Ibalizumab Immunotherapy Decreased Viral Load In Resistant HIV

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Brinda Emu MD Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases Yale University New Haven, CT

Dr. Brinda Emu

Brinda Emu MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases
Yale University
New Haven, CT 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Ibalizumab is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the CD4 receptor.  This Phase III registrational study enrolled individuals with HIV infection that harbor high levels of multi-drug resistance, with limited treatment options.  At IDWeek in October, 2016, data was presented that demonstrated patients experienced a significant decrease in viral load after receiving a single loading dose of ibalizumab 2,000 mg intravenously (IV) in addition to their failing antiretroviral therapies (ART) (or no therapy). Seven days after this loading dose, 83% of patients achieved a ≥ 0.5 log10 decrease from baseline compared with 3% during the seven-day control period .These results were statistically significant (p<0.0001).

At CROI, additional data on the Week 24 results from this study are now presented.

Continue reading

Allergic Rhinitis: Three Years of Immunotherapy Gives Longer Lasting Symptom Control

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Stephen R. Durham, MD

Imperial College, London, and Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals
NHS Foundation Trust
London, United Kingdom

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Allergic rhinitis affects 1 in 4 the UK population and may compromise sleep and work/school performance and be associated with bronchial asthma. When nasal steroids and antihistamines do not work or cause side effects, allergen immunotherapy is an alternative. Immunotherapy using high doses of grass pollen allergen as monthly injections or daily tablets under the tongue are highly effective. Treatment for 3 years not only gives sustained improvement on treatment but also long-term benefits and disease remission for at least 2-3 years after stopping treatment.

This single centre study at Imperial College London and Royal Brompton Hospital London included 106 adults with severe Hayfever followed up for 3 years, 2 years on treatment and 1 year after stopping treatment. In this double-blind trial, 3 randomised groups took sublingual immunotherapy, subcutaneous immunotherapy and placebo treatment. 92 completed the trial. Results showed that 2 years treatment with both modalities did not result in persistent benefit at year 3, although the researchers found that both treatments were effective compared to placebo during years 1 and 2.

Continue reading

Imatinib Revolutionizes Treatment of Unresectable/Metastatic GI Stromal Tumors

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael C. Heinrich, MD Professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology Oregon Health & Sciences University

Dr. Michael Heinrich

Michael C. Heinrich, MD
Professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology
Oregon Health & Sciences University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Prior to 2000, there were no effective medical treatments for advanced GI stromal tumor and patients faced an average life expectancy of 18 months or less.  In our study of the  long-term treatment results using imatinib (Gleevec),  we found that approximately 7% of patients were still on front-line therapy at 10 years without any evidence of tumor progression.  More importantly, the estimated 10 year survival was 23%.   Progression-free and overall survival rates were significantly higher for patients with KIT exon 11-mutant GIST when compared with patients with KIT exon 9-mutant or “wild-type” GIST (no KIT/PDGFRA mutations).

Continue reading

Vaccine Nanodiscs Can Trigger More Cancer Fighting Immune Cells

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

James Moon, PhD John Gideon Searle Assistant Professor University of Michigan Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering Biointerfaces Institute Ann Arbor, MI, 48109

Dr. James Moon

James Moon, PhD
John Gideon Searle Assistant Professor
University of Michigan
Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering
Biointerfaces Institute
Ann Arbor, MI, 48109

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The field of cancer immunotherapy has recently made a breakthrough with the clinical success of immune checkpoint inhibitors, which work by removing the brakes on immunosuppressed T-cells. However, these approaches generally work by augmenting pre-existing T-cell immunity and benefit only a subset of patients. In addition, because the majority of somatic mutations in cancer cells are unique to each patient, cancer immunotherapy may benefit from a personalized approach.

Continue reading

Vandetanib Had Antitumor Activity In RET-rearranged NSC Lung Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Kiyotaka Yoh

Department of Thoracic Oncology
National Cancer Center Hospital East
Kashiwa, Japan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: LURET is multicenter, single-arm, phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vandetanib as RET inhibitor in patients with advanced RET-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In 2012, RET rearrangements were identified as rare oncogenic alterations for NSCLC.

