Zoledronic Acid Cost-Effective In Preventing Skeletal Events in Patients With Bone Metatstases

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr-Charles L Shapiro.jpg

Dr. Shapiro

Charles L.Shapiro MD
Professor of Medicine
Director of Translational Breast Cancer Research
Director of Cancer Survivorship
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Tisch Cancer Institute
New York, NY

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The new 2017 ASCO guidelines for the use bone-modifying in individuals with bone metastases recently endorsed every 3-month zoledronic, because of high level evidence from three randomized trials, including our trial (published in Jama in Jan 2017, first author Himelstein et al) that giving zoledronic acid every 3-months was non-inferior to the standard of monthly zoledronic. The guidelines also concluded that there was not one preferred bone modifying agent of the other, despite the fact the comparing monthly zoledronic to monthly denosumab in women with bone metastases, denosumab delayed the time to first skeletal-related event (pathological fractures, necessity for radiation or surgery, and spinal cord compression) and subsequent events by 23% (or in absolute terms about 3 months) . Zoledronic acid became generic in 2013, whereas monthly denosumab is still patented until 2022-25.

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African Americans Do Worse After Joint Replacements, But Only In Disadvantaged Neighborhoods

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Susan M. Goodman, MD Director of the Integrative Rheumatology and Orthopedics Center of Excellence Hospital for Special Surgery

Dr. Goodman

Susan M. Goodman, MD
Director of the Integrative Rheumatology and Orthopedics Center of Excellence
Hospital for Special Surgery 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We have previously reported that African Americans who have poorer health outcomes, may be disproportionately impacted by community factors. For African Americans undergoing knee replacement, no difference in pain and function was seen compared to whites in communities with little poverty, while in poor communities, African Americans had poorer outcomes. We wondered if this was generally true or if this only applied to knee replacements.

We found similar results; African Americans in richer neighborhoods have comparable outcomes to whites, but as poverty increases- in this study measured as percent with Medicaid coverage- outcomes worsen in a step wise fashion.

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Is RICE Best After Injury? Study Suggests Rest Prolongs Recovery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Monika Bayer PhD. Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen Bispebjerg Hospital Denmark

Dr. Bayer

Monika Bayer PhD.
Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen
Bispebjerg Hospital
Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Acute muscle strain injuries display a major clinical problem with a high incidence rate for both professional and amateur athletes and are associated with substantial risk for recurrence. Common clinical practice advices to follow the RICE (Rest – Ice – Compression – Elevation) principle after strain injuries but it has not been investigated whether patients really benefit from a period of rest or whether an early of loading following the injury would improve recovery.

In this study, amateur athletes were divided into two groups: one group started rehabilitation two days after the trauma, the other group waited for one week and began rehabilitation after nine days. All athletes had a clear structural defect of the muscle-connective tissue unit following explosive movements. We found that protraction of rehabilitation onset caused a three-week delay in pain-free recovery. In all athletes included, only one suffered from a re-injury.

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Hip and Knee Replacements More Common In Patients With Transthryretin Cardiac Amyloidosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Mathew Maurer, Medical Director The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.

Dr. Maurer

Dr. Mathew Maurer, Medical Director
The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center
NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Transthryretin cardiac amyloidosis (TTR-CA) is an underdiagnosed type of cardiomyopathy in which TTR (transthyretin, also known as prealbumin), a protein that forms amyloid fibrils, deposits in the heart. The deposits cause thickening of the ventricular wall and diastolic as well as systolic dysfunction. It is usually discovered around age 75 and presents more commonly in men than in women. With advances in non-invasive diagnostic modalities and growing awareness, TTR-CA is being diagnosed increasingly more frequently. Additionally, there are several emerging treatments that are under active investigation. Most of these therapies prevent disease progression and don’t address the amyloid already deposited in the heart. Accordingly, it is imperative that we diagnose TTR-CA before patients develop significant amyloid heart disease. However, this presents a great challenge since there are few known clinical predictors that might alert even the most astute physician that a patient is at such risk. With identification of predictors that may appropriately raise the index of clinical suspicion, clinicians may begin to pick up more subtle (and perhaps not yet clinically significant) forms of TTR-CA and initiate treatment before significant damage occurs.

The few known clinical predictors of TTR-CA include bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and lumbar spinal stenosis, and numerous studies found TTR on biopsies and autopsies of other musculoskeletal sites, particularly in hip and knee joints. (Just last week, and also discussed here on MedicalResearch.com, biceps tendon rupture was also shown to occur more frequently in TTR-CA!) We suspected that patients who ultimately develop TTR-CA may first develop clinically significant hip and knee disease, enough to even warrant a hip (THA) or knee (TKA) replacement.

