AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 13.08.2014

Susan Cheng MD Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, MA 02115MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Susan Cheng MD Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, MA 02115   Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Cheng: We've known for some time that smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity all contribute to a person’s risk of being at risk for heart disease. The goal of our study was to look back over the last two decades and see how we've been doing in reducing the impact of these major cardiovascular risk factors on the actual risk for developing heart and vascular disease. We found that, not surprisingly, we've been doing generally better over time at lowering the overall impact of some risk factors such as smoking and high cholesterol. On the other hand, the impact of hypertension and diabetes has been high and has remained high over time. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 13.08.2014

Professeur Philippe Gabriel Steg Département de Cardiologie Hôpital Bichat, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, FranceMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professeur Philippe Gabriel Steg Département de Cardiologie Hôpital Bichat, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France Medical Research: What are the main findings of this study? Prof. Philippe Steg:
  • Due to increasing use of angiography and revascularization, as well as improved drug therapy, the prevalence of angina and ischemia has diminished.
  • Most of the events (Cardiovascular death or Myocardial Infarction) occur in patients without angina or ischemia. This is very novel and important and stresses the importance of proper secondary prevention over "testing". We cannot be reassured by having a negative test for angina and ischemia.
  • Additionally, angina appears associated with a consistently greater risk than ischemia alone (having both is worse), so we need to pay attention to angina as a dire prognostic marker.
  • Findings should be no different in the US.
  • Most studies of silent ischemia antedate the advent of modern effective therapies or used very liberal definitions for "silent ischemia". (see our discussion)
(more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, JAMA, Race/Ethnic Diversity / 10.08.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sahil Khera, MD and Dhaval Kolte, MD, PhD Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology New York Medical College, NY Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: We used the publicly available Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases for our study. We analyzed data on 6.5 million patients with heart attack (all types) from 2002 to 2011 in United States. Out of these 3.98 million were admitted with a diagnosis of non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Our objective was to describe how the care for patients with NSTEMI has changed over the past 10 years and whether this has resulted in better patient outcomes. We looked at the proportion of patients with NSTEMI who underwent cardiac catheterization each year. We also studied how many patients died in the hospital, how long was the hospital stay, and what was the total cost of hospitalization for this condition. Lastly, we determined if the changes in treatment and outcomes over the years were similar for different age- groups, men and women, and for different racial/ethnic groups. In this analysis, we looked at cardiac catheterization trends after NSTEMI for both within 24 hours and within 48 hours. This is the first study of its kind to analyze two different time frames of early catheterization simultaneously. Although there was an increase in the proportion of patients with NSTEMI with increase in utilization of early cardiac catheterization and decrease in in-hospital death and length of stay, age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-specific differences in the management and outcomes of NSTEMI were observed, and further studies are needed to develop strategies to ensure more equitable care for patients with this type of heart attack. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Biomarkers, Heart Disease / 08.08.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Rakesh K. Mishra, MD San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center San Francisco, CA 94121. Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Mishra: Increased levels of both BNP and NT-proBNP are associated with elevated risk of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, when added to existing clinical models of risk, NT-proBNP is superior to BNP for risk reclassification. (more…)
Author Interviews, General Medicine, Heart Disease, JAMA / 06.08.2014

Maurizio Gasparini, MDMedicalResearch Interview with: Maurizio Gasparini MD Humanitas Research Hospital Rozzano, Italy Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Gasparini: We found that a strategic programming of implantable cardioverter defibrillators which allows the non-sustained arrhythmias to self-terminate is associated with reductions in hospitalizations, length of hospital stay and cost per patient-year and an increase in the time to first hospitalization. These results were mainly driven by reduction in cardiovascular-related events. (more…)
Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Menopause / 03.08.2014

