Asthma: Add-on Maintenance Treatment with FASENRA (benralizumab) Can Reduce Exacerbations

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Tosh Butt, MBA VP Respiratory AstraZeneca

Tosh Butt

Tosh Butt, MBA
VP Respiratory
AstraZeneca

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? How is benralizumab different from more traditional treatments for asthma?

    • BORA is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, Phase III extension, and is one of six Phase III trials in the WINDWARD program in asthma. The current analysis includes results for 1,926 patients from the two placebo controlled exacerbation trials, SIROCCO (48 week) and CALIMA (56 weeks). BORA provides evidence that add on maintenance treatment with FASENRA (benralizumab) resulted in a consistent safety profile over a second year of treatment, with no increase in the frequencies of overall or serious adverse events, and sustained efficacy in terms of reducing asthma exacerbations, and improving lung function and asthma symptoms. The BORA trial results could provide confidence to patients with severe eosinophilic asthma and physicians that the positive outcomes they may be seeing with benralizumab can be maintained over a second year of treatment.
  • FASENRA, a different kind of respiratory biologic, has a strong clinical profile which includes the ability to show lung function improvement after the first dose, the potential to reduce – or even stop – oral steroid use, and the convenience of 8-week dosing (no other respiratory biologic offers this dosing). FASENRA is approved for add-on maintenance treatment of patients with severe asthma ages 12 years and older, and with an eosinophilic phenotype. FASENRA binds directly to the IL-5a receptor on an eosinophil and uniquely attracts natural killer cells to induce apoptosis, or cell death. Other biologics currently available are anti-IL5s – a passive approach that primarily acts to block differentiation and survival of the eosinophil.

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Asthma Linked to Increased Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Aivaras Cepelis, MSci Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim, Norway

Aivaras Cepelis

Aivaras Cepelis, MSci
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science
NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Trondheim, Norway

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained, irregular and often rapid heart rate with a lifetime risk of 26%. The number of adults with atrial fibrillation is projected to double by 2050. Atrial fibrillation is also linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes such as doubled risk of stroke and cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, we believe that research into the novel risk factors of the disease is highly warranted.

One of the potential condition that could play a role in the growing prevalence of atrial fibrillation is asthma. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease, affecting as many as 30 million children and adults in Europe. High levels of systemic inflammation biomarkers have been reported in both uncontrolled asthmatics and patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, beta-agonists, the most common prescribed asthma control medication, has been shown to influence heart rate and increase the risk of irregular heartbeat.

However, research looking at asthma and atrial fibrillation link are lacking and no previous studies have assessed the dose-response relationship between levels of asthma control and atrial fibrillation. We utilized over 54 000 adults from a large well-defined Norwegian population cohort The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) to explore this association.

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Two Studies Evaluate Monoclonal Antibody Tralokinumab For Asthma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Reynold A. Panettieri, Jr., M.D. Professor of Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Vice Chancellor, Clinical & Translational Science Director, Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine & Science Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Child Health Institute of New Jersey Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey New Brunswick, NJ  08901

Dr. Panettieri

Reynold A. Panettieri, Jr., M.D.
Professor of Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Vice Chancellor, Clinical & Translational Science
Director, Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine & Science
Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Child Health Institute of New Jersey
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ  08901

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Severe asthma is characterized by Type 2 inflammation manifested by increases in IL-13, IL-4 and Il-5 levels in the airways that promotes airway hyperresponsiveness and in part irreversible airway obstruction.  These clinical manifestations profoundly increase asthma morbidity and mortality.

To address an unmet therapeutic need, Tralokinumab was developed as a monoclonal antibody targeting soluble IL-13 with the goal of improving lung function and patient reported outcomes while decreasing annual exacerbation rates.  Stratus 1 and 2 represent two identical randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 clinical trials in severe asthma.  These international trials enrolled approximately 2000 subjects with severe asthma and examined whether Tralokinumab decreased annualized exacerbation rates (AER) as compared with placebo (primary outcome).

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New Test Can Identify Asthma With Nasal Brush Biomarker

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Supinda Bunyavanich MD

Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Physician and researcher at the Icahn School of Medicine.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: In this study, we report on an accurate asthma biomarker we have developed based on a simple nasal brush.