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Ruptured Biceps Tendon and Wild-type Transthyretin Amyloidosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Avinainder Singh, M.B.B.S. Research Fellow Cardiovascular Medicine Brigham & Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston, MA

Dr. Singh

Avinainder Singh, M.B.B.S.
Research Fellow
Cardiovascular Medicine
Brigham & Women’s Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Amyloidosis due to aberrant folding of proteins. These misfolded proteins can deposit in various parts of the body and lead to organ dysfunction. The two most common types of amyloidosis affecting the heart include transthyretin and light chain amyloidosis. Transthyretin is a protein produced by the liver which supports the transport of thyroxine and retinol.

Wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRwt, previously known as senile amyloidosis) occurs due to deposition of misfolded fibrils derived from transthyretin and primarily affects elderly men. Once considered a rare disease, it is now reported to be responsible for nearly 13% of heart failure with preserved ejected fraction and increased wall thickness.

Rupture of the biceps tendon is a rare occurrence in the general population (<1 per 1000). We noticed a ruptured biceps tendon in several patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis and performed this study to further evaluate this finding in a group of patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis and in a control group of age-matched patients with non-amyloid heart failure.

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Long Acting Local Anesthetic Reduced Need For Opioids After Knee Replacement

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael A. Mont, MD Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Cleveland Clinic Cleveland, OH

Dr. Mont

Michael A. Mont, MD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, OH 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a major hurdle for both the patients and the orthopaedists. Many analgesic modalities are currently in use, and can be used alone or in combination in order to augment their effect. Addition of local anesthetic analgesia has been shown to improve pain control and reduce opioid consumption during postoperative period. However, the effects of this analgesia tend to dissipate with time, with the longest duration of action (bupivacaine) of approximately 12 hours. Therefore, long acting local anesthetic (liposomal bupivacaine) has been developed in order to expand the duration of effectiveness of pain relief for up to 96 hours. Many studies evaluated the effectiveness of this anesthetic and demonstrated contradictory results, however, they did not use the same methods and infiltration technique. Therefore, we conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study at 16 hospitals using optimal infiltration techniques. Our study demonstrated significant improvement in pain, decreased opioid consumption, increased time to first opioid rescue, more opioid free patients in liposomal bupivacaine cohort. In addition, there were no unexpected safety concerns.

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Perinatal and Maternal Adverse Events After Attempted Operative Vaginal Delivery at MidPelvic Station

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Giulia Muraca, MPH, PhD(c) Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar School of Population and Public Health Child & Family Research Institute Faculty of Medicine University of British Columbia

Dr. Muraca

Giulia Muraca, MPH, PhD(c)
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar
School of Population and Public Health
Child & Family Research Institute
Faculty of Medicine
University of British Columbia 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The rate of cesarean delivery has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. And in an effort to curb the rising trend in caesarean delivery, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine have recently advocated for increased use of operative vaginal delivery (forceps/vacuum delivery) as a strategy to reduce the cesarean delivery rate. The evaluation of approaches to achieve this end are underway and the current discourse surrounding operative vaginal delivery centers on methods to promote these important skills. But, the truth is, we don’t yet fully understand the balance of risks and benefits to mothers and their babies following operative vaginal delivery compared with caesarean delivery.

The preferred choice given these two options relies heavily on how far the baby’s head has descended in the birth canal. If the baby’s head has descended far enough that it is visible and on the perineum, then the use of an instrument has clear advantage. However, when the fetal head is engaged in the maternal pelvis, but has not descended so far down the birth canal, the decision between these modes of delivery becomes much less clear. These deliveries are called midpelvic deliveries. And it’s an increase in these midpelvic deliveries that would have the most potential as a strategy to reduce the cesarean delivery rate, and as a result, it is these deliveries that we were interested in studying.

Operative vaginal deliveries are carried out in approximately 14% of all term births in Canada and those that occur when the baby is at midpelvic station account for over 20% of all operative vaginal deliveries. This translates to about 2-3% of all term, singleton deliveries in Canada or about 10,000 deliveries per year overall.

The literature on perinatal and maternal outcomes contrasting midpelvic operative vaginal delivery and caesarean delivery is based on studies undertaken 25 to 30 years ago that are no longer reflective of the current obstetric practice.  This was the impetus for our study. We reasoned that before we decide to encourage increased OVD we should first get a sense of the safety of such procedures compared to cesarean delivery as provided by contemporary maternity care providers.