S. Mitchell Harman, M.D., Ph.D. CAPT US Public Health Service, retired Professor, Clinical Medicine, U of AZ College of Medicine Interim Chief, Dept. of Internal Medicine Chair, IRB Subcommitee Phoenix VA Health Care System Phoenix, AZ 85012-1892MedicalResearch.com Interview with: S. Mitchell Harman, M.D., Ph.D. CAPT US Public Health Service, retired Professor, Clinical Medicine, U of AZ College of Medicine Interim Chief, Dept. of Internal Medicine Chair, IRB Subcommitee Phoenix VA Health Care System Phoenix, AZ 85012-1892 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Harman: The major findings are: 1.       Neither transdermal nor oral estrogen treatment significantly accelerates or decelerates rate of change of carotid artery intimal medial thickness (CIMT) in healthy recently menopausal women. 2.       Both estrogen treatments have some potentially beneficial effects on markers of CVD risk, but these differ depending on the route of estrogen delivery with improvements in LDL and HDL cholesterol seen with oral, and reduced insulin resistance with transdermal. 3.       No significant effects were observed on rate of accumulation of coronary artery calcium. 4.       Women reported significant relief of vasomotor (hot flush) symptoms with both estrogen treatments (more…)
Author Interviews, BMJ, Heart Disease, Nutrition / 31.07.2014

Prof. Frank B Hu Department of Nutrition Department of Epidemiology Harvard School of Public HealthMedicalResearch.com Interview Invitation Prof. Frank B Hu Department of Nutrition Department of Epidemiology Harvard School of Public Health Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. Hu: We found that increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risk of mortality, especially cardiovascular mortality. The largest reduction in mortality can be achieved at 5 servings per day of fruits and vegetables. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Tobacco Research / 28.07.2014

Gabriel Arefalk Department of Medical Sciences Uppsala University Hospital Uppsala, SwedenMedicalResearch.com: Interview with: Gabriel Arefalk Department of Medical Sciences Uppsala University Hospital Uppsala, Sweden Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: In this prospective cohort study, we investigated mortality risk in 2474 smokeless tobacco users who had been hospitalized for a myocardial infarction between the years of 2005-2009 in Sweden. We used a nationwide quality register and database called SWEDEHEART and found that those who stopped using snus (the Swedish type of snuff) after their MI had half the risk of dying during follow up relative to those who continued to use snus. This association, which was of the same magnitude as for smoking cessation, seemed to be independent of age, gender and smoking habits, as well as of many other relevant covariates. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, JAMA / 27.07.2014

Dr. Danny Dvir MD St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver British Columbia, CanadaMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Danny Dvir MD St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver British Columbia, Canada Medical Research: Who were the patients studied? Dr. Dvir: The VIVID registry included high-risk patients with failed aortic bioprostheses treated with valve-in-valve. These patients had many comorbidities and high risk scores for early mortality with conventional redo surgery. Medical Research: What are the treatment options for these patients? Dr. Dvir: Patients with failed bioprosthetic valves are conventionally treated with redo surgery. Transcatheter valve-in-valve is a less-invasive approach. (more…)
Author Interviews, Gender Differences, Heart Disease, JACC, Transplantation / 25.07.2014

Dr. Eileen Hsich MD Director of the Women’s Heart Failure Clinic Associate Medical Director for the Heart Transplant Program Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OhioMedicalResearch.com Interview Invitation  Dr. Eileen Hsich MD Director of the Women’s Heart Failure Clinic Associate Medical Director for the Heart Transplant Program Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Hsich: Women are dying on the heart transplant waiting list at a faster rate than men for almost a decade (see Figure 1) and few studies have even addressed this problem. The occurrence is largely driven by gender differences in survival at the most urgent status (UNOS Status 1A) but the cause remains unclear. Although data is limited our findings raise concern that women are not successfully bridged to transplantation while they remain at high status and are inactivated due to worsening condition. Figure 1. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: Mortality on Waiting List For Heart Transplantation Heart waiting list by gender 2000-2009   Figure derived from table in Scientific registry of transplant recipients: Heart waiting list by gender 2000-2009. Available at: Http://srtr.Transplant.Hrsa.Gov/annual_reports/2010/1103_can-gender_hr.Htm accessed january 9, 2014. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Heart Disease / 23.07.2014