Among 17 eligible patients included in primary analysis, the objective response rate was 53% (95% CI 28–77), which met the primary endpoint. At the data cutoff, median progression-free survival was 4.7 months (95% CI 2.8–8.5). Overall, vandetanib was tolerated, with an adverse event profile similar to those seen in previous large population studies of vandetanib in patients with unselected NSCLC.

Continue reading

First-line ribociclib + letrozole in patients with de novo HR+, HER2- Advanced Breast Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Joyce O'Shaughnessy, MD Co-Chair, Breast Cancer Research Texas Oncology-Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center

Dr. Joyce O’Shaughnessy

Joyce O’Shaughnessy, MD
Co-Chair, Breast Cancer Research
Texas Oncology-Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The MONALEESA-2 trial is a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, international study of LEE011 in combination with letrozole vs. letrozole alone, in postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2- advanced breast cancer who had received no prior systemic therapy for advanced disease.

Because de novo disease has not been previously treated with systemic treatment for early-stage breast cancer, tumors may exhibit a different disease biology, which could result in varied responses compared to patients who experience recurrence of their initial breast cancer. We analyzed a pre-defined subgroup of women with de novo HR+/HER2- advanced breast cancer to better understand the response of LEE011 plus letrozole in this patient population.

In the de novo advanced breast cancer patient sub-group, progression free survival was significantly prolonged; LEE011 plus letrozole reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 55% over letrozole alone (HR=0.448 [95% CI: 0.267–0.750]). The 12-month PFS rate was 82% in the LEE011 plus letrozole arm compared to 66% with letrozole alone.

Most adverse events were mild to moderate in severity, identified early through routine monitoring, and generally managed through dose interruption and reduction. The most common all-grade adverse events (≥30% of patients with de novo advanced breast cancer) in the LEE011 plus letrozole arm were neutropenia (70.2%), nausea (48.2%), fatigue (42.1%), alopecia (39.5%), and leukopenia (31.6%).

Continue reading

Mesothelioma: Nintedanib Plus Chemotherapy Demonstrated Improved Progression-Free Survival

Professor Giorgio V. Scagliotti Chair of the Department of Oncology University of Torino,Italy

Prof. Scagliotti

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Professor Giorgio V. Scagliotti

Chair of the Department of Oncology
University of Torino,Italy


MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: LUME-Meso II is an international study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nintedanib plus pemetrexed/cisplatin, followed by nintedanib versus placebo plus pemetrexed/cisplatin, followed by placebo, for the treatment of patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

MPM is a rare cancer that affects the cells that make up the mesothelium of the pleura – the lining or membrane that covers and protects the lungs. It represents less than 1% of all cancers and is often related to long-term asbestos exposure.

A significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), the study’s primary endpoint, was observed for patients receiving nintedanib plus chemotherapy compared to patients receiving placebo plus chemotherapy.

Continue reading

Breast Cancer: PARP Inhibitor Veliparib Has Potential To Enhance Platinum Chemotherapy in Recurrent or Metastatic Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Vince Giranda, M.D., PH.D.
Project Director
AbbVie Oncology Development

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In this Phase 2 study, called BROCADE 2, veliparib combined with the platinum chemotherapy regimen carboplatin and paclitaxel showed positive trends in overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), although these were not statistically significant. Importantly there were no meaningful increase in side effects with the addition of veliparib to carboplatin and paclitaxel. The veliparib combination regimen also demonstrated a significantly higher objective response rate.

Continue reading

No Increased Risk of IBD Among Secukinumab-Treated Patients with Moderate to Severe Psoriasis in Phase 2 & 3 Clinical Studies

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Atul Deodhar, M.D., M.R.C.P. Rheumatology Oregon Health and Science University

Dr. Atul Deodhar

Atul Deodhar, M.D., M.R.C.P.
Rheumatology
Oregon Health and Science University 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are at an increased risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared with the general population. It is important that we assess whether new therapies, including the recently approved interleukin-17A (IL-17A) inhibitor, secukinumab, have an acceptable profile in terms of the risk of IBD in patients with psoriasis, PsA, or AS.