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Young Athletes Who Specialize In Single Sport May Raise Risk of Overuse Injury

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jacqueline Pasulka, OMS II
Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine , Des Moines , IA
Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago , Chicago , IL

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In this study young athletes were recruited from both sports medicine and general practice clinics and were asked to complete surveys reporting on their sports participation, training patterns, and any sports-related injuries they had over the previous six months. We focused this study on the subset of athletes who met the criteria for being a single-sport specialized athlete based on their reported participation in only one sport and training for eight months or more during the year for that sport. Athletes participating in individual sports were more likely to be single-sport specialized than their team sport peers, and they also reported an earlier age at which they began specializing in their sport. Additionally, injury types differed among these two groups as single-sport specialized athletes in individual sport athletes had a greater proportion of overuse injuries, while single-sport specialized athletes in team sport athletes had a greater proportion of acute injuries.

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Low Magnesium May Be Linked To Increased Risk of Hip Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Setor Kunutsor Ba(Legon), MBChB(Legon), MA(Cantab), PhD(Cantab) Research Fellow Musculoskeletal Research Unit University of Bristol

Dr. Kunutsor

Dr Setor Kunutsor Ba(Legon), MBChB(Legon), MA(Cantab), PhD(Cantab)
Research Fellow
Musculoskeletal Research Unit
University of Bristol

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Bone fractures are one of the leading causes of disability and ill health especially among the ageing population and are a burden to health care systems. There is established evidence that calcium and vitamin D play an important role in bone health.

Magnesium is an essential trace element, being the second most abundant intracellular cation after potassium and the fourth most abundant cation in the body. It serves several important functions in the body, which include protein synthesis, nucleic acid synthesis, enzymatic reactions, and has also been shown to be cardio-protective. It is also an important component of bone, with majority (67 percent) of total body magnesium known to be found in the bone tissue. There have been suggestions from both human and animal experiments that magnesium may have a beneficial effect on bone health; however, its relationship with fractures is not very certain.

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Evaluation of Athletic Hip Injuries

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Christopher M. Larson, M.D. Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute Twin Cities Orthopedics Edina, MN

Dr. Christopher Larson

Christopher M. Larson, M.D.
Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute
Twin Cities Orthopedics
Edina, MN  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Until recently Athletic Hip and Pelvis disorders and the appropriate treatment strategies have not received the same attention as other sports related disorders.  There is significant overlap between intra-articular and extra-articular hip disorders that make this a challenging area of sports medicine from a diagnosis and treatment standpoint.

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Radiation Exposure in the Pediatric Patient: What Every Orthopaedist Should Know

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ayesha Rahman, MD

Chief Orthopaedic Surgery Resident
NYU Langone Medical Center.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Children are more vulnerable and susceptible to lifetime adverse events from radiation exposure, caused by imaging . We reviewed literature and found certain pediatric orthopaedic patients are at greater risk for radiation exposure, namely those who have surgery for hip dysplasia, scoliosis, and leg length discrepancy, as they are among those most likely to undergo CT imaging. After reviewing all types of imaging studies performed in orthopedics and how much radiation is involved in each test, we developed several recommendations that pediatric orthopaedic surgeons should follow.

Among those recommendations are: utilize low-dose CT protocols or technology that uses less imaging (like EOS), limit CT scans of the spine and pelvis, know that female patients are more susceptible to adverse risk and plan accordingly, and follow the the “as low as reasonably achievable,”principle to limit exposure to parts of the body that are necessary for diagnosis.

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Psoriasis Patients At Higher Risk for Multiple Pathological Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH

Assistant Professor in Dermatology
Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH Assistant Professor in Dermatology Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Dr. Jonathan Silverberg

Response: Psoriasis is associated with a number of potential risk factors for developing osteoporosis and pathological fractures, including including low vitamin D, chronic inflammation, higher rates of cigarette smoking and systemic corticosteroid usage. We hypothesized that adults with psoriasis have higher rates of osteoporosis and pathological fractures.

We examined data from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, which contains a representative 20% sample of all hospitalizations in the United States. We found that psoriasis was associated with higher odds of osteopenia, osteoporosis, osteomalacia, ankylosing spondylitis, and pathological fractures. In particular, psoriasis was associated with vertebral, pelvic, femoral and tibial/fibular fractures. The associations between psoriasis and pathological fractures were more pronounced in women than men.