Nasal Brush-based Classifier of Asthma

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects 10% of children and adults in the U.S. Mild to moderate asthma can be difficult to diagnose because symptoms change over time and can be complicated by other respiratory conditions. Given the high prevalence of asthma, there is high potential impact of improved diagnostic tools on reducing morbidity and mortality from asthma.

Current diagnostic tools for asthma, including spirometry and bronchoscopy, require specialized equipment and expertise to operate properly. Many individuals, particularly young children, have difficulty with pulmonary function testing because it requires, coordinated, forced breaths into a device. Spirometry results are unreliable when done with poor technique. Bronchoscopy is not practical for mild to moderate symptoms. For these reasons, asthma is often diagnosed and managed based on self-reporting of symptoms  This can be unreliable, resulting in repeated doctor visits and even trips to the ER. Thus, a biomarker test for asthma that is easy to implement and interpret is highly desirable for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Continue reading

Study Confirms Dupilumab Reduces Asthma Exacerbations

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Mario Castro, M.D., M.P.H. Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Radiology Washington University School of Medicine 

Drr. Castro

Mario Castro, M.D., M.P.H.
Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine,
Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Radiology
Washington University School of Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: This is a confirmatory phase 3 pivotal study that assessed the efficacy and safety of dupilumab in a population of uncontrolled moderate to severe asthmatics.

This was the largest phase 3 placebo controlled trial conducted in this population evaluating a biologic. It enrolled patients without any minimum requirement for any type of biomarker such as blood eosinophils. It clearly confirmed the efficacy of dupilumab in reducing severe asthma exacerbations, improving lung function, asthma control and quality of life in the overall population. It also showed that patients with evidence of type 2 inflammation (increased blood eosinophils or exhaled NO) had a greater magnitude of effect.

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Quadrupling Inhaled Steroids May Abort Some Asthma Attacks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Asthma Inhaler” by NIAID is licensed under CC BY 2.0Timothy Harrison, MBBS, BSc, FRCP, MD, MSc
Professor and Honorary Consultant
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences
University of Nottingham

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Self management plans are recommend for patients with asthma but previous studies have shown that doubling the dose of inhaled steroids when asthma starts deteriorating is ineffective at preventing the development of an exacerbation.

This study shows that quadrupling the dose is effective and in a real-life setting can reduce severe exacerbations by about 20%

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Intestinal Microbiome Linked To Pediatric Asthma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Anita Kozyrskyj, PhD, Professor, Dept Pediatrics Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta Edmonton, AB 

Dr. Kozyrskyj

Anita Kozyrskyj, PhD, Professor, Dept Pediatrics
Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: I was motivated to study the maternal asthma-infant microbiome link by the well-established fact that maternal asthma affects infant birth weight in a sex-specific manner. Based on data from AllerGen’s CHILD birth cohort, Caucasian baby boys born to pregnant moms with asthma—putting them at the highest risk for developing asthma in early childhood—were one-third as likely to have high levels of the microbe, Lactobacillus, in their gut microbiome at 3-4 months after birth.

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Children With Eczema and Food Allergies At Increased Risk of Developing Asthma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Eczema” by NIAID is licensed under CC BY 2.0Malcolm R. Sears, MB ChB

Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health
St Joseph’s Healthcare and McMaster University
Ontario Canada. 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study was initiated in 2008, funded by AllerGen NCA and CIHR, to determine root causes of allergy and asthma.

We recruited 3623 pregnant mothers in 4 centers across Canada and are following 3495 eligible children from pregnancy to age 5 years.

In this paper we describe some of the findings in early childhood, namely that children who develop skin conditions generally called eczema or atopic dermatitis, who are also sensitized to food allergens (milk, egg, peanut) at 1 year are at high risk of developing subsequent asthma, whereas those with these skin conditions but not sensitized are not at such risk.

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No Link Found Inhaled Steroids and Bone Fractures in Asthmatic Children

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Asthma” by Michael Havens is licensed under CC BY 2.0Teresa To, PhD
Biostatistics, Design and Analysis
Scientific Director
The Hospital for Sick Children
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We studied asthma prescription drug use in Ontario children aged 2 to 18 years with physician diagnosed asthma between 2003 and 2014.