Continue reading

Multiple Sclerosis: Interim Report on the Safety and Efficacy of Long-Term Daclizumab Treatment for Up to Five Years

MedicalResearch.com Interview with
Ralph Kern, M.D.
Senior vice president, Worldwide Medical
Biogen

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Previously reported clinical trials of daclizumab demonstrated significant efficacy across clinical and MRI measures, compared to placebo and interferon beta-1a 30 mcg intramuscular (IM) injection, and established the therapy’s safety profile for up to two to three years. These trials were the basis for approval by health authorities in the United States, European Union and Australia. Daclizumab is a once-monthly, self-administered, subcutaneous therapy for relapsing forms of MS (RMS).

At ECTRIMS we presented the first interim results from EXTEND, a long-term extension study. EXTEND is an ongoing multicenter, open-label study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of daclizumab treatment in more than 1,500 patients with RMS.

This interim ECTRIMS analysis includes up to five years of data from patients who were previously enrolled in DECIDE. DECIDE was a Phase 3 study evaluating the effects of daclizumab relative to interferon beta-1a IM. In the new analysis, patients who were treated with interferon beta-1a IM for two to three years in DECIDE switched to daclizumab when they enrolled in EXTEND, and were compared to daclizumab patients treated continuously in both DECIDE and EXTEND.

Continue reading

Activation of the STING Pathway Induces Tumor Immunity

MEDICALRESEARCH.COM INTERVIEW WITH:

THOMAS W. DUBENSKY, JR., PH.D.</strong> CHIEF SCIENTIFIC OFFICER ADURO BIOTECH, INC.

DR. THOMAS W. DUBENSKY, Jr.

THOMAS W. DUBENSKY, JR., PH.D.
CHIEF SCIENTIFIC OFFICER
ADURO BIOTECH, INC.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This presentation highlights findings from multiple preclinical models evaluating ADU-S100 (also known as MIW815), Aduro Biotech’s investigational STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes) Pathway Activator immunotherapy. The company is developing ADU-S100 in partnership with Novartis.

ADU-S100 is a synthetic ‘off-the-shelf’ small molecule immune modulator that is designed to generate a response against a patient’s own unique set of cancer antigens. It does this through the activation of human STING. STING is generally expressed at high levels in immune cells, including dendritic cells. Once activated, the STING receptor initiates a profound innate immune response through multiple pathways, inducing the expression of a broad profile of cytokines, including interferons and chemokines. This subsequently leads to the development of a systemic tumor antigen-specific T-cell adaptive immune response.

We conducted preclinical studies in a variety of preclinical models to better understand the potential mechanism of action of ADU-S100 and its potential for treating a variety of cancer types, both within the immediate tumor environment, as well as throughout the body. Data from these preclinical studies suggest the following:

  • Intratumoral injection of ADU-S100 activates the STING Pathway and induces both a durable local and systemic anti-tumor immune response as evidenced by induction of type I interferons (IFNs) and a CD8+ T-cell response.
  • ADU-S100 is able to induce tumor-specific memory mediated by immune cells (e.g. T-cells and NK-cells) whereby the immune system is able to eliminate specific cancerous cells upon their reintroduction without further therapy.
  • Combination of STING activation in the tumor microenvironment and an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor enhances antitumor efficacy activation of the STING pathway, resulting in the complete eradication of local and distal tumors.

Continue reading

Juvenile Arthritis: TNF Inhibitor Use Doesn’t Appear To Increase Malignancy Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Timothy Beukelman, MD, MSCE Associate Professor of Pediatrics Division of Rheumatology and Division of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology University of Alabama at Birmingham

Dr. Timothy Beukelman

Timothy Beukelman, MD, MSCE
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Division of Rheumatology and
Division of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology
University of Alabama at Birmingham

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In 2009 the US FDA issued a boxed warning about malignancies reported in children treated with TNF inhibitors but their analysis did not account for a possible malignancy risk from other medications of from the Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) disease process itself.

Continue reading