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Patients Can Expect To Return To Normal Function Relatively Quickly After Knee Arthroscopy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Patients Can Expect To Return To Normal Function Relatively Quickly After Knee Arthroscopy MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Alexis Colvin, MD Associate Professor, Orthopaedics Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai James N. Gladstone, MD Co-Chief, Sports Medicine Service, The Mount Sinai Hospital Associate Professor, Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Knee arthroscopy is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the U.S. There is minimal literature on when patients can expect to return to daily activity. We sought to help patients understand when they could expect to return to a number of basic activities, specifically in an urban environment where patients need to be mobile early. MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings? Response: Our findings included: • Patients are off narcotics within 7 days, • Patients stop use of a cane/crutches at 8 days • Patients can drive after 14 days • Patients can go up subway stairs at 20 days • Patients sit on a toilet comfortably at 14 days • Patients return to work at 15 days MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? Response: Patients can expect to return to relatively normal function within a short amount of time. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Response: We will also be looking at what other factors, such as age, BMI, medical co-morbidities, etc. can also influence how fast patients recover from this very common surgery. MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add? Response: MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community. Citation: 2017 AAOS abstract Return to Daily Life After Meniscectomy Alexis C. Colvin, MD, New York, NY James Dieterich, BA, New York, NY James N. Gladstone, MD, New York, NY Diana Patterson, MD, New York, NY Arthroscopic meniscectomy is a frequently performed procedure, but minimal guidelines exist for counseling patients on functionality during the recovery period or time to return to daily activities. http://www.aaos.org/uploadedFiles/2017%20Final%20Program_compressed.pdf Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions. More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Dr. Colvin

Alexis Colvin, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedics
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

James N. Gladstone, MD Co-Chief, Sports Medicine Service, The Mount Sinai Hospital Associate Professor, Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Gladstone

James N. Gladstone, MD
Co-Chief, Sports Medicine Service, The Mount Sinai Hospital
Associate Professor, Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Knee arthroscopy is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the U.S. There is minimal literature on when patients can expect to return to daily activity.

We sought to help patients understand when they could expect to return to a number of basic activities, specifically in an urban environment where patients need to be mobile early.

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The Opioid Epidemic and Orthopaedic Pain Management

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Hammoud

Dr. Sommer Hammoud

Dr. Sommer Hammoud MD
ABOS Board Certified Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery
Thomas Jefferson University 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this exhibit stemmed from the growing problem of prescription opioid abuse in the United States.  As we saw this issue developing, we aimed to investigate the history behind this epidemic, what information we have now to fight it, and what information we need in the future to improve care our patients.

Our main findings for each of those aims are the following:

1) It would appear that a large push at the end of the last century led to a lower threshold to prescribe opiates in the effort to control pain, leading to the current opioid epidemic
2) Mulitmodal methods of pain control and the expanding skill of regional anesthesia can be used to help decrease narcotic use and thus limit exposure to narcotics, and
3) Future research needs to focus on the psychologic aspect of patients’ ability to manage pain and we should strive to be able to categorize patients in order to create an individualized pain management protocol which will most effectively manage pain.

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Risk Factors For Adverse Events After Total Shoulder Replacement

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Brad Parsons, MD Associate Professor, Orthopaedics Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Parsons

Brad Parsons, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedics
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: As bundled payment initiatives increase in order to contain health care costs, total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is a likely future target.

Understanding modifiable drivers of complications and unplanned readmission as well as identifying when such events occur will be critical for orthopedic surgeons and hospitals to improve outcomes and to make fixed-price payment models feasible for TSA.

Utilizing the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program we identified 5801 patients that underwent TSA with a 2.7% readmission rate and 2.5% severe adverse event rate. Patients with 3 or more risk factors were found to have a significantly increased risk of readmission and severe adverse events within the first two weeks postoperatively.

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The Short Form KOOS, Jr Is Valid for Revision Knee Arthroplasty

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alexander S. McLawhorn, MD, MBA Orthopedic Surgery, Hip and Knee Replacement Hospital for Special Surgery New York, NY 10021

Dr. McLawhorn

Alexander S. McLawhorn, MD, MBA
Orthopedic Surgery, Hip and Knee Replacement
Hospital for Special Surgery
New York, NY 10021

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) researchers saw the need for a shorter, more patient friendly outcome survey for revision knee replacement surgery. This is an area where patient-reported outcomes data are essential to improving quality of care. In fact, knee replacement revisions, which are more complex and heterogeneous than primary knee surgery, are under-studied in this regard.

A commonly used knee replacement survey, the KOOS (Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), is 42 questions and often leaves physicians with partial and unusable information secondary to patient burden and fatigue. Previously, researchers at HSS created the KOOS, JR, which is a shorter, 7-question survey that accurately measures “knee health”, meaning it reflects aspects of pain, symptom severity, and activities of daily living relevant and difficult for patients with knee arthritis. The current research presented at AAOS showed that the KOOS, JR can be extended to knee replacement revision patients and that it is a valid and efficient tool for assessing knee health in this challenging patient population.

