New Method of Intubation Offers Better Chance of Surviving Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Henry E. Wang, MD, MS Professor and Vice Chair for Research University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston  Department of Emergency Medicine Houston, Texas 

Dr. Wang

Henry E. Wang, MD, MS
Professor and Vice Chair for Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Department of Emergency Medicine
Houston, Texas

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: For over three decades, paramedics have performed endotracheal intubation (ETI) as the standard advanced airway management strategy in cardiac arrest. However, intubation is a difficult and error-prone intervention. Newer supraglottic airways such as the laryngeal tube (LT) offer easier insertion technique with comparable ventilation. However, intubation and laryngeal tubes have not been tested head-to-head in a randomized trial.

Our study – the Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART) – tested intubation vs laryngeal tube for airway management in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. The trial included 27 EMS agencies from the Birmingham, Dallas-Fort Worth, Milwaukee, Portland and Pittsburgh communities. The trial randomized a total of 3,004 adult cardiac arrests to airway management with ETI or LT.

We found that compared with traditional ETI, LT was associated with almost 3% better survival. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival in the US is less than 10%, so the observed difference is important.  Continue reading

Does Routine Oxygen After Heart Attack Reduce Risk of Dying?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robin Hofmann, MD PhD  Senior consultant cardiologist and researcher Department of clinical science and education Södersjukhuset, at Karolinska Institute

Dr. Hofmann

Robin Hofmann, MD PhD
Senior consultant cardiologist and researcher
Department of clinical science and education
Södersjukhuset, at Karolinska Institute

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Oxygen has been used to treat patients suffering a heart attack for more than a century, despite the fact that such treatment has not had any scientifically proven effect on patients who have normal oxygen levels in their blood. Since the turn of the millennium, researchers worldwide have started to question whether oxygen therapy for heart attacks is ineffective – or may even be harmful.

Continue reading

Clinical Chemistry Score Helps Rule Out Diagnosis of Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Peter Kavsak, PhD, FCACB, FAACC, FCCS Professor, Pathology and Molecular Medicine McMaster University 

Prof.. Kavsak

Peter Kavsak, PhD, FCACB, FAACC, FCCS
Professor, Pathology and Molecular Medicine
McMaster University 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: For patients who present to the hospital with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) the preferred blood test to help physicians in making a diagnosis is cardiac troponin.

Recent studies have demonstrated that a very low or undetectable cardiac troponin level when measured with the newest generation of blood tests (i.e., the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin tests) in this population may rule-out myocardial infarction (MI or a heart attack) on the initial blood sample collected in the emergency department, thus enabling a faster decision and foregoing the need for subsequent serial measurements of cardiac troponin over several hours as recommended by the guidelines. The problem with this approach, however, is that using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin alone to do this has not reliably been demonstrated to achieve a sensitivity >99% for detecting MI, which is the estimate that most physicians in this setting consider as safe for discharge.

Our study goal was to compare the diagnostic performance of a simple laboratory algorithm using common blood tests (i.e., a clinical chemistry score (CCS) consisting of glucose, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and either high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I or T) to high-sensitivity cardiac troponin alone for predicting MI or death within the first month following the initial blood work. Continue reading

Fewer Re-infarctions With hs Troponin To Assess Heart Attacks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Martin J Holzmann MD, PhD

Dr. Holzmann

Martin J Holzmann MD, PhD
Functional Area of Emergency Medicine
Department of Internal Medicine,
Solna, Karolinska Institutet
Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We wanted to investigate how the introduction of the new high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assay affected incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) use of coronary angiography, cardiac revascularizations, and prognosis in patients with myocardial infarction.

