Exercise - Fitness, Ophthalmology / 07.05.2021

Are you a loving parent with a passion for helping your kids achieve the best that they can? It is only natural to want what is best for your family, so it is important to keep an eye on your physical and mental health to create a positive environment for your children to thrive in. As the coronavirus pandemic continues to necessitate restrictions around the world, parents everywhere are being forced to help their children learn from home. If you are starting to feel overwhelmed by the stress of the pandemic — and modern life in general — here are a few tips to help you stay positive and healthy so that you can provide your kids with the best care and attention possible.

Create a Timetable

timetable-schedule Having a reliable routine to adhere to is great way to ensure that you can keep things in perspective. You might just find that the secret benefits of a great timetable make all the difference when it comes to your daily well-being. Designating time for a break within your timetable can give you something to look forward to, while also providing a timeframe in which to achieve your current tasks. Making space for breaks can also be helpful when it comes to alleviating feelings like monotony and apathy. (more…)
Author Interviews, Emory, Genetic Research, JAMA, Ophthalmology / 24.01.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Eldon E. Geisert, PhD Professor of Ophthalmology Emory School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: In the late 1990s a group of doctors began a study of glaucoma patients to determine if there were phenotypes that are predictive for developing glaucoma. In this Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) one of the highly correlated ocular traits was central corneal thickness (CCT). The early clinical studies found that people with thinner corneas were at a higher risk of developing glaucoma. In two large studies, examining thousands of people a number of genes were identified that were risk factors for glaucoma or that controlled CCT in humans. In both cases the identified genes accounted for less than 10% of the genetic risk for glaucoma and less than for 10% of the genetic control for CCT. There was little data linking the genetic control of CCT to the glaucoma risk. Our group has taken an indirect approach to the question, using well-defined mouse genetic system to identify genes modulating CCT and then interrogating human glaucoma data to determine if these genes are associated with glaucoma risk. (more…)
Author Interviews, Environmental Risks, NYU, Ophthalmology / 08.12.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Cassandra Thiel, PhD Assistant Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Opthamology at NYU Langone Health, and Assistant Professor at NYU Wagner and NYU Tandon School of Engineering MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Everyone is concerned about the health impacts of climate change, from the United Nations to the Lancet. While other industries are trying to monitor and minimize their environmental footprint, healthcare services have been largely overlooked. Yet, the US healthcare sector emits 10% of the US’s total greenhouse gases. Cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the world. In the US, these surgeries generate large quantities of waste due to the use of single-use, disposable materials and supplies. However, at Aravind Eye Care System in southern India, the outcomes for this procedure are the same as in the US, but the materials they use are mostly reusable. This study assessed the environmental footprint of Aravind’s surgical process, to determine how their process design and material selection affected their emissions. (more…)
Author Interviews, JAMA, Surgical Research / 26.11.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Brian C. Stagg, MD Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences University of Michigan Medical School National Clinician Scholars Program University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation Joshua D. Stein, MD, MS Associate Professor University of Michigan Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences Director, Center for Eye Policy and Innovation Ann Arbor MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Cataract surgery is one of the most common surgeries in the US. It is typically performed at either hospital outpatient departments (HOPDs) or ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). ASCs are cheaper and more efficient, but some people believe that HOPDs may be safer for people with co-morbid medical conditions. We conducted this study to evaluate how the use of ambulatory surgery centers for cataract and other ocular surgeries has changed since 2001. We also wanted to see what factors influenced whether or not a patient had cataract surgery at an ASC (versus a HOPD), and to compare ASC use for cataract surgery with ASC use for other common eye surgeries (glaucoma, cornea, retina, strabismus). (more…)
Author Interviews, JAMA, Menopause, Ophthalmology, UCLA / 31.10.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Anne L. Coleman, MD, PhD Center for Community Outreach and Policy, Stein Eye Institute David Geffen School of Medicine Director, UCLA Mobile Eye Clinic Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health UCLA MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Cataracts are a leading cause of vision loss worldwide, and cataract surgery is an intervention that is known to be extremely effective to address the vision loss related to cataract. However, it is unclear if there are benefits of cataract surgery beyond vision improvement in people with cataracts. Previous studies have suggested that in addition to improving vision, cataract surgery may decrease the risk of fractures and accidents, improve mental health, and improve overall quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate the potential benefits of cataract surgery and to determine if cataract surgery was associated with increased survival in people with cataracts. (more…)
Author Interviews, Exercise - Fitness, Karolinski Institute, Ophthalmology / 04.10.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jinjin Zheng Selin, MSc Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology Institute of Environmental Medicine Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Response: Our results suggest that higher levels of total physical activity, especially in the long-term, as well as specific types of physical activity including walking/bicycling and work/occupational activity, may be associated with decreased risk of age-related cataract among middle-aged and elderly women and men. On the other side, high levels of leisure time inactivity may be associated with increased risk of cataract. (more…)
Author Interviews, JAMA, Ophthalmology, Smoking / 14.01.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Birgitta Ejdervik Lindblad, MD PhD Department of Ophthalmology Örebro University Hospital Örebro, Sweden MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: We have investigated the association between smoking cessation and risk of having a cataract extraction among 44 371 Swedish men aged 45-79 years. During 12 years of follow up we identified 5713 incident cases of cataract extraction. Smoking cessation significantly decreased the risk with time. Men who currently smoked more than 15 cigarettes per day had a 42 % increased risk of cataract extraction compared with men who had never smoked. More than 20 years since quitting smoking, men who had smoked more than 15 cigarettes per day had a 21% increased risk of having a cataract extraction compared with men who had never smoked. The effect of smoking cessation was observed earlier among men who smoked less than 15 cigarettes per day but more than 2 decades since smoking cessation the risk had not decreased to the level of never smokers. (more…)