Author Interviews, Dermatology, J&J-Janssen, Pharmaceutical Companies, Rheumatology / 13.11.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_38226" align="alignleft" width="96"]Atul A. Deodhar, MD, MRCP, FACP, FACR Professor of Medicine Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases Medical Director, Rheumatology Clinics Medical Director, Immunology Infusion Center Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU)  Dr. Deodhar[/caption] Atul A. Deodhar, MD, MRCP, FACP, FACR Professor of Medicine Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases Medical Director, Rheumatology Clinics Medical Director, Immunology Infusion Center Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU)  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The Phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo–controlled, multicenter trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of guselkumab (Tremfya®) compared with placebo in adults with active psoriatic arthritis, despite having received treatment with standard-of-care therapies, including anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha agents. In an observed analysis presented at ACR 2017, more than 70 percent of patients receiving guselkumab achieved at least a 20 percent improvement in signs and symptoms of disease (ACR 20) at week 56.  Findings also showed that improvements in tender and swollen joints, skin clearance, pain and physical function, and patient-reported quality of life outcomes reported at week 24, were maintained through week 56 in patients receiving guselkumab maintenance therapy (subcutaneous injections every eight weeks). 
Author Interviews, Orthopedics, Rheumatology, Social Issues / 07.11.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_38064" align="alignleft" width="140"]Susan M. Goodman, MD Director of the Integrative Rheumatology and Orthopedics Center of Excellence Hospital for Special Surgery Dr. Goodman[/caption] Susan M. Goodman, MD Director of the Integrative Rheumatology and Orthopedics Center of Excellence Hospital for Special Surgery  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: We have previously reported that African Americans who have poorer health outcomes, may be disproportionately impacted by community factors. For African Americans undergoing knee replacement, no difference in pain and function was seen compared to whites in communities with little poverty, while in poor communities, African Americans had poorer outcomes. We wondered if this was generally true or if this only applied to knee replacements. We found similar results; African Americans in richer neighborhoods have comparable outcomes to whites, but as poverty increases- in this study measured as percent with Medicaid coverage- outcomes worsen in a step wise fashion.
Author Interviews, BMJ, Pain Research, Rheumatology / 16.08.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_36483" align="alignleft" width="133"]Jos Runhaar, PhD Erasmus MC Department of General Practice Rotterdam The Netherlands Dr. Runhaar[/caption] Jos Runhaar, PhD Erasmus MC Department of General Practice Rotterdam The Netherlands MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Most international guidelines report an overall lack of efficacy of glucosamine for osteoarthrits. We however know that it is a very heterogeneous disease. Therefore, it is possible that there are certain subgroups of osteoarthritis patients that actually might have effect from glucosamine; for instance subgroups based on different pathologies underlying the clinical presentation, different co-morbidities, or different disease stages. For investigating efficacy in subgroups large sample sizes are needed, and certain methodological techniques are necessary, to get a valid and robust answer. Several years ago, a group of renowned international osteoarthritis researchers started the OA Trial Bank especially for investigating these subgroup effects of osteoarthritis treatments and collect individual patient data of worldwide-performed intervention studies in osteoarthritis patients. When using the individual patient data of multiple studies, it brings us the large sample size and allows us to use the right methods. We do these subgroup analyses in the OA Trial Bank for many different interventions, not just for glucosamine. The subgroup analyses for glucosamine and for corticosteroid injections are published, the others are ongoing (for instance exercise, orthoses and topicals) or planned and still waiting for funding. The study did show, however, that glucosamine can be extremely beneficial for pets, and specifically dogs who have joint related issues. Knowing the most valuable sources of glucosamine for dogs is important, as it can be extracted and gained from multiple sources, and each have their own varied levels of quality and potency.
