Pressure of Electronic Medical Record Documentation Contributing to Physician Burnout

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rebekah L Gardner MD Associate Professor of Medicine Warren Alpert Medical School Brown University Providence, Rhode Island

Dr. Gardner

Rebekah L Gardner MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Warren Alpert Medical School
Brown University
Providence, Rhode Island

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Burnout profoundly affects physicians, their patients, and the health care system.The role of technology in physician burnout, specifically health information technology (HIT), is not as well characterized as some of the other factors. We sought to understand how stress related to HIT use predicts burnout among physicians.

Our main findings are that 70% of electronic health record (EHR) users reported HIT-related stress, with the highest prevalence in primary care-oriented specialties. We found that experiencing HIT-related stress independently predicted burnout in these physicians, even accounting for other characteristics like age, gender, and practice type. In particular, those with time pressures for documentation or those doing excessive “work after work” on their EHR at home had approximately twice the odds of burnout compared to physicians without these challenges. We found that physicians in different specialties had different rates of stress and burnout.

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Physician Burnout Linked to Increased Patient Safety Risks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Maria Panagioti| Senior Research Fellow Division of Population Health, Health Services Research & Primary Care University of Manchester Manchester

Dr. Panagioti

Dr Maria Panagioti, Senior Research Fellow
Division of Population Health
Health Services Research & Primary Care
University of Manchester
Manchester

 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Several studies have shown that the demanding work environment has alarming consequences on the well-being of physicians. Over 50 percent of physicians experience significant signs of burnout across medical specialities. However, the consequences of burnout on patient care are less well-known.

This is the largest meta-analysis to date which pooled data from 43,000 doctors to examine the relationship between burnout in physicians and patient safety, professionalism and patient satisfaction.

We found that burnout in physicians is associated with two times increased risk for patient safety incidents, reduced professionalism and lower patient satisfaction. Particularly in residents and early career physicians, burnout was associated with almost 4 times increased risk for reduced professionalism.  Continue reading

Majority of Neurologists Report Symptoms of Burnout

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Neil A. Busis, M.D. University of Pittsburgh Physicians Department of Neurology Chief of Neurology, UPMC Shadyside Director of Community Neurology

Dr. Neil A. Busis

Neil A. Busis, M.D.
University of Pittsburgh Physicians
Department of Neurology
Chief of Neurology, UPMC Shadyside
Director of Community Neurology

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Previous studies showed that neurologists have both one of the highest rates of burnout and the lowest rates of satisfaction with work-life balance, compared to other physicians.

The mission of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is to promote the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care and enhance member career satisfaction. This is why AAN President Dr. Terrence Cascino initiated this research, to better define the issue. Our findings can guide current and future programs to prevent and mitigate neurologist burnout, promote neurologist career satisfaction and well-being, and direct efforts to advocate on behalf of neurologists and their patients.

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Relationship Between Physician Burnout and Quality of Care

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michelle P. Salyers Ph.D.</strong> Professor, Psychology Director, Clinical Psychology Program Director, ACT Center of Indiana Affiliated Scientist, Regenstrief Institute, Inc. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, IN

Dr. Salyers

Michelle P. Salyers Ph.D.
Professor, Psychology
Director, Clinical Psychology Program
Director, ACT Center of Indiana
Affiliated Scientist, Regenstrief Institute, Inc.
Indiana University-Purdue University
Indianapolis, IN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Professional burnout among healthcare providers is receiving more attention in research and in public press. There have long been speculations that the level of burnout may be related to quality of care provided, and many studies have been done linking provider burnout with different aspects of quality of care.

This study brings together that literature, to summarize and quantify the link between professional burnout in healthcare provider and the quality of care they provide. We were able to combine data from 82 independent samples, across health care disciplines, settings, and types of quality indicators. We found small to medium relationships between provider burnout and indicators of quality of care.