Reza Robati, MD Associate Professor of Dermatology Deputy editor, Iranian Journal of Dermatology Skin Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Tehran, IranMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Reza Robati, MD Associate Professor of Dermatology Deputy editor, Iranian Journal of Dermatology Skin Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Tehran, Iran Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Robati: In our study, increased levels of serum leptin and resistin and increased intima-media wall thickness of common carotid artery were observed in 60 psoriasis patients in comparison with 60 healthy controls. Moreover, we found positive correlation between these variables in psoriasis patients. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, OBGYNE / 22.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Donna Parker, Sc.D., FAHA Director of Community Health and Research Center for Primary Care and Prevention Memorial Hospital of RI Pawtucket, RI 02860 MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: The main findings of the study are that women with a history of one or more miscarriages or one or more stillbirths appear to be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We found that the multivariable adjusted odds ratio for coronary heart disease for one or more stillbirths was 1.27 (95 percent CI, 1.07-1.51) compared with no stillbirth; for women with a history of one miscarriage, the odds ratio was 1.19 (95 percent CI, 1.08-1.32); and for women with a history of two or more miscarriages, the odds ratio was 1.18 (95 percent CI, 1.04-1.34) compared with no miscarriage. However, we did not find a significant association of ischemic stroke and pregnancy loss. The association between pregnancy loss and CHD appeared to be independent of hypertension, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio and white blood cell count. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Gender Differences, Heart Disease, JACC, Yale / 22.07.2014

Aakriti Gupta, MD, MBBS  Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, ConnecticutMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Aakriti Gupta, MD, MBBS Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut Medical Research: What were the main findings? Dr. Gupta: Using a national database, we found that heart attack hospitalization rates for patients under the age of 55 have not declined in the past decade while their Medicare-age counterparts have seen a 20 percent drop. We also found that among younger patients below 55 years of age, women fare worse because they have longer hospital stays, and are more likely to die in the hospital after a heart attack. Young women were also more likely to have higher prevalence of co-existing medical conditions including diabetes, high blood pressure and higher cholesterol levels. Overall, all patient groups in the study saw increases in these conditions including diabetes and high blood pressure in the past decade. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 21.07.2014

Kanako K. Kumamaru, MD PhD Assistant Professor, Departments of Radiology Brigham and Women’s Hospital & Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02446MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kanako K. Kumamaru, MD PhD Assistant Professor, Departments of Radiology Brigham and Women’s Hospital & Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02115 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Kumamaru: When a patient does not have diabetes and had no or ≤25% coronary stenosis in his/her previous coronary CT angiography (CCTA) performed within 3 years, the probability of newly developed coronary artery disease (CAD) is very low, suggesting no repeat CCTA necessary, even if the clinical scenario suggested CCTA to be appropriate. Especially, when coronary arteries were completely normal at the prior scan, no patient underwent subsequent revascularization during the study period. (more…)
Author Interviews, Gender Differences, Heart Disease, Pharmacology / 21.07.2014

Lisa A. McDonnell Program Manager, Prevention & Wellness Centre, Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lisa A. McDonnell Program Manager, Prevention & Wellness Centre, Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: The analysis focuses on a comparison of women’s perceptions of their heart disease knowledge and heart health risk with their self‐reported knowledge and heart health risk status. In summary, it gives insight into the Perceptions vs Reality when it comes to women and their heart health. Heart disease knowledge: For the purposes of measuring knowledge related to heart health, a scoring index was created on which women responding to the survey could score as low as 0 or as high as 40. The overall mean score among women in the survey was 15.0, which is fairly modest given the maximum of 40. In a comparison of actual and perceived heart disease knowledge, 80% of respondents with a low knowledge score perceived that they were moderately or well informed. The risk factors that Canadian women most commonly associate with heart disease are being overweight/having abdominal obesity (ov/ob), physical inactivity, smoking, and lacking fruits/vegetables. Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure account for up to 53% of MI’s, followed by Ov/Ob, psychosocial factors, a lack of physical activity, and a lack of fruits/vegetables. The limited awareness of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as key risk factors is particularly surprising, given that these are key determinants of heart disease. Low awareness of symptomology among women in our survey were noted when comparing the occurrence of symptoms versus their recognition of these symptoms as possibly being related to their heart. Only 4 in 10 women could name chest pain as a symptom of heart disease, and a smaller proportion could identify symptoms including dyspnea, radiating pain, or typical prodromal symptoms. Such shortcomings might contribute to the greater number of unrecognized myocardial infarctions in women than in men, not to mention inappropriate treatment of acute events and premature discharge from emergency care. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 21.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Cheol Whan Lee and Seung-Jung Park Division of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan Seoul, Korea Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: The time window of DES (drug-eluting stent) failure is widely variable from soon after DES implantation to several years after DES implantation. We observed patients with late DES failure are commonly presented with acute coronary syndrome. We hypothesized that temporal patterns of DES failure may be different, and analyzed all patients with first DES failure at our institution. We found that late drug-eluting stent failure is more likely to progress to acute myocardial infarction, aggressive angiographic patterns, and worse outcomes following retreatment. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Red Meat / 17.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr inz. Joanna Kaluza Department of Human Nutrition Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW Warsaw POLAND Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Response: The most important finding of my study is the fact that processed red meat consumption, but not unprocessed red meat, increases a risk of Heart Failure incidence and Heart Failure mortality. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Lipids, NEJM / 17.07.2014