We found that:

  1. Currently in Ontario, nearly 50% of children with asthma did not fill a prescription for an inhaled corticosteroid during the study period, despite these medications being considered the gold-standard for asthma management.
  2. Our findings did not show clinically important association between inhaled corticosteroids and fracture among children with asthma.
  3. However, systemic corticosteroids (oral or injection) are associated with higher fracture risk in children with asthma (17% higher risk).

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Interactive Digital Tool Lungprint Aims To Help Asthma Sufferers Take Control Of Their Symptoms

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Frank Trudo, MD, MBA Brand Medical Lead US Respiratory AstraZeneca

Dr. Trudo

Frank Trudo, MD, MBA
Brand Medical Lead US Respiratory
AstraZeneca

MedicalResearch.com: Would you tell us about Lungprint?  How will Lungprint help asthma patients take better control of their disease?

Response: Lungprint is an interactive digital tool that creates a dynamic visual representation of a person’s lungs based on their unique experiences with asthma. It is meant to provide people with asthma a better understanding of the role of asthma in their life and motivate them to have a more personalized conversation with their healthcare provider about the severity of their symptoms, a more individualized treatment plan and a blood test that measures eosinophil levels.

Each person’s Lungprint, which is generated as they respond to a digital questionnaire about their experience with asthma, will help reveal information about their individual experience with asthma. You can visit www.lungprint.com to learn more about the tool and create your own Lungprint.  Continue reading

How Do Viruses Trigger Cough In Asthmatic Children, Even Without Allergies

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Giovanni Piedimonte, MD Steven and Nancy Calabrese Endowed Chair for Excellence in Pediatric Care, Research, and Education Professor & Chair of Pediatrics Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Piedimonte

Giovanni Piedimonte, MD
Steven and Nancy Calabrese Endowed Chair for Excellence in Pediatric Care, Research, and Education
Professor & Chair of Pediatrics
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study proves that asthmatic children already have a hyperactive calcium channel that’s extremely sensitive to environmental triggers.

If these children contract a virus, such as RSV, the hyperactive channel causes more severe symptoms that may require care in a hospital setting.

When a child developed asthma or bronchitis in the past, doctors thought these conditions could only be triggered by environmental allergens. There was no explanation why two out of three children ages five and under who wheeze and cough – and still test negative for allergies.

We needed to explore the mechanisms of the calcium molecule and the epithelial cells, which seem to trigger these symptoms without an allergic reaction. If the molecule’s behavior is producing the cough, we just need to figure out how to control the molecule to properly deactivate the cough mechanism in the asthmatic child

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Vitamin D May Have a Role In Reducing Risk of Severe Asthma Attacks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

David Jolliffe, PhD Centre for Primary Care and Public Health Blizard Institute Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry London

Dr. Jolliffe

David Jolliffe, PhD
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health
Blizard Institute
Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry
London

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and is estimated to cause almost 400,000 deaths annually. Asthma deaths arise primarily during episodes of acute worsening of symptoms, known as attacks or ‘exacerbations’, which are commonly triggered by viral upper respiratory infections. Vitamin D is thought to protect against such attacks by boosting immune responses to respiratory viruses and dampening down harmful airway inflammation.

Several clinical trials have tested whether vitamin D supplementation might protect against asthma attacks, but individually their results are inconclusive. In the current study, we pooled raw data from 955 asthma patients who took part in 7 separate trials, which allowed us to answer two questions:

1, Does vitamin D protects against asthma attacks overall, when data from all trials are pooled?

2, Do people who have lower vitamin D levels to start with particularly benefit from supplementation?

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Asthma Improvement Collaborative Reduced ER Visits and Hospitalizations in Medicaid Population

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Carolyn M. Kercsmar, MD Co-Director, Division of Pulmonary Medicine Director, Asthma Center Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine Cincinnati, Ohio

Dr. Kercsmar

Dr. Carolyn M. Kercsmar, MD
Co-Director, Division of Pulmonary Medicine
Director, Asthma Center
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine
Cincinnati, Ohio 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Asthma is the most common chronic condition of childhood and is responsible for substantial morbidity and health care costs, in large portion as a result of emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Moreover, children who live in poverty and are members of minority groups are disproportionately affected.