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High School Students Increasingly Specializing in One Sport

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael G. Ciccotti, MD Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Rothman Institute Chief of Sports Medicine, and Director of the Sports Medicine Fellowship Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Michael Ciccotti

Michael G. Ciccotti, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Rothman Institute
Chief of Sports Medicine, and
Director of the Sports Medicine Fellowship
Thomas Jefferson University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? 

Response: No doubt sports plays a huge role in the United States and all over world with millions of young people between the ages 6 and 18 participating in an organized sport on a regular basis.

Over the past decade, there has been a tremendous focus on youth single sport specialization (SSS), with pressure from coaches, parents and the athletes themselves to participate in one sport year round. Many participants, coaches and parents believe that early specialization may allow the young athlete to become better and progress more quickly in their sport, perhaps allowing them a greater chance of becoming a professional athlete. This drive toward early specialization has been fueled by popular icons i.e. Tiger Woods (golf) and Lionel “Leo” Messi (soccer) as well as by media hits such as Friday Night Tykes (young football players) and The Short Game (7-year old golfers). The pop-psych writer, Malcolm Gladwell, whose The 10,000 Hour Rule (in his book Outliers) holds that 10,000 hours of “deliberate practice” are needed to become world-class in any field may have also encouraged the specialization trend.

There is little doubt that youth sports may encourage a lifelong interest in a healthy lifestyle as well as improved self-esteem and social relationships. The flip side is that extreme training and singular focus on a sport can lead to stress on the developing musculo-skeletal system, a pressure to succeed at all costs, reduced fun, burnout and sometimes social isolation.

The dilemma we are beginning to scratch the surface of is does single sport specialization enhance the likelihood of getting to an elite level and does it increase the risk of injury? There is a growing sense in the medical community that SSS raises injury risk without enhancing progression to a higher level.

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How Does Spinal Deformity Impact Hip Stability?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Aaron J. Buckland Spinal and scoliosis surgeon and assistant professor Orthopedic surgery NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Aaron Buckland

Dr Aaron J. Buckland
Spinal and scoliosis surgeon and
Assistant professor
Orthopedic surgery
NYU Langone Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: For decades, surgeons performing hip replacements have placed the acetabular component adjacent to the pelvis in a “safe zone” which has been shown to reduce dislocation risk. However, beginning in residency, I would notice that several of my patients with spinal deformities or lumbar fusions, would experience dislocations despite the safe zone placement of these implants. Our initial research demonstrated that there was an increased dislocation risk in patients with lumbar fusions, particularly if they underwent spinal realignment. We investigated this phenomenon further by retrospectively reviewing 107 patients who met the criteria for sagittal spinal deformity, including 139 hip replacements collectively.

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Despite Guidelines, Low Proportion of Elderly Hip Fracture Patients Are Consistently Taking Vitamin D

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Sheila Sprague, PhD Assistant Professor, Research Methodologist McMaster University

Dr. Sheila Sprague

Dr. Sheila Sprague, PhD
Assistant Professor, Research Methodologist
McMaster University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Previous research has found that daily administration of vitamin D is important for maintaining bone homeostasis. There has been an increased interest among the orthopaedic community regarding vitamin D supplementation and patient outcomes following fractures. Using data from the FAITH trial (NCT01908751), a multicenter randomized controlled trial that compared cancellous screws versus sliding hip screws in patients over the age of 50 with femoral neck fractures, we:

1) determined the proportion of patients consistently taking vitamin D following hip fracture surgery and
2) determined if supplementation was associated with improved health related quality of life and reduced re-operation.

Patients enrolled in the FAITH trial were recruited from 81 clinical sites in 8 countries over a 6-year span. We asked a subset of them about vitamin D supplementation and categorized them as consistent users, inconsistent users, or non-users.

The final analysis included 573 patients and we found that a surprisingly low proportion of elderly hip fracture patients are consistently taking vitamin D (18.7% of patients reported never taking vitamin D, 35.6% reported inconsistent use, and 45.7% reported consistent use). We also found that vitamin D was associated with a statistically (p=0.033), but not clinically, significant improvement in health-related quality of life following a hip fracture. Lastly, supplementation was discovered to not be associated with reduced re-operation (p=0.386).