We found that the incidence of MI increased by approximately 5%, with no change in mortality, but with an 11% reduced risk of reinfarctions, and a small increase in coronary angiographies, and cardiac revascularizations by 16%, and 13%, respectively.  Continue reading

Amyloid Biomarker Predictive of Mortality in Non-STEMI Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Prof. Dr. med. Konstantinos Stellos,MD, FAHA, FESC Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Genetic Medicine Newcastle upon Tyne United Kingdom

Prof. Stellos

Prof. Dr. med. Konstantinos Stellos,MD, FAHA, FESC
Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Genetic Medicine
Newcastle upon Tyne
United Kingdom

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

 

Response: Risk stratification of patients with a non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) remains a major challenge in clinical cardiology. Risk stratification is important to identify patients at high risk, to whom an early coronary intervention with optimal adjunctive medical therapy shall be applied to reduce that risk. Conversely, it is equally important to identify patients at low risk, to whom a potentially hazardous invasive therapy or a multi-drug administration shall be avoided. Current ACC/AHA and ESC guidelines agree in a standardized approach that uses Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score, a well validated scoring system, to calculate a patient’s risk and guide triage and management decisions.

Amyloid-β (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42 peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42), are proteolytic fragments of a larger protein, the amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaved by β- and γ-secretases, found in typical brain amyloid deposits in Alzheimer’s disease. Many lines of evidence support a role of Aβ40 in cardiovascular disease as a peptide with pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic properties. Most cardiovascular risk factors seem to affect APP metabolism and thus, Aβ production and its soluble circulating APP770 isoform are elevated in patients with ACS_ENREF_15, suggesting a role for Aβ40 in the triggering and outcome of ACS in stable CAD patients. Although vascular inflammation is considered as a hallmark in the pathophysiologic pathways of coronary artery disease (CAD) and novel mechanisms are continuously recognized in its pathogenesis, no inflammatory marker is currently recommended for risk stratification of patients with NSTE-ACS individually or as a component of the GRACE score. This may partly explain the moderate discriminative ability of GRACE score in some studies, especially in older patients and those after early percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

In this retrospective study, we used data from two independent prospective cohorts, the Heidelberg study (n=1,145) and the validation multicenter international APACE (Advantageous Predictors of Acute Coronary Syndrome Evaluation, n=734) study and determined the clinical prognostic and reclassification value of baseline circulating Aβ40 levels in the prediction of mortality over the GRACE risk score in patients with NSTE-ACS across a median follow-up of 21.9 ( Heidelberg cohort) and 24.9 months (APACE cohort), respectively.

Continue reading

Silent MI Before Acute Heart Attack Can Be Poor Prognostic Indicator

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robin Nijveldt  MD PhD FESC Radboudumc Department of Cardiology The Netherlands

Dr. Nijveldt

Robin Nijveldt  MD PhD FESC
Radboudumc, Department of Cardiology and
VU University Medical Center
Department of cardiology
the Netherlands

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We know from previous studies that patients with unrecognized myocardial infarcts have worse prognosis than people without infarcts.

It was currently unknown in how many patients presenting with a first acute myocardial infarction had previous unrecognized MI, and if so, if this is still a prognostic marker on long term follow-up.

In this paper we studied 405 patients from 2 academic hospitals in the Netherlands, with an average follow-up duration of 6.8 years. We found that silent MI was present in 8.2% of patients presenting with first acute MI, and that silent MI is a strong and independent predictor for adverse long-term clinical outcome such as death (HR 3.69) or the composite end point of death, reinfarction, ischemic stroke, or CABG (HR 3.05). Additionally, it appears that ECG is of limited value to detect silent MI, since our study did not reveal an association with long-term clinical outcome.

Continue reading

More Heart Attacks In Younger Men Following Canadian Hockey Games

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Wings Hawks Game 2-11” by Michael Kumm is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Hung Q. Ly, M.D., S.M., FRCPC

President, Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology
Program Director, Adult Cardiology Postgraduate Training Program
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Interventional Cardiology Division,
Dept. of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Prior scientific reports have discussed the association between major sporting events and cardiovascular events, irrespective of the sport.

Ours is the first to report an increase in hospital admission rates for heart attacks in men younger than 55yo in the day following a hockey game.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response:  Emotional stress and lifestyle habits/behavioural patterns surrounding the spectatorship of hockey (i.e. drinking, unhealthy eating patterns, etc.) might make some Hockey (sports) fans more susceptible to heart attacks. We report a statistically significant increase in the incidence of heart attacks in young men watching the sport. This was an association that we manage to document but not an actual causal relationship. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response:  (1) Ascertain causality: Document that the “watching/attending a hockey game” was indeed an activity that the patient presenting with a heart attack did indeed do; (2) randomize sports fan to lifestyle changes and/or stress management strategies to explore if there is a decrease in cardiovascular events around the time of a sporting event. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

Response:  (1) I am a hardcore, diehard (no pun intended) Montreal Canadiens fan, which motivated me to perform this analysis; (2) We accounted for the effect of harsh winter conditions as a potential confounder of the increase in hospital rate admission for heart attacks; (3) we were quite surprised that victory, instead of defeat, lead to an increase in events; (4)  I have to conflict of interest to declare.