Our paper reports the results of a quality improvement project that spanned the inpatient, outpatient and community settings and resulted in significant reduction in emergency department visits and hospitalizations for asthma in urban children insured by Medicaid.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Broad based interventions that are based on the chronic care model and involve changes in health care systems across multiple setting and disciplines can improve asthma outcomes.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future work should focus on replicating these findings in other settings and with other personnel, such as community health workers as interventionalists and a formal economic evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of the program. 

Disclosures: This work was supported by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and in part by a grant from Health Information Technology Beacon Program to the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and grant 90BC00116/01 for development of web-based asthma registry and health care use alerts. 

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Kercsmar CM, Beck AF, Sauers-Ford H, Simmons J, Wiener B, Crosby L, Wade-Murphy S, Schoettker PJ, Chundi PK, Samaan Z, Mansour M. Association of an Asthma Improvement Collaborative With Health Care Utilization in Medicaid-Insured Pediatric Patients in an Urban Community. JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 18, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.2600

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

Pneumococcal Vaccine Rates Still Too Low Among Adults With Work-Related Asthma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Katelynn Dodd MPH Respiratory Health Division National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morgantown WV 26505

Katelynn Dodd

Katelynn Dodd MPH
Respiratory Health Division
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Morgantown WV 26505

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Adults with asthma are at increased risk for pneumococcal infection. Adults with asthma who get pneumococcal pneumonia are at risk for additional complications including asthma exacerbation and invasive pneumococcal disease. Our results indicated that adults with work-related asthma were more likely to have received a pneumococcal vaccine than adults with non-work-related asthma—54 percent compared to 35 percent respectively; however, pneumococcal vaccination coverage among all adults with asthma, work-related or not, who have ever been employed in this study falls short of achieving the coverage public health experts recommend. Among adults with work-related asthma, pneumococcal vaccine coverage was lowest among Hispanics (36 percent), those without health insurance (39 percent), and adults aged 18 to 44 years (42 percent).

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Asthma Outcomes Worse in Low Income Groups

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS Associate Professor of Pediatrics Harvard Medical School Director, Asthma Clinical Research Center Boston Children's Hospital Asthma, Allergy and Immunology Boston, MA 02115

Dr. Phipatanakul

Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Harvard Medical School
Director, Asthma Clinical Research Center
Boston Children’s Hospital
Asthma, Allergy and Immunology
Boston, MA 02115

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Observational studies have limitations in their ability to examine disparities in asthma, as these studies have relied on self-reported measures of medication use, asthma diagnosis, severity, outcomes, and access to care.

Using data collected from a randomized controlled trial, we found that subjects with lower income had a significantly higher number of asthma treatment failures and asthma exacerbations, independent of race, BMI, education, perceived stress, baseline lung function, hospitalizations, inhaled corticosteroid adherence, inhaled corticosteroid dose, environmental allergen sensitization, and second-hand smoke exposure.

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Vitamin D Supplements Will Probably Not Help Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Brent Richards, MD, MSc</strong> Associate Professor of Medicine William Dawson Scholar / FRQS Clinical Research Scholar Departments of Medicine, Human Genetics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics McGill University Senior Lecturer, King's College London (Honorary)

Dr. Brent Richards

Brent Richards, MD, MSc
Associate Professor of Medicine
William Dawson Scholar / FRQS Clinical Research Scholar
Departments of Medicine, Human Genetics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics McGill University
Senior Lecturer, King’s College London (Honorary)

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Some previous epidemiological studies have suggested that low vitamin D levels are associated with increased rates of asthma, atopic dermatitis—an itchy inflammation of the skin—and elevated levels of IgE, an immune molecule linked to atopic disease (allergies). In our study, we looked at genetic and health data on more than 100,000 individuals from previous large studies to determine whether genetic alterations that are associated with vitamin D levels predispose people to the aforementioned conditions.

We found no statistically significant difference between rates of asthma (including childhood-onset asthma), atopic dermatitis, or IgE levels in people with and without any of the four genetic changes associated with lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the form of vitamin D routinely measured in the blood.