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What Interventions Can Reduce Epidemic Physician Burnout?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Colin P. West, MD, PhD, FACP  Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Biomedical Statistics and Informatics Departments of Internal Medicine and Health Sciences Research Mayo Clinic

Dr. Colin West

Colin P. West, MD, PhD, FACP
Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Biomedical Statistics and Informatics
Departments of Internal Medicine and Health Sciences Research
Mayo Clinic

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Physician burnout has reached epidemic levels, as documented in national studies of both physicians in training and practicing physicians demonstrating burnout rates in excess of 50%. Consequences include negative effects on patient care, professionalism, physicians’ own care and safety, and the viability of health-care systems. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to better understand the quality and outcomes of the literature on approaches to prevent and reduce burnout.

We identified 2617 articles, of which 15 randomized trials including 716 physicians and 37 cohort studies including 2914 physicians met inclusion criteria. Across interventions, overall burnout rates decreased from 54% to 44%, emotional exhaustion score decreased from 23.82 points to 21.17 points, and depersonalization score decreased from 9.05 to 8.41. High emotional exhaustion rates decreased from 38% to 24% and high depersonalization rates decreased from 38% to 34%.

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Physician Burnout Continues Unabated, With Clinicians Saying Facilities Aren’t Doing Enough to Address It

MedicalResearch.com interview with:

Diane Hayes, Ph.D., President and co-founder, InCrowd Areal time market intelligence service to the life sciences

Diane Hayes Ph.D.

Diane Hayes, Ph.D.,
President and co-founder, InCrowd
Areal time market intelligence service to the life sciences

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this survey?

Response: Physician burnout is a significant concern across the healthcare continuum, as Affordable Care Act (ACA) measures change the nature of doctoring, and as at least 30 major teaching hospitals at least 30 major teaching hospitals undertake initiatives aimed at reducing burnout ahead of its potential impact on patient safety and quality outcomes. Numerous studies have documented the issue.

We thought it would be instructive to use InCrowd’s mobile microsurvey platform for a mid-year snapshot of burnout sentiment. The microsurvey used the Maslach Burnout Inventory of symptoms to determine respondents who could be considered to be experiencing burnout—the same index as used by the widely cited Mayo Clinic and MedScape studies. We also asked if facilities are addressing the issue, a topic not always covered.

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12 Hour Shifts May Increase Nursing Burnout

Chiara Dall'Ora MSc Nursing and Midwifery Sciences University of SouthamptonMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Chiara Dall’Ora MSc
Nursing and Midwifery Sciences
University of Southampton 

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There is a trend for healthcare employers to adopt longer shifts, typically 2 shifts per day each lasting 12 hours. This allows nurses to work fewer shifts each week. Changes are driven by perceived efficiencies for the employer, and anecdotal reports of improved work life balance for employees because they work fewer days per week. However, it is unclear whether these longer shits adversely affect nurses’ wellbeing, in terms of burnout, job dissatisfaction, dissatisfaction with work schedule flexibility and intention to leave the job.

We found that when nurses work 12 h shifts or longer they are more likely to experience high burnout, dissatisfaction with work schedule flexibility and intention to leave their job, compared to nurses working 8 h or less. All shifts longer than 8 hours are associated with nurses’ job dissatisfaction.

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Perfectionism Leads To Faster Burnout

Andrew P. Hill, Ph.D, CPsychol, FBASES, FHEA Associate Professor and Head of Taught Postgraduate Programmes Faculty of Health and Life Sciences York St John University York UKMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Andrew P. Hill, Ph.D, CPsychol, FBASES, FHEA
Associate Professor and Head of Taught Postgraduate Programmes
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
York St John University
York UK

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Hill: Our research examines the effects of perfectionism in a wide range of contexts and for a number of outcomes. We are particularly interested in the perfectionism-burnout relationship. Perfectionism is a characteristic that is more common than you might think, everyone seems to know someone who is a perfectionist. Burnout is the result of stress and, anecdotally, people seem to be finding modern life more stressful.

The main finding was that perfectionistic concerns, a core feature of perfectionism that reflects doubts and fears relating to the consequences of failure, was positively related to burnout in the workplace, sport, and education. This relationship was stronger in the workplace.

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