Citations:

Caroline E. Gebhard, Catherine Gebhard, Foued Maafi, Marie-Jeanne Bertrand, Barbara E. Stähli, Karin Wildi, Zurine Galvan, Aurel Toma, Zheng W. Zhang, David Smith, Hung Q. Ly. Hockey Games and the Incidence of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction. Canadian Journal of Cardiology, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/j.cjca.2017.12.028

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

Chewing Loading-Dose of Ticagrelor Enhanced Platelet Inhibition in Heart Attack Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Elad Asher, M.D, M.H.A Interventional Cardiologist, Director Intensive Cardiac Care Unit Deputy Director Heart Institute Assuta Ashdod Medical Cent

Dr. Asher

Elad Asher, M.D, M.H.A
Interventional Cardiologist,
Director Intensive Cardiac Care Unit
Deputy Director Heart Institute
Assuta Ashdod Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Dual antiplatelet therapy represents the standard care for treating ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Given the higher risk of peri-procedural thrombotic events in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), there is a need to achieve inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) more promptly. Although chewing ticagrelor has been shown to be more efficient for IPA in stable coronary disease and in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS)/non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSETMI), there are no studies that have specifically assessed the efficacy and safety of chewing ticagrelor in STEMI patients. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate whether chewing ticagrelor (180mg) loading dose is associated with more favorable platelet inhibitory effects compared with the conventional way of swallowing whole tablets loading dose in STEMI patients undergoing PPCI.

Continue reading

Does Pre-Hospital Advanced Life Support Improve Survival in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Alexis Cournoyer MD
Université de Montréal
Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal
Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal,
Montréal, Québec, Canada. 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Out-of-hospital advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) is frequently provided to patients suffering from cardiac arrest.  This was shown to improve rates of return of spontaneous circulation, but there was no good evidence that it improved any patient-oriented outcomes.  Given the progress of post-resuscitation care, it was important to reassess if ACLS improved survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.  Also, with the advent of extracorporeal resuscitation, a promising technique that needs to be performed relatively early in the course of the resuscitation and which seems to improve patients’ outcome, we wanted to evaluate if prolonged prehospital resuscitation with ACLS was effective in extracorporeal resuscitation candidates.

In this study, we observed, as was noted in previous study, that prehospital advanced cardiac life support  did not provide a benefit to patients regarding survival to discharge, but increased the rate of prehospital return of spontaneous circulation.  It also prolonged the delay before hospital arrival of around 15 minutes.  In the patients eligible for extracorporeal resuscitation, we observed the same findings.

Continue reading

Trying Statins Again After Adverse Effect Linked To Lower Risk of Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alexander Turchin, MD,MS Director of Quality in Diabetes Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, MA

Dr. Turchin

Alexander TurchinMD,MS
Director of Quality in Diabetes
Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Boston, MA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Cardiovascular disease is the # 1 cause of death in the U.S. and worldwide. Statins are some of the most effective medications available for prevention of cardiovascular events.

However, many patients stop statins, frequently because of adverse reactions. In our study we aimed to assess the risk-benefit balance of trying a statin again after experiencing an adverse reaction.

Continue reading

AEDs Delivered By Drones May Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“drones” by Andrew Turner is licensed under CC BY 2.0Andreas Claesson, RN, Paramedic

PhD Centre for resuscitation science
Karolinska institute
Stockholm, Sweden.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is low, the technology is existing. When implementing this kind of system with a drone equipped with an AED, defibrillation may occur at an early stage and before EMS arrival mainly in rural areas.

