Dexmedetomidine Reduced Risk of Delirium

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Yoanna Skrobik MD FRCP(c) MSc McGill University Health Centre Canada

Dr. Skrobik

Yoanna Skrobik MD FRCP(c) MSc
McGill University Health Centre
Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: My clinical research interests revolve around critical care analgesia, sedation, and delirium. I validated the first delirium screening tool in mechanically ventilated ICU patients (published in 2001), described ICU delirium risk factors, associated outcomes, compared treatment modalities and described pharmacological exposure for the disorder. I was invited to participate in the 2013 Society of Critical Care Medicine Pain, Anxiety, and Delirium management guidelines, and served as the vice-chair for the recently completed Pain, Agitation, Delirium, Early Mobility and Sleep upcoming guidelines.

Until this study, no pharmacological prevention or intervention could convincingly be considered effective in ICU delirium. Although Haloperidol and other antipsychotics are frequently used in practice, their lack of efficacy and possible disadvantages are increasingly being understood.

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General Anesthesia vs Conscious Sedation for Endovascular Therapy of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Claus Z. Simonsen, MD, PhD Department of Neurology Aarhus University Hospital

Dr. Simonsen

Dr. Claus Z. Simonsen, MD, PhD
Department of Neurology
Aarhus University Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Retrospective studies find worse outcome when performing (Endovascular Therapy) EVT under General Anesthesia (GA).

The main finding is that infarct growth in the Conscious Sedation (CS) and GA are not different. And that patients who had EVT under GA had a better outcome after 90 days. This is probably explained by better reperfusion rates under GA which was another part of the study that was surprising. Our neurointerventionalist are comfortable performing EVT under CS, but our study indicates that maybe it is easier to achieve reperfusion it the patient is anesthesized.

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Fewer Patients Receiving Opioids Alone Following Hip or Knee Replacement

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Philipp Gerner

MD Candidate – Class of 2018
University of Massachusetts Medical School

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Over 1 million patients undergo total joint replacement surgery in the United States alone every year, with many experiencing significant pain postoperatively. These procedures often require large amounts of pain medication to keep patients comfortable, which historically has been treated with opioids. Currently, increasing awareness of safe opioid prescribing has created an increased interest in other ways to effectively treat post-operative pain without the dangers and side-effects of opioids.

As part of an analysis of the impact of multimodal pain management (i.e. multiple drug classes or procedures to treat post-operative pain) and opioid usage, we conducted this study to considered how trends have changed over the last 10 years. Our data shows that opioid use for post-operative pain has declined substantially in patients undergoing total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA & TKA), two very common and often painful orthopedic procedures. Patients being treated with opioids alone for THA decreased from 47.6% in 2006 to 7.5% in 2016, with similar trends being seen in TKA patients.

Importantly, our data also showed that patients are increasingly being treated with a multimodal approach to pain control; especially patients being treated with 3 or more different pain modalities increased sharply in the last 10 years for both procedures in our study. This allows patients the benefit of managing their pain without many of the side-effect associated with large doses of a single pain medication. This trend was found to be especially true in small and medium sized hospitals, compared to larger hospitals. With increasing emphasis on limiting opioid use, this data shows us that the medical community is actively pursuing alternate possibilities for successfully treating post-operative pain.

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Virtual Cartoon Technology Can Ease Pediatric Anxiety in OR Before Anesthesia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Sunghee Han
Professor
Seoul National Unversity College of Medicine
Seoul National University Hospital
Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicin

What is the background for this new technology and study? What are the main findings?

Response: The time from patient arrival in the operating theatre to induction of general anesthesia is one of the most stressful moments for children undergoing surgery. Various strategies such as ‘pre-operative guided operating room tour’ or ‘therapeutic play intervention’ have been developed in order to reduce children’s pre-operative anxiety. Although these existing simulation-based approaches may be effective, they have not been widely used in real clinical settings with limited budget and resources such as manpower and space.

