size, and restrictive use in daily life (e.g., the difficulty of microscale spatial control and the long time exposure of high-energy laser).  Continue reading

Cooling System Can Prevent Hair Loss During Chemotherapy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Julie Rani Nangia, M.D. Assistant Professor Breast Center - Clinic Baylor College of Medicine Houston, TX, US

Dr. Julie Nangia

Julie Rani Nangia, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Breast Center – Clinic
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX, US

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study was fueled by the feedback from women undergoing chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. One of the most distressing side effects of their treatment is hair loss. It robs them of their anonymity and, for many, their femininity. Scalp cooling therapy has been available for a few years in the UK, but has faced obstacles in FDA clearance in the states. The makers of the scalp cooling device used in this study, Paxman Coolers Ltd., have a personal connection to breast cancer, as the company founder’s wife passed away from the disease.

This was the first randomized scalp cooling study, and it shows that the Paxman Hair Loss Prevention System is an effective therapy for reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia. The results show a 50% increase in hair preservation of grade 0 or 1, meaning use of a scarf or wig is not necessary, in patients who received the scalp cooling therapy as opposed to those who did not.

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Immunotherapy Tofacitinib Can Halt Alopecia Areata

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Morton Scheinberg, MD, PhD
From Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein and Hospital AACD,
São Paulo, and
Clinica Dermatosineida, Maringa, Parana, Brazil.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: That universal hair loss associated with a localized autoimmune reaction on the cells involved with the hair follicles can be halted with tofacitinib.

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Study Finds Hair Transplantation Improves Attractiveness in Men With Male Pattern Baldness

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lisa Earnest Ishii, M.D. Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryJohns Hopkins School of Medicine Baltimore Maryland 21287

Dr. Lisa Ishii

Lisa Earnest Ishii, M.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryJohns Hopkins School of Medicine
Baltimore Maryland 21287

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Hair transplantation for men suffering from male pattern hair loss is a common procedure to improve their appearance. However, to the best of our knowledge the impact of the procedure for men with hair loss had never been clearly demonstrated.

We showed, for the first time, that men who undergo the procedure can have real improvements in attractiveness, age, and the appearance of successfulness as perceived by the casual observer in society.

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Male Pattern Baldness Linked To Increased Risk of Colon Polyps

Dr. Nana Keum, PhD Department of Nutrition Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Boston, MA

Dr. NaNa Keum

More on Colon Cancer on MedicalResearch.com
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Nana Keum, PhD
Department of Nutrition
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Boston, MA

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Keum: Male pattern baldness, the most common type of hair loss in men, is positively associated with androgens as well as IGF-1 and insulin, all of which are implicated in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia.  Therefore, it is biologically plausible that male pattern baldness, as a marker of underlying aberration in the regulation of the aforementioned hormones, may be associated with colorectal neoplasia.  In our study that examined the relationship between five male hair pattern at age 45 years (no-baldness, frontal-only-baldness, frontal-plus-mild-vertex-baldness, frontal-plus-moderate-vertex-baldness, and frontal-plus-severe-vertex-baldness) and the risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer, we found that frontal-only-baldness and frontal-plus-mild-vertex-baldness were associated with approximately 30% increased risk of colon cancer relative to no-baldness.  Frontal-only-baldness was also positively associated with colorectal adenoma.

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Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men

MEDICALRESEARCH.COM INTERVIEW WITH

Charnita Zeigler-Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Research Assistant Professor CCEB
University of Pennsylvania

MEDICALRESEARCH.COM: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Zeigler-Johnson: The main findings of the study are:

  • Younger African-American men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer at an early age (under the age of 60) are more likely to have had a personal history of early-onset baldness (baldness by age 30.)
  • For older patients, this is not necessarily the case, and future studies will need to focus on which factors place men in this age group at risk for prostate cancer.
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