Continue reading

Elevated Kidney Biomarker Creatinine Predicts Worse Outcome in STEMI Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mohamed Khayata, MD Internal Medicine Resident PGY-3 Cleveland Clinic Akron General, Akron, Ohio MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Previous studies showed that patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had elevated creatinine and/or impaired creatinine clearance on presentation had higher short- and long-term mortality independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. We used the National Cardiovascular Database Registry to investigate the impact of creatinine levels at the time of presentation on the cardiovascular outcomes in patients who presented with STEMI. Our study showed that elevated creatinine levels correlated with higher incidence of atrial fibrillation, bleeding, heart failure, and cardiogenic shock during hospital stay after the percutaneous intervention. MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? Response: Creatinine level is being checked in almost all patients who present with STEMI within few hours of presentation. Based on previous reports and our results, creatinine is a critical marker that correlate not only with mortality, but is also with morbidity during hospital stay. This marker should be used as a predictor of worse outcomes; thus, patients with higher creatinine levels should be provided higher attention. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Response: Based on our study limitations, I would encourage performing similar outcomes analysis in larger group, multi-center registries. I would also suggest extending outcomes to post-discharge status including quality of life besides cardiovascular compilcations. MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add? Response: MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community. Citation: Abstract presented at the 2017 National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meeting https://www.kidney.org/spring-clinical The Impact of Admission Serum Creatinine on Major Adverse Clinical Events in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions. More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Dr. Khayata

Mohamed Khayata, MD
Internal Medicine Resident PGY-3
Cleveland Clinic Akron General
Akron, Ohio

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Previous studies showed that patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had elevated creatinine and/or impaired creatinine clearance on presentation had higher short- and long-term mortality independent of other cardiovascular risk factors.

We used the National Cardiovascular Database Registry to investigate the impact of creatinine levels at the time of presentation on the cardiovascular outcomes in patients who presented with STEMI.

Our study showed that elevated creatinine levels correlated with higher incidence of atrial fibrillation, bleeding, heart failure, and cardiogenic shock during hospital stay after the percutaneous intervention.

Continue reading

ST-Segment Elevation and Cardiac MRI in MI With Non-Obstructive Coronary Arteries

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Harmony Reynolds, MD Cardiologist and the Saul J. Farber Associate Professor of Medicine NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Reynolds

Harmony Reynolds, MD
Cardiologist
Saul J. Farber Associate Professor of Medicine
NYU Langone Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Some patients with heart attack have open, rather than severely narrowed, coronary arteries when they have a heart attack. This type of heart attack, known as myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries or MINOCA, can be caused by a number of different problems. Cardiac MRI is useful because it can help physicians to find the underlying cause of MINOCA.

MINOCA patients with ST elevation on the ECG are at higher risk of death than those without ST elevation but it is not known whether ST elevation correlates with any specific underlying cause of MINOCA.

Continue reading

Ischemic Postconditioning During Primary PCI for Patients With STEMI Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Thomas Engstrøm Senior Consultant dr. sci., MD, PhD The Heart Center | Rigshospitalet | University of Copenhagen | Denmark Professor in cardiology | University of Lund | Sweden Adjunct professor in cardiology | University of Aalborg | Denmark

Dr. Engstrøm

Thomas Engstrøm  MD, PhD
The Heart Center | Rigshospitalet | University of Copenhagen | Denmark
Professor in cardiology | University of Lund | Sweden
Adjunct professor in cardiology | University of Aalborg | Denmark 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Timely reperfusion by primary angioplasty (primary PCI) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction is mandatory. However reperfusion it self can harm the myocardium – so called reperfusion injury. During a number of years ischemic postconditioning (iPOST) by repetitive interruptions of blood flow after reperfusion has been a promising technique to address reperfusion damage.

The trial investigated the effect of iPOST in 1200 patients treated with primary PCI and in addition either iPOST or conventional angioplasty.

Continue reading

Young Smokers Have Drastic Increase in Heart Attack Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Kevin Campbell MD FACC Wake Heart and Vascular Assistant Professor of Medicine,  UNC School of Medicine Cardiology and Cardiac Electrophysiology in Raleigh, Smithfield and Wilson North Carolina.