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Nurse-Driven Clinical Pathway for Asthma Improves Efficiency, Reduces Length of Stay

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Catherine M. Pound MD The Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre

Dr. Catherine Pound

Catherine M. Pound MD
The Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood and contributes to a large portion of Canadian hospital pediatric admissions.  Once patients are admitted to hospitals, they receive salbutamol, a medication used for acute asthma exacerbations, at a pre-determined frequency.  In most hospitals, physicians are the ones to decide of the frequency of administration of the salbutamol, and they decide when to wean patients off it. However, children whose salbutamol treatment administration can be decreased are usually considered stable, and often do not require immediate medical attention, which may results in delays in reassessments as well as administration of unneeded salbutamol treatments, particularly if physicians are busy looking after other sicker patients.  Additionally, physicians’ assessments of children with asthma and their decisions to wean salbutamol frequency are not standardized, and vary among physicians. Therefore, in order to improve efficiency and standardize patient assessments, we developed a clinical pathway allowing nurses to wean salbutamol for children hospitalized with asthma based on a validated asthma scoring system.

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Mouse Allergens Drives Asthma Symptoms In Many Children

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Elizabeth C. Matsui, MD MHS Professor of Pediatrics, Epidemiology, and Environmental Health Sciences Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD 21287

Dr. Matsui

Elizabeth C. Matsui, MD MHS
Professor of Pediatrics, Epidemiology, and Environmental Health Sciences
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, MD 21287 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We designed this study after our previous work indicated that mouse allergy was common among low-income children living in some urban neighborhoods in the US, that these children also had high levels of mouse allergen exposure in their homes, and that children who are both allergic to mice and exposed to high levels of mouse allergen are at greater risk of asthma symptoms, emergency room visits and hospitalization.   Given this background, we designed a randomized clinical trial to determine if an intensive professionally delivered mouse intervention was better than education about mouse control in reducing asthma symptoms and lowering home mouse allergen levels.

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Sleep Duration and Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Asthma and Health Adults

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rauno Joks, MD

Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Chief, Division of Allergy & Immunology
Program Director, Allergy &Immunology Fellowship
SUNY Downstate Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There are circadian and circannular patterns to many diseases, including allergy and asthma. Humans spend roughly one-third of their lifetimes asleep. Your immune system never sleeps, but shifts its activity when you sleep.

It is known that asthma disease activity can be worse at night – the reasons for this are complex, and may involve changes in allergic responses.

We found, in a preliminary study of both adults with and without asthma, that longer duration of nighttime sleep was associated with lower levels of exhaled nitric oxide, a biomarker which is elevated in exhaled breath of those with allergic asthma. This may carry over into the afternoon as well, but the sample size was too small to fully conclude that.

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Pediatric Asthma Costs Over $5 Billion Per Year In Health Care Expenses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Patrick W. Sullivan, Ph.D. Professor Regis University School of Pharmacy Denver, CO 80221

Dr. Sullivan

Patrick W. Sullivan, Ph.D.
Professor
Regis University School of Pharmacy
Denver, CO 80221

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Asthma is one of the most common chronic disorders among children. It affects 7.1 million children in the U.S. Of these, 4.1 million children suffered an asthma attack in 2011. An asthma attack is an acute period of extreme difficulty breathing. It can be life threatening and is always very frightening for children. Because asthma can be dangerous and frightening, it ends up costing a lot because patients need to go the doctor, hospital or take medications to try to control it.

Asthma also has a negative effect on the patient’s health and outlook about their health – both mentally and physically. Previous studies have focused on adults with asthma and have found that it is very expensive – it costs $18 billion in the U.S. to manage adults with asthma. Those studies also showed that adults with asthma have lower quality of life. However, there is not a lot of good evidence on the burden of asthma in children. This study was designed to quantify the cost and mental and physical health of children with asthma in the U.S.

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Asthma Risk Varies Among Hispanic Groups After Relocation to the U.S.

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Elina Jerschow, M.D., M.Sc., FAAAAI, FACAAI Associate Professor of Medicine, Allergy/ Immunology Division Director, Drug Allergy Center Montefiore Medical Center The University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, New York 10461

Dr. Elina Jerschow

Elina Jerschow, M.D., M.Sc., FAAAAI, FACAAI
Associate Professor of Medicine, Allergy/ Immunology Division
Director, Drug Allergy Center
Montefiore Medical Center
The University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Bronx, New York 10461

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Asthma prevalence varies across and within countries, and markedly increased rates of asthma have been observed in recent decades. Recent time-trends may be attributed to increased urbanization and dissemination of a Western lifestyle.