Author Interviews, Lancet, Rheumatology, UT Southwestern / 20.06.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_35455" align="alignleft" width="150"]Roy Fleischmann, MD MACR Medical Director Metroplex Clinical Research Center Clinical Professor of Medicine University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75231 Dr. Fleischmann[/caption] Roy Fleischmann, MD MACR Medical Director Metroplex Clinical Research Center Clinical Professor of Medicine University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75231 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: In the phase 3 studies of tofacitinib, it was noted that the clinical responses to tofacitinib monotherapy were higher than the responses to tofaciotinib plus MTX and that tofacitinib plus methotrexate had numerically higher clinical responses compared to adalimumab plus methotrexate. This study was a non-inferiority design which compared tofacitinib monotherapy to tofacitinib + MTX and to adalimumab +MTX and tofacitinib monotherapy to tofacitinib +MTX in MTX incomplete responders. It was found that tofacitinib + MTX is non-inferior to adalimumab + MTX (and vice versa) and neither was superior to the other. The results of tofacitinib to either combination was non-conclusive showing neither non-inferiority or inferiority, but suggesting that either combination will be effective in more patients in a group of patients.
Author Interviews, Pain Research, Rheumatology, Sleep Disorders / 20.06.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_35448" align="alignleft" width="96"]Atul A. Deodhar, MD, MRCP, FACP, FACR Professor of Medicine Medical Director, Rheumatology Clinics Medical Director, Immunology Infusion Center Oregon Health & Science University  Dr. Deodhar[/caption] Atul A. Deodhar, MD, MRCP, FACP, FACR Professor of Medicine Medical Director, Rheumatology Clinics Medical Director, Immunology Infusion Center Oregon Health & Science University  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The GO-ALIVE study (CNTO148AKS3001) is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of golimumab, an anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody, administered intravenously (IV), in adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The primary objective is to evaluate the efficacy of golimumab 2 mg/kg in patients with active AS by assessing the reduction in signs and symptoms of AS. The secondary objectives include assessing efficacy related to improving physical function, range of motion, health-related quality of life, and other health outcomes. A total of 208 patients who had a diagnosis of definite  ankylosing spondylitis (per modified New York criteria) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) ≥4, total back pain visual analogue scale (VAS) ≥4, and CRP ≥0.3 mg/dL were randomized.  Patients were treated with IV golimumab (n=105) at Weeks 0, 4, and every 8 weeks through Week 52 or placebo (n=103) at Weeks 0, 4, and 12, with crossover to IV golimumab at Week 16 and through Week 52.
Author Interviews, CDC, Rheumatology / 13.05.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_34533" align="alignleft" width="157"]Jin Qin, ScD, MS Epidemiologist Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chamblee, GA 30341 Dr. Jin Qin[/caption] Jin Qin, ScD, MS Epidemiologist Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chamblee, GA 30341  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The hand is one of the sites most commonly affected by osteoarthritis (OA) but is often understudied compared with knee and hip OA. Many people with hand OA have significant symptoms, impaired hand strength and function, and disability in activities of daily living, like using a smart phone or a computer keyboard, and opening a jar. Lifetime risk is the probability of developing a condition over the course of a lifetime. In this study, we estimated that 40% of adults will develop symptomatic hand OA in their lifetimes. Nearly one in two women (47%) and one in four men (25%) will develop the condition. Whites have a 41% lifetime risk, compared with 29% for blacks. The lifetime risk among individuals with obesity is 47%, which is 11 percentage points higher than those without obesity.
Author Interviews, Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Merck, Rheumatology / 07.05.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_34434" align="alignleft" width="120"]Grace H. Lo MD MSc Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Medical Care Line and Research Care Line, Houston VA HSR&D Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety Michael E. DeBakey Medical Center, Houston, TX Dr. Grace H. Lo[/caption] Grace H. Lo MD MSc Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Medical Care Line and Research Care Line, Houston VA HSR&D Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety Michael E. DeBakey Medical Center, Houston, TX MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Many people who have signs of osteoarthritis on x-rays do not necessarily complain of pain. Presently, there are no known strategies for preventing the development of pain in this group of people. This study suggests that if these people have noisy knees (otherwise known as “crepitus”), they are at higher risk for developing pain within the next year compared to the people who do not have noisy knees. Future studies that target people who have x-ray signs of osteoarthritis, who do not complain of pain, but do report noisy knees, hold the promise of identifying interventions that can prevent knee pain.