Dr. Kevin Campbell

Dr. Kevin Campbell MD FACC
Wake Heart and Vascular
Assistant Professor of Medicine,  UNC School of Medicine
Cardiology and Cardiac Electrophysiology in Raleigh, Smithfield and Wilson
North Carolina 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In this study, data was analyzed from nearly 1800 patients who had ST elevation MI.  Findings were published in Heart.  They found that younger  smokers (age under the age of 50)  had an 8-fold increased risk of acute STEMI , when compared to ex- and never smokers.

In addition, researchers found that current smokers of all ages were 3.26 times more likely to have STEMI than ex- and never-smokers—suggesting that if you stop smoking, you can reduce your risk for heart attack.

Continue reading

Is Denial Helpful or Harmful in Coping With Heart Attack?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Xiaoyan Fang and
Sophia Hoschar

Institute of Epidemiology II
Mental Health Research Unit
Helmholtz Zentrum München
German Research Center for Environmental Health
Neuherberg

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Time to treatment is a crucial determinant of survival in patients who have suffered an acute myocardial infarction. During an acute myocardial infarction, patients often use denial as a coping mechanism which may provide positive mood regulating effects but may also prolong prehospital delay time (PHD). Indeed, some small exploratory studies, mainly performed over 10 years ago, provided a preliminary evidence that denial contributes to decreased adherence to effective cardiac treatment by disavowing of the diagnosis and by minimizing the perceived symptom burden and symptom severity. Thus, the object of Munich Examination of Delay in Patients Experiencing Acute Myocardial Infarction (MEDEA) study is to find the effect of denial on patients’ prehospital delay.

Our study contributes important new findings to the role of denial in the face of an AMI in an extended data set of STEMI patients.

  • First, the psychological coping mechanism of denial in the face of an AMI turned out to have more beneficial than adverse effects: denial contributed to less suffering from heart-related symptoms and negative potentially traumatizing affectivity without leading the patients to maladaptive behavior (e.g. waiting for the symptoms to resolve).
  • In addition, from an overall perspective, denial only minimally increased the delay time, whereas in the time window of 3-24hrs, denial led to a clinical significant longer delay. Apparently denial did not function in the most favorable time window presumably because of an extreme painful symptom pattern which overcame the effect of denial on prehospital delay. In this case, denial might be an intervention point for those who are without severe symptoms.

Continue reading

Both Men and Women Can Face Financial Barriers After Heart Attack

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Adam L. Beckman
Yale College, New Haven, CT (at the time this work was completed)
Erica S Spatz MD MHS
Assistant Professor, Section of Cardiovascular Medicine
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation
Yale-New Haven Hospital
Yale University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Beckman: Despite the expansion of insurance coverage, young adults face major challenges to obtaining affordable healthcare. We suspected women may experience greater challenges than men — they often have lower income and less complete medical coverage than men, and care for multiple generations of family, and that this may in part explain why young women have worse outcomes following a heart attack as compared with similarly-aged men.

Continue reading

Marijuana Use and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lori A. Walker, PhD University of Colorado Dept. of Medicine/Cardiology, Aurora, CO 80045

Dr. Lori Walker

Lori A. Walker, PhD
University of Colorado
Dept. of Medicine/Cardiology,
Aurora, CO 80045

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Walker: Marijuana use is increasing worldwide, in part due to local changes in legal status. Concomitantly, there has been an increase in case studies reporting adverse cardiac events associated with marijuana use. However, little is known about the impact of marijuana use on cardiovascular outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify outcomes in a retrospective analysis of hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with reported marijuana use at the time of admission. Administrative hospital records for 8 states between 1994-2013 were screened for adults (age > 18 years) with a diagnosis of AMI. Clinical profiles and outcomes in patients with reported marijuana use were compared to patients with no reported marijuana use. The primary outcome was a composite of death, mechanical ventilation, cardiac arrest, intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) placement, or shock. Secondary outcomes were components of the primary outcome plus coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Dr. Walker: Associations between marijuana, patient characteristics, and outcomes were determined using step-forward multivariate logistic regression which revealed that marijuana using patients were more likely to be younger, African-American and to use tobacco, cocaine/methamphetamine or alcohol than the control group. Accounting for age, race, and other risk factors such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, tobacco, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus, multivariate logistic regression suggested that marijuana-using patients were less likely to die in-hospital (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.68-1.00) post AMI but more likely to require mechanical ventilation (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.33).