Virtual Reality(VR), a relatively new technology in the field of healthcare, can allow the user to experience an immersive environment. In this study, using VR technology, we provided the children with a realistic trip to the operating theatre accompanied by ‘My best friend’ Pororo. “Pororo, The Little Penguin” is a very famous cartoon character in Korea and Asia. Most children in Korea watch Pororo in TV, play with Pororo toys since early yeas and perceive Pororo as a ‘close friend’. In the VR content used in this study, Pororo acts as a patient and is subjected to anesthesia and surgery himself. Pororo kindly brings his friend(the viewer; paediatric patient) to the theatre and shows all that is going on in there.

Intervention with the VR content was able to reduce the level of anxiety in paediatric patients and promote collaborative behavior and acceptance of the invasive procedures, especially general anesthesia. Parental satisfaction level was also relatively higher in the VR group.

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Large Trial Evaluates Inhaled Nitric oxide on Survival Without Pulmonary Dysplasia in Preterm Infants

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Shabih U. Hasan, MD, DCH, FRCPC Professor and Staff Neonatologist, Alberta Health Services Department of Pediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine University of Calgary

Dr. Hasan

Shabih U. Hasan, MD, DCH, FRCPC
Professor and Staff Neonatologist, Alberta Health Services
Department of Pediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine
University of Calgary

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Approximately 8% of all infants are born prematurely (preterm birth <37 weeks postmenstrual age). Preterm infants have many challenges including establishment of adequate pulmonary gas exchange. Due to not yet fully developed lungs, preterm infants require respiratory support consisting of respirators and other forms of non-invasive ventilation modalities and supplemental oxygen.  Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the commonest morbidity among very low birth weight infants as 40% of survivors at postmenstrual age <30 weeks develop BPD. This is a serious condition as it can lead to short- and long-term pulmonary complications, increased hospital visits and neurodevelopmental impairment. BPD is defined where preterm infants require respiratory support and/or supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age.

A number of therapeutic and non-therapeutic modalities have been used to prevent BPD including inhaled nitric oxide (iNO).  In 2006, the NO CLD trial demonstrated that iNO prevented BPD (Relative benefit 1.81; CI 1.27-2.59, P = 0.006) if used according to the NO CLD Protocol (Ballard et al., New England Journal of Medicine, 355:343-353, 2006). Our study (NEWNO; Newborns treated with Nitric Oxide) was designed to replicate the NO CLD study.
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Risk Factors for Adverse Events in Emergency Procedural Pediatric Sedation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Maala Bhatt MD, MSc., FRCPC Director, Pediatric Emergency Research Staff Physician, Emergency Medicine  Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario

Dr. Bhatt

Maala Bhatt MD, MSc., FRCPC
Director, Pediatric Emergency Research
Staff Physician, Emergency Medicine
Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Procedural sedation, defined as the administration of medications to minimize pain and awareness, has become standard practice in pediatric emergency departments worldwide to facilitate short, painful procedures such as orthopedic reduction and complex laceration repairs. Although emergency department sedation is regarded as safe, serious adverse events have been reported. The incidence of these events has been difficult to determine due to the infrequency of their occurrence and lack of large, multi-center surveillance studies focused on systematic detection of adverse events. Previous studies of emergency department sedation have been limited by single-center design and small sample sizes. These studies have not been able to reliably predict sedation-related adverse events, their severity or impact on patients.

To improve understanding of the safety and comparative effectiveness of ED procedural sedation, we conducted a large multi-center cohort study using standardized outcome measures that are valid and relevant to clinical practice. Our primary objective was to determine which practices lead to the best outcomes in children undergoing emergency department procedural sedation.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: We enrolled 6,295 patients undergoing parenteral procedural sedation for a painful procedure in one of six Canadian pediatric emergency departments from July 2010 to February 2015.

The overall incidence of adverse events in our population was 11.7%. Oxygen desaturation (5.6%) and vomiting (5.2%) were the most common events. Serious adverse events and significant interventions in response to an adverse event were rare occurring in only 1.1% and 1.4% of patients respectively.