Author Interviews, Rheumatology, Weight Research / 27.03.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_33428" align="alignleft" width="150"]Elizabeth Badley PhD Professor Emeritus Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto Director: The Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit and Head, Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research Krembil Research Institute Toronto Western Hospital Toronto, Ontario Dr. Elizabeth Badley[/caption] Elizabeth Badley PhD Professor Emeritus Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto Director: The Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit and Head, Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research Krembil Research Institute Toronto Western Hospital Toronto, Ontario  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The aging of the baby boomer population is focusing attention on the health experience of this sector of the population.  Arthritis is one of the most frequent chronic health problems in the population.  Our research question was to investigate whether the prevalence of arthritis differs between generations (also called birth cohorts) and what might be associated with any differences. Using data collected in a longitudinal Canadian population health survey between 1994 and 2011, we looked at 4 generations: the World War II generation born 1935-1944, older baby boomers born 1945-1954, younger baby boomers born 1955-64, and Generation X born 1965-1974.
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Rheumatology / 01.03.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_32535" align="alignleft" width="159"]Lihi Eder MD PhD Rheumatologist, Women’s College Hospital Scientist, Women’s College Research Institute Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto Toronto, ON, Canada Dr. Lihi Eder[/caption] Lihi Eder MD PhD Rheumatologist, Women’s College Hospital Scientist, Women’s College Research Institute Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto Toronto, ON, Canada MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: There significant delays in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among patients with psoriasis. Many patients with psoriasis experience musculoskeletal symptoms. The majority of them do not have PsA, but other non-inflammatory conditions such as fibromyalgia or osteoarthritis. In this study, we aimed to assess whether the presence and the degree of musculoskeletal symptoms in psoriasis patients predict the development of psoriatic arthritis. We analyzed a cohort of 410 psoriasis patients who were followed over a period of 9 years. These patients did not have arthritis at baseline. The patients were assessed annually by a rheumatologist for signs of PsA. A total of 57 patients developed psoriatic arthritis during the follow-up period.
Author Interviews, Exercise - Fitness, Gender Differences, Rheumatology / 14.02.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_32004" align="alignleft" width="156"]Adam Culvenor, PT, PhD Dr. Adam Culvenor[/caption] Adam Culvenor, PT, PhD Research Fellow,Institute of Anatomy Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversität Strubergasse Salzburg, Austria MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Thigh muscle weakness, particularly of the knee extensors (quadriceps), is a common feature of people with knee osteoarthritis. Thigh muscle weakness could be a consequence of knee osteoarthritis, or precede knee osteoarthritis development. There is conflicting evidence regarding the role of thigh muscle weakness as a risk factor for incident knee osteoarthritis in both men and women. Thigh muscle specific strength is a measure of muscle quality incorporating both the capacity of the muscle to produce force as well as muscle structure (ie. size, cross-sectional area), and preliminary data suggests this may be a more relevant measure of strength in relation to knee osteoarthritis development.
Author Interviews, Gastrointestinal Disease, Infections, Microbiome, Rheumatology, Science / 11.02.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_31926" align="alignleft" width="150"]Randy Longman, M.D. / Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Medicine Jill Roberts Center and Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Weill Cornell Medicine Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine Department of Microbiology and Immunology New York, NY 10021 Dr. Randy Longman[/caption] Randy Longman, M.D. / Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Medicine Jill Roberts Center and Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Weill Cornell Medicine Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine Department of Microbiology and Immunology New York, NY 10021  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Inflammatory bowel disease is not limited to intestinal inflammation.  Up to 1/3 of patients with active disease suffer from extra-intestinal manifestations. The most common extra-intestinal manifestations in IBD is joint inflammation or spondyloarthritis.  Peripheral joint spondyloarthritis  carries a prevalence of 20% in Crohn’s Disease and 10% in Ulcerative Colitis, predominantly affecting joints of the lower limbs.  It has long been suggested that gut bacteria can drive this systemic joint inflammation, but microbial targets have not been characterized.