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Walker: Clinicians and patients should be aware that there are likely direct effects of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system. This preliminary study underscores the need for further basic science research.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Walker: There is a strong need for basic science research aimed at elucidating the signaling pathways evoked by cannabinoids in both cardiac and vascular smooth muscle. Additionally, prospective clinical research aimed at quantifying the effects of marijuana use on cardiac rhythm in healthy patients and those with existing cardiac disease is essential.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Abstract presented at April 2016 ACC

Marijuana Use and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial Infarction Cecelia P. Johnson-Sasso, David Kao, Lori A. Walker, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
Cecelia P. Johnson-Sasso; David Kao; Lori A. Walker

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016;67(13_S):569-569. doi:10.1016/S0735-1097(16)30570-8

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Lori A. Walker, PhD (2016). Marijuana Use and Short-Term Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial MedicalResearch.com

Heart Attack Patients With Shock Particularly Vulnerable First 60 Days After Discharge

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rashmee U. Shah, MD MS Cardiovascular Medicine University of Utah School of Medicine

Dr. Rashmee Shah

Rashmee U. Shah, MD MS
Cardiovascular Medicine
University of Utah School of Medicine

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Shah: The purpose of this study was to evaluate long term outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) survivors who have cardiogenic shock. We used the ACTION Registry-GWTG (from the NCDR), which is the largest database of AMI, or heart attack, patients in the United States. Some heart attack patients develop cardiogenic shock which is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes so weak that it cannot effectively pump blood to the rest of the body. These patients are critically ill, but with advances in our treatment for heart attacks, many will survive to hospital discharge. We wanted to know, after all the intense treatment and sometimes long hospitalization, how do these patients fare when they leave the hospital? From a total of 112,668 heart attack patients who survived hospitalization, we identified 5,555 who had cardiogenic shock. Over half of all patients were either hospitalized or died within one year of discharge, and this poor outcome was more common among patients who had cardiogenic shock. In fact, the risk of death or hospitalization seems to be clustered in the early post-discharge time period, within 60 days, for patients with cardiogenic shock. After 60 days, shock and non-shock patients experience similar risk. In other words, we found that heart attack patients who had cardiogenic shock are particularly vulnerable during the first 60 days after hospital discharge.

Continue reading

Women Have Persistent Cardiovascular Risk After MI or Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Bob Siegerink PhD
Frits R. Rosendaal MD, PhD
Department of Clinical Epidemiology
Leiden University Medical Center
Leiden, the Netherlands

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The rates of death due to arterial thrombosis have been declining in the past years, which means that there are more patients with a high burden of disease. Arterial thrombosis is a uncommon disease in the young, but the burden of the disease might have a profound impact on their lives. We analyzed data form the RATIO study, in which we followed women with a ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction for up to 20 years. During this time, overall mortality was 2-4 times higher compared to the general population. This increase in risk was mainly driven by deaths from acute vascular events and persisted over the whole course of the follow up.

Continue reading

Divorce Raises Risk of Heart Attack, Especially For Women

Matthew E. Dupre, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine Department of Community and Family Medicine Department of Sociology Duke Clinical Research InstituteMedicalResearch.com Interview with: 
Matthew E. Dupre, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Department of Community and Family Medicine
Department of Sociology
Duke Clinical Research Institute

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Dupre: The negative health consequences of divorce have been known for some time.  However, we showed that lifetime exposure to divorce can have a lasting impact on ones’ cardiovascular health, particularly in women.  Results from our study showed that risks for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were significantly higher in women who had one divorce, two or more divorces, and among the remarried compared with continuously married women after adjusting for multiple risk factors.  Risks for AMI were elevated only in men with a history of two or more divorces relative to continuously married men. We were especially surprised to find that women who remarried had risks for AMI that were nearly equivalent to that of divorced women.  Men who remarried had no significant risk for acute myocardial infarction.

The results of this study provide strong evidence that cumulative exposure to divorce increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction in older adults.  Also somewhat unexpected was that the associations remained largely unchanged after accounting for a variety socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioral, and physiological factors.  However, we lacked information on several factors that we suspect may have contributed to the risks related to divorce – such as elevated stress, anxiety, and the loss of social support; as well as possible changes is medication adherence or other prophylactic behaviors.