Professor Jane Armitage Professor of Clinical Trials and Epidemiology Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford Cardiovascular Science Oxford, United KingdomMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Jane Armitage Professor of Clinical Trials and Epidemiology Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford Cardiovascular Science Oxford, United Kingdom Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. Armitage: The study showed that adding extended release niacin with laropiprant (to reduce the flushing) to standard treatment including statins in people with heart disease or strokes did not improve their outcome or reduce the risk of recurrent heart attacks or strokes. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Diabetes, Heart Disease / 14.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Alex Dregan Lecturer in Translational Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Primary Care and Public Health Research King's College London, London Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Dregan: Our study showed that chronic inflammation was associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, specifically type II diabetes and coronary heart disease. The risk of cardiovascular disease increased with the severity of inflammatory disorders. In addition, inflammation also increased the risk of multiple morbidity (two or more cardiovascular diseases). (more…)
Author Interviews, Cost of Health Care, General Medicine, Heart Disease / 10.07.2014

Jeff Trost, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins MedicineMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jeff Trost, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins Medicine Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Trost: In our study, we reported the use of two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges. Specifically, we
  • 1) Provided information and education to physicians about proven testing guidelines and
  • 2) Made changes to the computerized provider order entry system at the medical center, part of the Johns Hopkins Health System. The guidelines call for more limited use of blood tests for so-called cardiac biomarkers. A year after implementation, our intervention led to an estimated $1.25 million reduction in laboratory charges.
(more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Global Health, Heart Disease / 10.07.2014

Anthony Bavry, MD MPH Interventional Cardiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32610MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Anthony Bavry, MD MPH Interventional Cardiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32610 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Bavry: 1) Among post-menopausal women, the regular use of NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. 2) Cardiovascular risk was observed among users of celecoxib, naproxen, but not ibuprofen. (more…)
Author Interviews, BMJ, Heart Disease / 09.07.2014

Philippe Pibarot, DVM, PhD, FAHA, FACC, FESC, FASE Professeur titulaire, Département de Médecine, Université Laval Professor, Department of Medicine, Laval University Directeur,  Chaire de Recherche du Canada sur les Maladies Valvulaires Cardiaques Chair,  Canada Research Chair in Valvular Heart Diseases Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de QuébecQuébec Heart & Lung Institute - Local Y4165MedicalResearch.com Interview with : Philippe Pibarot, DVM, PhD, FAHA, FACC, FESC, FASE Professeur titulaire, Département de Médecine, Université Laval Professor, Department of Medicine, Laval University Directeur,  Chaire de Recherche du Canada sur les Maladies Valvulaires Cardiaques Chair,  Canada Research Chair in Valvular Heart Diseases Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de QuébecQuébec Heart & Lung Institute - Local Y4165 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Pibarot: The optimal timing of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains a matter of debates. Both the American and European guidelines recommend AVR for patients with severe AS who present with symptoms or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. However, patients with aortic stenosis are often older, less physically active and have more comorbidities, which make the assessment of AS-related symptoms challenging and unreliable. In this study by Capoulade et al, plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were obtained in 157 patients with severe asymptomatic aortic stenosis and preserved LV ejection fraction at peak of exercise-stress echocardiography. Patients in the upper (>95 pg/ml) and mid (>45 pg/ml) tertiles of exercise BNP respectively had a 5- and 3- fold increase in the risk of events (i.e. AVR or death) compared to those in the lower tertile. Similar results were obtained in the subset of patients with low resting BNP. (more…)
Author Interviews, BMJ, Heart Disease / 07.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Mohanraj K Karunanithi Research Team Leader | Integrated Mobile Health Systems The Australian e-Health Research Centre Digital Productivity and Services Flagship CSIRO Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Karunanithi:
  • 33% more clients completed the innovative home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) delivery using smartphone and the internet (Care Assessment Platform CR program) compared with the traditional centre-based cardiac rehabilitation program.
  • Care Assessment Platform-CR  was as effective as tradition CR program in improving physical activity, diet intake, and lowering depression
  • Care Assessment Platform -CR was also effective in reducing weight, and anxiety levels and more importantly, the overall health related quality of life.
(more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Exercise - Fitness, Heart Disease / 07.07.2014