Author Interviews, Exercise - Fitness, Rheumatology / 10.01.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_31138" align="alignleft" width="144"]Dorothy D. Dunlop Ph.D. Professor of Medicine and Preventive Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Institute for Public Health and Medicine Center for Healthcare Studies Chicago, IL 60611 Dr. Dorothy Dunlop[/caption] Dorothy D. Dunlop Ph.D. Professor of Medicine and Preventive Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Institute for Public Health and Medicine Center for Healthcare Studies Chicago, IL 60611  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  
  • We know is being active is good for health.
  • Good evidence supports the current federal guidelines of doing 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week to prevent serious conditions such as heart disease
  • But only 1 in 10 older US adults with arthritis in their lower limb joints (e.g., knees) meet federal physical activity guidelines
  • Inadequate physical activity is a major public health concern because It can lead to poor function, which threatens a person’s ability to live independently.
These issues motivated our study to investigate the minimum time commitment needed to improve function (or sustain high function) for adults with lower joint osteoarthritis.
Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, Dental Research, Infections, Rheumatology, Science / 17.12.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_30609" align="alignleft" width="200"]Maximilian F. Konig, MD Department of Medicine Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School Dr. Maximilian F. Konig[/caption] Maximilian F. Konig, MD Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Current affiliation: Department of Medicine Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response:The idea that rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disease that leads to chronic joint inflammation and destruction, may be initiated by a bacterial infection is not novel, but has been posited for more than a century. Based on the clinical observation that patients with RA frequently have severe periodontal disease (gum disease), gum inflammation has long been thought to contribute to disease development in RA. However, limited understanding of the mechanisms that fuel and sustain the autoimmune attack in RA made it difficult to pinpoint a specific bacterial trigger. In recent years, our understanding of the abnormal immune response that attacks the joints in patients with RA has grown exponentially, and we now know that disease-specific autoantibodies (ACPAs) target modified self-proteins (this modification is known as citrullination). It is this abnormal immune response against citrullinated proteins that appears to drive the joint (and sometimes lung) inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies from our laboratory at The Johns Hopkins University (led by principle investigator Felipe Andrade, MD, PhD) suggested that an immune cell called the neutrophil, which normally protects us from infection at sites like the oral cavity or anywhere else in the body, also appears to be the source of the proteins attacked in RA. We were therefore interested to understand what drives the association of gum disease, an inflammation commonly triggered by bacteria, with RA.
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Immunotherapy, Rheumatology / 28.11.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_30017" align="alignleft" width="96"]Atul Deodhar, M.D., M.R.C.P. Rheumatology Oregon Health and Science University Dr. Atul Deodhar[/caption] Atul Deodhar, M.D., M.R.C.P. Rheumatology Oregon Health and Science University  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are at an increased risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared with the general population. It is important that we assess whether new therapies, including the recently approved interleukin-17A (IL-17A) inhibitor, secukinumab, have an acceptable profile in terms of the risk of IBD in patients with psoriasis, PsA, or AS.
Author Interviews, Colon Cancer, Gout, NYU, Rheumatology / 20.11.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_29599" align="alignleft" width="150"]Michael Pillinger, MD Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology NYU School of Medicine Dr. Michael Pillinger[/caption] Michael Pillinger, MD Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology NYU School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: We are interested in the co-morbidities of gout and the fact that gout is accompanied by multiple cardiovascular, renal and other events. The implications of gout for cancer are less clear, but the basic biology suggests that either: 1) the acute and chronic inflammation of gout could contribute to a pro-cancer environment; 2) the anti-oxidant effects of urate could have anti-cancer properties; 3) the ability of uric acid to serve as a "danger signal" released from dying cells (potentially including cancer cells" could promote anti-cancer immunity. The clinical literature is murky at best.
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Immunotherapy, Pediatrics, Rheumatology / 16.11.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_29722" align="alignleft" width="170"]Timothy Beukelman, MD, MSCE Associate Professor of Pediatrics Division of Rheumatology and Division of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology University of Alabama at Birmingham Dr. Timothy Beukelman[/caption] Timothy Beukelman, MD, MSCE Associate Professor of Pediatrics Division of Rheumatology and Division of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology University of Alabama at Birmingham MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: In 2009 the US FDA issued a boxed warning about malignancies reported in children treated with TNF inhibitors but their analysis did not account for a possible malignancy risk from other medications of from the Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) disease process itself.