MedicalResearch: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Continue reading

Heart Attack Carries Worse Prognosis In Dialysis Patients

Hemodialysis

Hemodialysis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tanush Gupta, MD

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
New York Medical College, NY

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Gupta: There are approximately 600,000 prevalent cases of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. Moreover, approximately 20% of these deaths due to cardiovascular disease are attributable to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Multiple studies have shown that ESRD patients have poor short- and long-term survival after AMI relative to the general population. We analyzed the publicly available Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases from 2003 to 2011 to examine the temporal trends in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), use of mechanical revascularization for STEMI, and in-hospital outcomes in adult ESRD patients in the United States.

We found that from 2003 to 2011, whereas the number of acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations in ESRD patients increased from 13,322 to 20,552, there was a decline in the number of STEMI hospitalizations from 3,169 to 2,558. The use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for STEMI increased from 18.6% to 37.8%, whereas there was no significant change in the use of coronary artery bypass grafting. During the study period, in-hospital mortality in ESRD patients with STEMI increased from 22.3% to 25.3%. We also observed an increase in average hospital charges and a decrease in mean length of stay during the study period.

Continue reading

Tai Chi Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Improved Functional Capacity After Heart Attack

Ricardo Stein, MD, ScD Exercise Cardiology Research Group, Cardiology Division Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, BrazilMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ricardo Stein, MD, ScD

Exercise Cardiology Research Group, Cardiology Division
Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre,
Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Stein: Patients with a recent myocardial infarction (MI) present a reduction in functional capacity expressed as a decrease in peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak). The impact of a Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) cardiac rehabilitation program for patients recovering from recent MI has yet to be assessed. Our goal was to evaluate functional capacity after a TCC-based cardiac rehabilitation program in patients with recent non complicated MI.

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings?

Dr. Stein:  After the 12-week study period, participants in the Tai Chi Chuan group experienced a significant 14% increase in VOpeak from baseline (21.6 ± 5.2 to 24.6 ± 5.2 mL.Kg-1.min-1), whereas control participants had a non-significant 5% decline in VOpeak (20.4 ± 5.1 to 19.4 ± 4.4 mL.Kg-1.min-1). There was a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.0001).

As a primary outcome, CPET results for the TCC and control groups at baseline and after the 12-week intervention period leading to a significant difference in peak VO2 (5.2 mL.Kg-1.min-1; 95% CI, 2.8 to 7.7, in favor to TCC group). This difference remained significant after adjustment to baseline measurements, age, gender, diabetes, and smoking (4.1 mL.Kg-1.min-1; 95% CI, 2.6 to 5.6, in favor to TCC group).

Summarizing:

–       We observed a significant increase in VO2 peak in TCC group participants.

–       Our results provide important information data from a randomized clinical trial of Tai Chi Chuan in patients with a history of recent MI.

–       Tai Chi Chuan can be an attractive alternative to cardiac rehabilitation for patients who don’t have access to conventional cardiac rehabilitation programs.

Continue reading

‘Leadership Saves Lives’ Program Aims To Reduce Heart Attack Mortality

Dr. Leslie CurryMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Leslie Curry PhD, MPH
Senior Research Scientist in and Lecturer in Public Health (Health Policy)
Co-Director, Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program
Yale School of Public Health

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Curry: Quality of care for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has improved substantially in recent years due to important investments by clinicians and policymakers; however, survival rates across U.S. Hospitals still differ greatly. Evidence suggests links between hospital organizational culture and hospital performance in care of patients with AMI. Yet few studies have attempted to shift organizational culture in order to improve performance, fewer have focused on patient outcomes, and none have addressed mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction.  We sought to address this gap through a novel longitudinal intervention study, Leadership Saves Lives (LSL). We have a large team of people with backgrounds in nursing, medicine, health care administration and research working in 10 very diverse hospitals across the country in 10 states. All hospitals are members of the Mayo Clinic Care Network and are fully committed to saving lives of patients with heart attacks. Teams of 10-12 clinicians and administrators are devoting substantial energy, expertise and good will to this project.