Peter Kokkinos PhD Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cardiology Division Washington, DC 20422MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Peter Kokkinos PhD Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cardiology Division Washington, DC 20422 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Kokkinos: The main finding of the study is that we defined an exercise capacity threshold for each age category (<50; 50-59; 60-69; and ≥70 years of age). The mortality risk increases progressively below this threshold and decreases above it. We then calculated the 5 and 10-year mortality risk for each age category. (more…)
Author Interviews, BMJ, Heart Disease / 04.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Patrícia Lourenço Serviço de Medicina Interna, Centro Hospitalar São João Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Unidade I&D Cardiovascular do Porto Monteiro, Portugal; Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Lourenço: A low prealbumin at hospital discharge associates with morbidity and mortality in acute heart failure patients. The prognostic value of low prealbumin in heart failure is independent of other nutritional markers and of the inflammatory status. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 03.07.2014

Sripal Bangalore, MD, MHA Director of Research, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Director, Cardiovascular Outcomes Group, Associate Professor of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sripal Bangalore, MD, MHA Director of Research, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Director, Cardiovascular Outcomes Group, Associate Professor of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Bangalore: We found that while CABG was associated with mortality benefit when compared with bare metal stents or first generation drug eluting stent, the gap between CABG and PCI was smaller and non significant when PCI was with newer generation DES. The same was true for repeat revascularization with the magnitude of benefit with CABG descending considerable from comparison with balloon angioplasty to newer generation DES. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Pharmacology, Testosterone / 03.07.2014

Jacques Baillargeon, PhD Director, Epidemiology Division Associate Professor Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health University of Texas Medical Branch MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jacques Baillargeon, PhD Director, Epidemiology Division Associate Professor Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health University of Texas Medical Branch MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Baillargeon: The main findings of the study were that older men who were treated with testosterone did not appear to have an increased risk of Myocardial Infarction.  For men with high MI risk, testosterone use appeared to be modestly protective against MI. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, NEJM, Stroke / 01.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Tommaso Sanna MD Institute of Cardiology Catholic University of the Sacred Heart Rome, Italy MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Sanna: In patients with cryptogenic stroke, continuous ECG monitoring with an implantable device, called the Reveal XT Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM), discovered Atrial Fibrillation in 6.4 times more patients than conventional diagnostic strategies at six months, 7.3 times more patients at 12 months, and 8.8 times more patients at 36 months. In more detail, after 36 months of follow-up, 30% of patients with cryptogenic stroke had at least one episode of atrial fibrillation. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 30.06.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Eddie Hulten, MD MPH FACC FSCCT Eddie Hulten, MD MPH FACC FSCCT and Ron Blankstein, MD FACCRon Blankstein, MD FACC Cardiovascular Imaging Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Brigham and Women’s Hospital Bethesda, MD Boston, MA MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer:  Although any medical test should be used to change management, the extent to which CCTA (Cardiac computed tomography angiography) findings are associated with medication changes (aspirin and lipid lowering) is not previously extensively studied. Thus, we conducted the largest and one of the longest follow up studies of preventive cardiovascular medications before and after coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).  We demonstrated that CCTA findings are associated with significant changes in preventive medications after CCTA. (more…)
Author Interviews, Gender Differences, Heart Disease, JAMA / 25.06.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: David Strauss, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Author Medical Officer Center for Devices and Radiological Health U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Md MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Strauss: The underrepresentation of women in clinical trials for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, as with other devices, has made it difficult to assess differences in the safety and effectiveness of these devices for women vs. men. The FDA is exploring the potential of pooling and analyzing data from multiple trials to bridge the knowledge gap for certain subpopulations (such as women) often underrepresented in medical device clinical trials. By conducting one such meta-analysis, the FDA found that women benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) significantly more than men do. (more…)