Author Interviews, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Rheumatology / 16.11.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof.dr. M.T. Nurmohamed, MD, PhD and Rabia Agca MD Dept. of Rheumatology | VU University Medical Center Amsterdam Rheumatology & immunology Center EULAR center of excellence in rheumatology MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: About 20 years ago the increased mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was well known, but not the causes. In daily clinical practice it seemed that RA patients more frequently suffered from myocardial infarctions than general population persons. Therefore, we started this study more than 15 years ago as at that time there were only sparse data with respect to cardiovascular morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.
Author Interviews, Rheumatology / 01.11.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_29310" align="alignleft" width="124"]Marie Hudson, MD MPH FRCPC Jewish General Hospital and Lady David Research Institute Montreal, QC Dr. Marie Hudson[/caption] Marie Hudson, MD MPH FRCPC Jewish General Hospital and Lady David Research Institute Montreal, QC MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Statins are widely used to treat hypercholesterolemia. In addition to their effect on cholesterol levels, statins also attenuate inflammation and have immunomodulatory properties. Whether this translates into meaningful differences in health outcomes, though, remains uncertain. We therefore undertook this study to determine whether people exposed to high doses of statins were at a lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis compared to those at lower doses. We studied a large population-based cohort of over half a million people exposed to statins for the first time and followed them on average for 3 years. We found that those exposed to the highest intensity statin quintile had a 33% lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis compared to those in the lowest intensity quintile (adjusted HR 0.77; 95% CI: 0.63-0.95). We conducted several additional secondary analyses that all pointed in the same direction and suggested that statins reduce the risk of rheumatoid arthritis.
Author Interviews, JAMA, Pharmacology, Rheumatology / 23.09.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jacques-Eric Gottenberg, MD, PhD Department of Rheumatology National Reference Center for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Strasbourg University Hospital, Université de Strasbourg Strasbourg, FranceJacques-Eric Gottenberg, MD, PhD Department of Rheumatology National Reference Center for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Strasbourg University Hospital, Université de Strasbourg Strasbourg, France MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: There is no recommendation for the choice of the second biologic in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and insufficient response to a first anti-TNF, which is a common situation in our daily practice (approximately one third of patients treated with anti-TNF). We therefore conducted the first randomized trial to date to investigate the best strategy in such a setting.
Author Interviews, Hematology, Rheumatology / 17.08.2016

MedicalResearch.com: Nisha Jain, Director Global Medical at Biogen Regarding: Post Hoc Analysis to Evaluate the Effect of Recombinant Factor IX Fc Fusion Protein (rFIXFc) Prophylaxis in Adults and Adolescents with Target Joints and Hemophilia B being presented at the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) 2016 World Congress MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: People with hemophilia B experience prolonged bleeding episodes that can cause pain, irreversible joint damage and life-threatening hemorrhages. For people with severe hemophilia, most bleeding events occur in joints, with joint damage being the most common complication of the condition.(1) Over time, joints can become severely damaged and an individual can suffer from acute pain as well as restricted range of motion in those joints.(1) MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings? Response: The B-LONG and B-YOND trials evaluated ALPROLIX® [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein] in hemophilia B patients. In this post-hoc analysis of 37 patients with target joints in B-LONG and B-YOND, most (98.9%) target joints were considered resolved using the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) definition of resolution as ≤ 2 bleeds into the joint within a consecutive 12-month period.
Author Interviews, Blood Pressure - Hypertension, Gout, Johns Hopkins, Nutrition, Rheumatology / 16.08.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_27021" align="alignleft" width="155"]Stephen P. Juraschek, MD, PhD Fellow, Division of General Internal Medicine Johns Hopkins Hospital Dr. Stephen Juraschek[/caption] Stephen P. Juraschek, MD, PhD Fellow, Division of General Internal Medicine Johns Hopkins Hospital MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Diet has long been viewed as an important way to lower uric acid levels to prevent gout attacks; however, there is little evidence about whether a particular dietary pattern might be effective for lowering uric acid. For the first time we show that the DASH diet, an effective diet for lowering blood pressure, it lowers uric acid levels substantially in people with abnormally high uric acid levels.