In the US, asthma disproportionally affects African-Americans and Hispanics/Latinos living in urban areas. Among Hispanics/Latinos, asthma prevalence varies from 5.7 % for Mexicans/Mexican-Americans to 16.5% for Puerto Ricans. Besides national background, US nativity, longer duration of US residence, and having one or two parents born in the US have been previously reported as acculturation-related risk factors for asthma in foreign born children. Asthma prevalence was also higher in foreign-born Latinos who relocated to the US as children.

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Palivizumab Prophylaxis in Preterm Infants and Subsequent Recurrent Wheezing

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Hiroyuki Mochizuki, M.D., Ph.D
.
Professor & Chairman
Department of Pediatrics
Tokai University School of Medicine
Japan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: My major is allergy and respiratory health of children. By this examination, we wanted to know the true influence of respiratory syncytial virus infection on childhood atopic asthma. We have confirmed that infantile asthma is heterogenic, and at least two kinds of phenotypes are present.

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Fish Oil Fatty Acids in Pregnancy May Reduce Wheeze and Asthma in Offspring

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hans Bisgaard, M.D., D.M.Sc. COPSAC, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital University of Copenhagen Copenhagen, Denmark

Dr. Hans Bisgaard

Hans Bisgaard, M.D., D.M.Sc.
COPSAC, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital
University of Copenhagen
Copenhagen, Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Asthma and lower respiratory infections are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in pediatric populations. Thus, having low cost, effective, safe options for prevention could have important implications for both clinical practice and public health.

The increased use of vegetable oils in cooking and of grain in the feeding of livestock has resulted in an increase in the intake of n−6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and a decrease in the intake of n−3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially the long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) — eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n–3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n–3, DHA) — found in cold-water fish. N3-LCPUFAs are known to have immune-modulatory effects, and observational studies have suggested an association between a diet that is deficient in n−3 LCPUFA during pregnancy and an increased risk of asthma and wheezing disorders in offspring. Only a few randomized, controlled trials of n−3 LCPUFA supplementation during pregnancy have been performed and these have generally been underpowered and produced ambiguous results.

Therefore, we conducted a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of n−3 LCPUFA supplementation during the third trimester of pregnancy in a total of 736 Danish women to assess the effect on the risk of persistent wheeze and asthma in offspring.

The clinical follow-up rate among children was 96% (N=664) by the end of the 3 years double-blind period and 93% (N=647) after an additional follow-up to age 5 years.
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Trajectory To Childhood Asthma Begins At Birth

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Donata Vercelli, MD Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Arizona Director, Arizona Center for the Biology of Complex Diseases Associate Director, Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center The BIO5 Institute, Rm. 339 Tucson, AZ 85721

Dr. Donata Vercelli

Donata Vercelli, MD
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Director, Arizona Center for the Biology of Complex Diseases
Director, Molecular Genomics, Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center
The University of Arizona The BIO5 Institute
Tucson, AZ 85721

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Epidemiological evidence suggests that the disease often begins during the pre-school years even when chronic symptoms appear much later in life. However, firm criteria to pinpoint how early a child’s trajectory to asthma truly begins are currently lacking. The mechanisms underlying asthma inception also remain largely unknown. Although epigenetic mechanisms likely contribute to asthma pathogenesis, little is known about their role in asthma inception.

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Cured Meat Linked To Worsening of Asthma Symptoms

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Zhen LI, MD, MPH, PhD Candidate

INSERM UMR-S 1168 (ex-Equipe 5 du CESP)
(VIMA : Aging and chronic diseases. Epidemiological and public health approaches.), Hôpital Paul Brousse
France

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: -Cured meat, which is rich in nitrite, has been known as a probable carcinogen. However, although some studies have suggested a potential deleterious role of cured meat intake in lung health, its role in asthma remained unknown.

This study was conducted using data from the French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Using data from 971 participants with seven years’ follow-up, we found that participants who ate frequently cured meat, including ham, sausages, and dried sausages, had a high likelihood of having worsening asthma symptoms. The highest likelihood (76% more) was observed among participants who ate cured meats four or more servings per week, compared with those who ate less than one serving per week. Moreover, as previous studies suggested that obesity is linked to worsening asthma, we used a newly developed method to estimate if this effect was mediated by Body Mass Index (BMI), and we found that overweight/obesity only partly explained the association (14%).

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