Just a Picture of Coffee Can Give Your Heart Rate, and Brain, a Lift

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Eugene Chan, PhD
Senior Lecturer in Marketing
Monash Business School
Monash University Australia and 

Sam Maglio PhD
Associate Professor of Marketing
Department of Management
University of Toronto 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: The physiological effects of coffee and caffeine consumption have been well-studied, but we were interested in the psychological effects.

Especially in Western societies, there is a mental association between coffee and arousal – that coffee is an arousing beverage. This led us to ask, might this association itself produce the psychological “lift” without actually drinking beverages? We found that it does.

Merely seeing pictures of coffee or thinking about coffee can increase arousal, heart rates, and make people more focused. The effects are not as strong as actually drinking coffee of course, but they are still noticeable.

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No Benefit, More Complications with Hypothermia after Traumatic Brain Injury

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jamie Cooper AO BMBS MD FRACP FCICM FAHMS Professor of Intensive Care Medicine Monash University Deputy Director & Head of Research,  Intensive Care & Hyperbaric Medicine The Alfred, Melbourne

Prof. Cooper

Jamie Cooper AO
BMBS MD FRACP FCICM FAHMS
Professor of Intensive Care Medicine
Monash University
Deputy Director & Head of Research,
Intensive Care & Hyperbaric Medicine
The Alfred, Melbourne

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: 50-60 million people each year suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) . When the injury is severe only one half are able to live independently afterwards.

Cooling the brain (hypothermia) is often used in intensive care units for decades to  decrease inflammation and brain swelling and hopefully to improve outcomes, but clinical staff have had uncertainty whether benefits outweigh complications.

We conducted the largest randomised trial of hypothermia in TBI, in 500 patients, in 6 countries, called POLAR. We started cooling by ambulance staff, to give hypothermia the best chance to benefit patients. We continued for 3-7 days in hospital ind ICU. We measured functional outcomes at 6 months.

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