Continue reading

NSAIDS After Heart Attack Increase Risk of Bleeding and Further Heart Attacks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen, MD, PhD Department of Cardiology Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen DenmarkAnne-Marie Schjerning Olsen, MD, PhD
Department of Cardiology
Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen
Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Olsen: The question addressed in the study was: Do people who have had a myocardial infarction (heart attack) and are who taking drugs (known as antithrombotics) to reduce their risk of further heart attacks have an increased risk of serious bleeding, especially gastrointestinal bleeding, and of further heart attacks if they also take painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)?

We found that taking NSAIDs, even for periods of under one week (3-4 days for bleeding), was associated with increased risks of both bleeding and of further heart attacks.

Background: People who have suffered a heart attack are prescribed medicines afterwards to reduce their risk of another one. The medicines usually include two ’antithrombotic drugs’ which make platelets in the blood less sticky – the two most commonly used drugs are aspirin and clopidogrel. A side effect of antithrombotic treatment is that the drugs increase bleeding risk.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat pain and inflammation. They are very effective and are among the most widely used drugs in the world. Some NSAIDs can be bought across the counter without a prescription, for example, ibuprofen. NSAIDs have side effects too. All of them increase the risk of bleeding, especially gastro-intestinal bleeding arising from damage (ulcers) caused to the gut lining. Some NSAIDs, for example diclofenac, are also associated with a small increase in the risk of heart attack – this risk matters most for people already at risk of a heart attack. The medical advice is for these patients to avoid NSAIDs and for their doctors to avoid prescribing them if possible.

But pain is a common problem and very distressing for people – so in practice, NSAIDs are used quite often by patients who have had a heart attack. If NSAIDs are to be taken by heart attack patients, then it is important that both they and their doctors know the risks so that they can weigh up the benefits and downsides and make an informed decision.

What this study did: This was a cohort study that included everyone in Denmark aged 30 years or older who had had a first heart attack and who was taking antithrombotic medicines. Using hospital and dispensing registries, we examined patients who had suffered serious bleeding (causing admission to hospital and/or death) or who had another heart attack or cardiac event to see if they had been prescribed NSAIDs or not.

Dr. Olsen: The study findings: In this study of over 60,000 patients in Denmark taking antithrombotic medicines, one third of them had at least one prescription for NSAIDs, commonly ibuprofen or diclofenac, dispensed over a median study time of 3.5 years. In the same period, 8.5% (5,288 patients or 1 in 12 of the study group) had a gastrointestinal bleed (of whom 799 or 15% died) and 30% (18,568; 1 in 3) had a new cardiac event, mostly heart attack. While these events happened to patients who were prescribed NSAIDs and also to patients were not prescribed NSAIDs, we found that the risk of bleeding was doubled when patients were taking NSAIDs compared with not taking them. The risk occurred within 3 days of starting a NSAID. The risk of a cardiac event (mainly heart attack) was increased by 40% when taking NSAIDs compared with not taking them and also occurred within days of starting a NSAID.

In other words, the NSAIDs appeared 1) to increase the bleeding risk already existing with antithrombotics and 2) to diminish the cardiac protection that antithrombotics provided.

Limitations: This is just one study, although it is a big one. It was a ’real-life’ observational study not a randomised controlled clinical trial. More studies are needed to confirm what we have found.

MedicalResearch:  Why is this important information for patients and doctors to know?

Dr. Olsen: NSAIDs were used a lot by the patients in this study – pain is a common problem and can cause great suffering. There has been a tendency to think that short-term use of NSAIDs is safe – our study suggests this in not the case and that even a few days of use is associated with increased risks of both bleeding and cardiac events, mainly heart attacks. People may be happy to take these risks to have relief from pain but it is very important that they aware of the risks and can make an informed decision about taking NSAIDs for pain relief.

Citation:

Schjerning Olsen A, Gislason GH, McGettigan P, et al. Association of NSAID Use With Risk of Bleeding and Cardiovascular Events in Patients Receiving Antithrombotic Therapy After Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2015;313(8):805-814. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.0809.

Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen, MD, PhD Department of Cardiology (2015). NSAIDS After Heart Attack Increase Risk of Bleeding and Further Heart Attacks