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Hip vs Lumbar Spine Pain Can Be Difficult to Differentiate

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Afshin E. Razi MD</strong> Clinical Assistant Professor NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases Department of Orthopaedic Surgery New York, N.Y. 1001

Dr. Afshin Razi

Afshin E. Razi MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
New York, N.Y. 10016

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We did an extensive literature search and through our two previous seminars on this topic we were able to gather information to aid our colleagues on best ways of differentiating causes of hip and back pain. As an orthopaedic surgeon specializing in spine surgery I encounter many patients who present with concomitant back and hip pain. Many of these patients are also referred to me by surgeons who solely take care of hip problems such as total hip replacement or sport medicine specialist who treat younger patients with hip pain. It can be very difficult to properly diagnose the main issue and as such some patients go on to have unnecessary treatments, including surgery, because of their persistent symptoms. It was our goal to try to educate physicians, including orthopaedic surgeons, on the common differential diagnoses, appropriate clinical history and physical examination, diagnostic tools and their evaluations appropriately, as well as treatment options and priorities of which one to be treated first. More recently, it has been noted that some patients who have undergone total hip replacement with significant curvature of the spine had postoperative dislocation of the hip after reconstruction of the spinal malalignment. This article also talks about this newly seen problem.

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Hip Fractures Increase Mortality Risk in Cognitively Impaired Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ann L. Gruber-Baldini, Ph.D. Professor, Division of Gerontology Director, Program in Epidemiology and Human Genetics  Department of Epidemiology & Public Health University of Maryland School of Medicine

Dr. Ann Gruber-Baldini

Ann L. Gruber-Baldini, Ph.D.
Professor, Division of Gerontology
Director, Program in Epidemiology and Human Genetics
Department of Epidemiology & Public Health
University of Maryland School of Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: While men make up only about 25% of all hip fractures, the number of men who fracture their hip is increasing and we know men are more likely to die than women after a hip fracture. It is also known that those with cognitive impairments, typically due to delirium and Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, are more likely to do more poorly after the fracture. The impact of both sex and cognition on outcomes after hip fracture has not been fully explored.

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Is the Benefit of Arthroscopic Meniscus Surgery a Placebo Effect?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jonas Bloch Thorlund Associate Professor (MSc, PhD) Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Function and Physiotherapy University of Southern Denmark

Dr. Jonas Thorlund

Jonas Bloch Thorlund
Associate Professor (MSc, PhD)
Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics
Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Function and Physiotherapy
University of Southern Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is a very common knee surgery. Research evidence has seriously questioned the effect of this type of surgery for degenerative meniscal tears in middle-aged and older patients. Most young patients with traumatic meniscal injury (from sports or similar) also undergo this type of surgery. There is a general understanding that young patients with traumatic tears experience larger improvements in patient reported pain, function and quality of life. However, evidence for this presumption is sparse.

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Bundled Payment For Joint Replacements Saved Hospitals and CMS Money

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Amol Navathe, MD PhD University of Pennsylvania Staff Physician, CHERP, Philadelphia VA Medical Center Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, The Wharton School Co-Editor-in-Chief, HealthCare: the Journal of Delivery Science and Innovatio

Dr. Amol Navathe


Amol Navathe, MD PhD

University of Pennsylvania
Staff Physician, CHERP,
Philadelphia VA Medical Center
Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine
Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, The Wharton School
Co-Editor-in-Chief, HealthCare: the Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Bundled payments pay a fixed price for an episode of services that starts at hospital admission (in this case for joint replacement surgery) and extends 30-90 days post discharge (30 days in this study). This includes physician fees, other provider services (e.g. physical therapy), and additional acute hospital care (hospital admissions) in that 30 day window.

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Psoriasis Associated With Increased Risk of Avascular Bone Death

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Psoriasis

Psoriasis

Hsien-Yi Chiu, MD/
Tsen-Fang Tsai, MD

Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital
Taipei, Taiwan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by red, itchy and scaly skin patches. Over the past several years, accumulating research had shown the effects of psoriasis go far deeper than the skin and psoriasis is associated with multiple comorbidities.

Psoriasis shares the inflammatory pathways and several contributing factors with avascular necrosis (AVN), a bone disease presented with death of trabecular bone and collapse of the bony structure. However, previous studies mostly focus on evaluation the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with psoriasis. No large scale studies have previously explored a potential association between psoriasis and AVN.

Our nationwide population-based cohort study investigated this risk in 28268 patients with psoriasis registered in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The patients were matched, by age and sex, with 113072 controls without psoriasis. Both the patients and controls were followed to identify those who subsequently diagnosed with an AVN. The results showed that psoriasis was associated with a disease severity–dependent increase in avascular necrosis risk. Moreover, AVN risk was positively associated with male sex, age younger than 30 years, corticosteroid use, severe psoriasis, and concomitant psoriatic arthritis. People with severe psoriasis were 3 times more likely to develop AVN compared with the control group.