Author Interviews, Genetic Research, Microbiome, Rheumatology / 15.07.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_26144" align="alignleft" width="166"]Veena Taneja, Ph.D Immunologist Mayo Clinic Rochester MN Dr. Veena Taneja[/caption] Veena Taneja, Ph.D Immunologist Mayo Clinic Rochester MN MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Gut bacteria have been suggested to be involved in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. We used new technology to sequence the bacteria in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and first degree relatives and healthy individuals. We found that patients had lower diversity of bacteria than healthy individuals and the composition of the gut microbiota differed between patients and healthy people. We could identify some bacteria that have expanded in patients though those are generally observed with low numbers in healthy individuals. We could define certain metabolic signatures that associated with microbial profile. For the first time, we could show a direct link between the arthritis-associated bacteria we identified and enhancement of arthritis using a mice carrying the RA-susceptible HLA gene.
Author Interviews, BMJ, Immunotherapy, Johns Hopkins, Rheumatology / 27.06.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_25574" align="alignleft" width="146"]Laura C. Cappelli, M.D Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Dr. Laura Cappelli[/caption] Laura C. Cappelli, M.D Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: We had been referred several patients with inflammatory arthritis or dry mouth and dry eyes after being treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. When searching the literature for information on how to evaluate and treat these patients, we realized that there was minimal information available. We wanted to describe our experience and inform the medical community about these events so that recognition could increase.
Author Interviews, NEJM, Rheumatology / 02.06.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Chih-Hung Kuo, M.B., B.S. Peter McCluskey, M.D. Clare L. Fraser, M.B., B.S. University of Sydney Sydney, NSW, Australia MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Giant cell arteritis is a life and sight threatening systemic inflammatory condition, which remains difficult to diagnose. Jaw claudication (cramping of muscle from ischemia) is a highly specific symptom with significant diagnostic and prognostic (risk of permanent blindness) values. The reporting of jaw symptoms may be affected by many factors, such as diet. There remains no standardized clinical test available for clinicians. We study the use of chewing gum as a standardized test (like a stress test for angina pain) to better characterize this critical symptom. The pilot study of two cases with abnormal results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Chewing gum at a rate of 1 chew/second can reproduce the jaw claudication symptom around 2-3 minutes. In one case, the jaw claudication was unmasked by the test with a subsequent positive biopsy result. The test result became negative after corticosteroid treatment.
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, Rheumatology / 16.05.2016

MedicalResearch.comcom Interview with: Hui-Wen Lin MD, PHD Department of Mathematics, Soochow University Evidence-Based Medicine Center, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University Taipei, Taiwan MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Dr. Hui-Wen Lin: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disorder that affects multiple organ systems and it predominantly affects women aged 20 to 40 years, and clinical symptoms caused by autoantibody deposition that triggers subsequent inflammatory reactions vary between individuals. There were 30~80% of SLE patients present neurological symptoms, and it is referred to as neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE). However there is no research about risk of dementia for SLE patients. Therefore we investigated this issue by analyzing the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan.
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Heart Disease, Rheumatology / 04.05.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_24005" align="alignleft" width="196"]Lihi Eder, MD, PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto Scientist, Women’s College Research Institute,Room 6326 Women’s College Hospital Toronto, ON, Canada Dr. Lihi Eder[/caption] Lihi Eder, MD, PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine University of Toronto Scientist, Women’s College Research Institute,Room  6326 Women’s College Hospital Toronto, ON, Canada  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Dr. Eder: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated skin disease affecting 2-3% of the general population. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) affects 15-30% of patients with psoriasis. Until recently, only few studies assessed the risk of developing cardiovascular events in patients with PsA and while most studies found a higher cardiovascular risk in these patients, others reported cardiovascular rates that were similar to the general population.