We found that choice of sedation medication had the biggest impact on the incidence of adverse events and need for significant interventions in response to those events. The incidence of serious adverse events and significant interventions was lowest among patients sedated with ketamine-alone and highest among patients sedated with combination drugs ketamine+propofol and ketamine+fentanyl. We also found that pre-procedural opioid administration was strongly associated with increased odds of oxygen desaturation, vomiting and need for significant interventions, regardless of sedation medication.

Higher doses of ketamine were associated with increased odds of oxygen desaturation and vomiting. These findings are in opposition to the common belief that ketamine does not exhibit a dose-response relationship.

We also found that pre-procedural anti-emetics were associated with a 50% reduction in the odds of vomiting. However, based on published evidence, use in children under five years may not be as advantageous as their baseline risk is much lower.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Procedural sedation for children provided by Emergency Physicians in these tertiary care pediatric emergency departments is safe and effective with low rates of serious adverse events (1.1%) and significant interventions (1.4%). Ketamine, Ketamine and Propofol and Propofol alone are all effective and safe in the hands of competent/experienced providers, however using ketamine alone is associated with fewer serious adverse events and significant interventions.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Our finding that administering opioids prior to sedation increases the odds of oxygen desaturation, vomiting and the need for significant interventions is interesting. Future work could focus on the timing of opioid administration and the incidence of adverse events. We are also interesting in understanding the longer term effects of sedation medications, controlling for age.

Disclosures: This study was supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Team Grant in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Bhatt M, Johnson DW, Chan J, Taljaard M, Barrowman N, Farion KJ, Ali S, Beno S, Dixon A, McTimoney CM, Dubrovsky AS, Sourial N, Roback MG, for the Sedation Safety Study Group of Pediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC). Risk Factors for Adverse Events in Emergency Department Procedural Sedation for Children. JAMA Pediatr. Published online August 21, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.2135

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combination Opioids and Benzodiazepines Raises Risk of Overdose

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric C Sun MD PhD, assistant professor Department of Anesthesiology Perioperative and Pain Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA

Dr. Eric Sun

Eric C Sun MD PhD, assistant professor
Department of Anesthesiology
Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There have been large increases in opioid-related adverse events over the past decade. The goal of our study was to examine the extent to which these increases may have been driven by combined use of opioids and benzodiazepines, a combination that is known to be potentially risky. Overall, we found that the combined use of opioids and benzodiazepines nearly doubled (80% increase) between 2001 and 2013, and that opioid users who also used benzodiazepines were at a higher risk of an opioid-related adverse event. Indeed, our results suggest eliminating the combined use of opioids and benzodiazepines could have reduced the population risk of an opioid-related adverse event by 15%.

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New Scoring System Guides Surgical Risks During Pregnancy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Adam Sachs MD

Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
University of Connecticut School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: When women undergo appendectomy or cholecystectomy during pregnancy they are obviously concerned about the well being of their fetus. Unfortunately, the majority of the data available to council pregnant women is outdated and medical practice has significantly changed since their publication.

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Over 1/3 of Anesthesia Now Delivered Outside of Traditional Operating Rooms

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Richard Dutton, MD

Chief quality officer
U.S. Anesthesia Partners
Dallas

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We wanted to document the change in national anesthesia practice over the past 5 years, specifically the increase in non-operating room anesthesia NORA. We found that non-operating room anesthesia now accounts for more than 1/3 of all anesthetics. The proportion continues to rise as minimally invasive procedures are developed in gastroenterology, cardiology, radiology and other non-surgical disciplines. These procedures are often performed in complex patients, and require anesthesia involvement to facilitate.

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Liposomal Bupivacaine Infiltration Reduced Costs and Opioid Use in TKA Surgery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Bryan Sakamoto MD, PhD
Department of Anesthesia
Richard L. Roudebush, Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Department of Anesthesia
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, Indiana

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Liposomal bupivacaine is a novel extended-duration anesthetic that has recently become a popular option in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for post-operative pain management. Although liposomal bupivacaine is widely used, it is unknown if the benefits justify the cost in the veteran population at our institution. The main purpose of this medication use study was to evaluate the cost verses benefit of using this agent in our veteran patient population.

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