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Cardiac Disease Linked To Elevated Risk of Shoulder Pain and Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kurt T. Hegmann, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health Chief, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health The University of Utah Health Care

Dr. Kurt Hegmann

Kurt T. Hegmann, M.D., M.P.H.
Director, Rocky Mtn. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health
Chief, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health
The University of Utah Health Care

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This line of work for us began approximately 20 years ago.

Normal tendons never rupture, as the weak point when loading the muscle-tendon unit is either the muscle-tendon junction (i.e., a true muscle strain) or bone-tendon junction. Researchers in the 1960s reported there is poor blood supply in the area of rotator cuff tendon tears, providing one of the two main etiological theories of rotator cuff tears. The other main theory is “impingement syndrome” or a biomechanical impingement in the shoulder joint. Naturally, both theories could co-exist.

Next, we noted rotator cuff tendinitis and shoulder risks from tobacco in other studies. We also reported prior research of increased risks with obesity. These led us to the theory that these rotator cuff tears are likely vascular in etiology. The next problem was to show this.

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Patients Greatly Underestimate Reimbursement For Orthopedic Procedures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kelechi Okoroha, M.D. Orthopaedic Surgery House Officer Henry Ford Health System

Dr. Kelechi Okoroha

Kelechi Okoroha, M.D.
Orthopaedic Surgery House Officer
Henry Ford Health System

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Historically, patient perceptions of surgeon reimbursement have been exaggerated compared with actual reimbursement. Currently there has been an increased focus or reducing health care cost, increasing access to health care and a shift to tie Medicare and insurance reimbursement to quality outcomes. Among these changes was the reduction in reimbursement payments for orthopedic surgeons. When we polled over 200 of our clinic patients, we found that most patients don’t think an orthopedic surgeon is overpaid but they greatly exaggerate how much a surgeon is reimbursed by Medicare for performing knee surgery. When told of the reimbursement payments, patients found them too be low and said they would be willing to pay more out-of-pocket costs. Patients also believe a surgeon should be compensated more for having fellowship training.

• Nearly 90 percent of patients say physicians are not overpaid and their salaries should not be cut.
• 61 percent of patients say a surgeon’s salary should not be tied to outcomes.
• 79 percent of patients say reimbursement to drug and device companies should be reduced.

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Stem Cells From Nose Used To Repair Knee Cartilage

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Professor Ivan Martin, PhD Department of Surgery and Department of Biomedicine University Hospital Basel University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

Prof. Ivan Martin

Professor Ivan Martin, PhD
Department of Surgery and Department of Biomedicine
University Hospital Basel
University of Basel
Basel, Switzerland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study and new use of autologous nasal chondrocytes?

Response: We previously demonstrated that nasal chondrocytes, harvested from the nasal septum, have a larger and more reproducible capacity to form new cartilage than articular chondrocytes, harvested from the knee joint. We further established that the cartilage tissue generated by nasal chondrocytes can respond to physical forces (mechanical loads) similar to articular cartilage and has the ‘plasticity’ to adapt to a joint environment, since it efficiently integrated with surrounding articular cartilage when implanted in goat joints. This was the rationale for using nasal chondrocytes for articular cartilage repair.

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Romosozumab Has Potential To Reduce New Vertebral Fractures at 12 Months

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Felicia Cosman, M.D.

Dr. Felicia Cosman

Felicia Cosman, M.D.
Medical Director of the Clinical Research Center
Helen Hayes Hospital
Professor of Medicine
Columbia University College of Physician and Surgeons
New York
Editor-in-Chief, Osteoporosis International

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Amgen and UCB presented detailed data from the Phase 3 FRAME study in an oral session at ASBMR 2016, and the data were also published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Additionally, the FRAME abstract has been awarded the 2016 ASBMR Most Outstanding Clinical Abstract Award. The FRAME data show significant reductions in both new vertebral and clinical fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

Patients receiving a monthly subcutaneous 210 mg dose of romosozumab experienced a statistically significant 73 percent reduction in the relative risk of a vertebral (spine) fracture through 12 months, the co-primary endpoint, compared to those receiving placebo (fracture incidence 0.5 percent vs. 1.8 percent, respectively [p<0.001]). By six months, new vertebral fractures occurred in 14 romosozumab and 26 placebo patients; between six to 12 months, fractures occurred in two versus 33 additional patients in each group, respectively.

Patients receiving romosozumab experienced a statistically significant 36 percent reduction in the relative risk of a clinical fracture, a secondary endpoint, through 12 months compared to those receiving placebo (fracture incidence 1.6 percent vs. 2.5 percent, respectively [p=0.008]).