Author Interviews, Hearing Loss, Rheumatology / 28.04.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_23868" align="alignleft" width="149"]Dr-Amir-Emamifar Dr. Emamifar[/caption] Dr. Amir Emamifar, MD Department of Rheumatology Odense university Hospital Svendborg Hospital, Denmark [caption id="attachment_23869" align="alignleft" width="139"]Associate Professor Inger Marie Jensen Hansen, PhD, DMsci Department of Rheumatology, Odense university Hospital, Svendborg Hospital, Denmark. University of Southern Denmark. Dr. Hansen[/caption]   Associate Professor Dr. Inger Marie Jensen Hansen, PhD, DMsci Department of Rheumatology Odense university Hospital Svendborg Hospital University of Southern Denmark   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the general population. Apart from main articular manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis may involve other organs including heart, lung, skin, and eye. The auditory system can be affected during the course of the disease as well; however the association between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. It seems that hearing impairment in rheumatoid arthritis is a multifactorial disease affecting by environmental factors and disease and patient characteristics. We did a comprehensive review of all published data to reveal the potential link between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing impairment.
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Rheumatology / 22.04.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_23716" align="alignleft" width="200"]Nicola Veronese, MD University of Padova Department of Medicine (DIMED)-Geriatrics Section Padova, Italy Dr. Nicola Veronese[/caption] Nicola Veronese, MD University of Padova Department of Medicine (DIMED)-Geriatrics Section Padova, Italy MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Veronese: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common rheumatic disease. Although an increasing research is showing that OA, particularly of lower limbs, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) the association with overall mortality seems to be less clear.
Author Interviews, JAMA, Rheumatology, Vitamin D / 10.03.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_22335" align="alignleft" width="195"]Changhai Ding, MBBS, MMED, MD Australian Research Council Future Fellow Associate Director (International), Menzies Institute for Medical Research Professor, University of Tasmania, Australia Honorary Professor, University of Sydney, Australia Dr. Changhai Ding[/caption] Changhai Ding, MBBS, MMED, MD Australian Research Council Future Fellow Associate Director (International), Menzies Institute for Medical Research Professor,  University of Tasmania, Australia Honorary Professor, University of Sydney, Australia MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Ding: Vitamin D can reduce bone turnover and cartilage degradation, thus potentially preventing the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Observational studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation is associated with benefits for knee osteoarthritis, but current evidence from clinical trials is contradictory. We  conducted a randomised clinical trial in Hobart, Tasmania and Melbourne, Victoria in Australia. We randomly assigned 413 patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D to receive monthly treatment with oral vitamin D3 (50,000 IU; n = 209) or an identical placebo (n = 204) for 2 years. Of 413 enrolled participants (average age, 63 years; 50 percent women), 340 (82 percent) completed the study. Vitamin D supplementation significantly increased blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels over 2 years compared with placebo treatment; however, vitamin D supplementation, compared with placebo, did not result in significant differences in change in MRI-measured tibial cartilage volume or a measure of knee pain over 2 years. There were also no significant differences in change of tibiofemoral cartilage defects or change in tibiofemoral bone marrow lesions. Post-hoc analyses indicated that vitamin D supplementation might improve knee physical function and reduce another measure of knee pain and increases in bone marrow lesion.
Author Interviews, OBGYNE, Rheumatology, Stanford / 03.02.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Julia Fridman Simard ScD Assistant Professor Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research & Policy Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Stanford School of MedicineDr. Julia Fridman Simard ScD Assistant Professor Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research & Policy Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Stanford School of Medicine  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Simard: A number of studies have shown that women with lupus who get pregnant have more complications and adverse outcomes, although the methodologies across studies vary considerably. Using population-based data we were able compare the occurrence of these pregnancy complications in mothers with lupus to pregnancies from the general population. We were also interested in whether women in our data set who first presented with lupus up to five years post-partum had more pregnancy-related adverse events. Our descriptive study showed that preterm delivery, infant infection, and preeclampsia were more common in the first singleton pregnancies of women with lupus compared to the general population.  These outcomes were also observed more often among women who appeared to present with lupus up to five years post-partum.