In patients who received romosozumab in year one, fracture risk reduction continued through month 24 after both groups transitioned to denosumab treatment through the second year of the study: there was a statistically significant 75 percent reduction in the risk of vertebral fracture at month 24 (the other co-primary endpoint) in patients who received romosozumab followed by denosumab vs. placebo followed by denosumab (fracture incidence 0.6 percent vs. 2.5 percent, respectively [p<0.001]).

Clinical fractures encompass all symptomatic fractures (both non-vertebral and painful vertebral fractures; all clinical fractures assessed in the FRAME study were symptomatic fragility fractures. A 33 percent reduction in relative risk of clinical fracture was observed through 24 months after patients transitioned from romosozumab to denosumab compared to patients transitioning from placebo to denosumab (nominal p=0.002, adjusted p=0.096).

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MRI Not Always Better Than Regular X Rays For Knee Pain Evaluation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr-Muyibat-Adelani.jpg

Dr. Muyibat Adelani

Muyibat Adelani, MD
Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Washington University
St. Louis

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In our practice, we noticed that more patients are coming in already having had MRIs. We wanted to know how many people actually had weight-bearing knee x-rays before the MRI. We found that only a quarter of patients had weight-bearing x-rays before the MRI. We found that half of the MRIs obtained prior to referral to an orthopaedic surgeon did not contribute to the patient’s treatment.

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Key Risk Factors of Non-Healing Bone Fractures Identified

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

R. Grant Steen, PhD Medical Affairs, Bioventus LLC Durham, North Carolina

Dr. R. Grant Steen

R. Grant Steen, PhD
Medical Affairs,
Bioventus LLC
Durham, North Carolina

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: When we started this research, it was really only guesswork as to how big a problem fracture nonunion really is. What we’ve done is to work with an enormous database of patient health claims, with two goals.

First, we wanted to characterize how common fracture nonunion is among patients across a wide age range.
Second, we wanted to identify risk factors that make a patient more likely to have problems healing.

We’ve now succeeded in both aims. We know that roughly 5% of fracture patients will go to nonunion, and we know a whole host of risk factors that predispose them to do so.
Most of the risk factors that we’ve identified—with a few exceptions—would not be a surprise to physicians who treat fracture patients. However, what we’ve done is to put all of these risk factors in a broader context, so that we know which risk factors are most important and which are less so.

For example, it has been known for a long time that smoking is a risk factor for nonunion. What we’ve shown is that, in the scheme of things, it’s not all that important. Let me be more precise here, because this is an important point. If all you know about a patient is that they smoke, we’ve shown that smoking is associated with a 62% increase in risk of nonunion. That’s a lot. But, as you learn more about that patient and can factor that new knowledge into a risk prediction, it turns out that smoking, all by itself, increases the risk of nonunion by only about 20%. However, smoking is a surrogate marker for a range of other risk factors that also increase risk, including male gender, cardiovascular disease, obesity, vitamin D deficiency, alcoholism, and so on. Once you factor these separate risk factors into your new nonunion prediction, you have a much more nuanced—and probably much more accurate—prediction of nonunion risk.
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May Be No Need For A Pitch Restriction After Tommy John Surgery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Brandon J. Erickson, MD Midwest Orthopaedics Rush, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL

Dr. Brandon Erickson

Brandon J. Erickson, MD
Midwest Orthopaedics
Rush, Rush University Medical Center
Chicago, IL

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR), also known as Tommy John surgery has become a common procedure amongst major league baseball (MLB) pitchers. It is unclear if a limit on innings pitched following Tommy John surgery should be instituted to prevent revision Tommy John surgery.

The purpose of this study was to determine if innings pitched following Tommy John surgery is associated with an increased risk of revision Tommy John surgery amongst MLB pitchers. To answer this question we located all MLB pitchers between 1974-2015 who pitched at least one full season following their Tommy John surgery and included them in our analysis. Pitch counts and innings pitched for the first full season following Tommy John surgery as well as total pitch count and total innings pitched over the course of the player’s career were recorded.

Pitch counts and innings pitched were compared amongst players who required revision Tommy John surgery and those who did not. We were able to include 154 pitchers. Of these, 135 pitchers did not require revision Tommy John surgery while 19 underwent revision Tommy John surgery.  No significant difference existed between pitchers who underwent revision Tommy John surgery and those who did not when comparing number of innings pitched in the season following Tommy John surgery,  number of pitches thrown in the season following Tommy John surgery,  number of innings pitched in the pitcher’s career following Tommy John surgery and number of pitches thrown in the pitcher’s career following Tommy John surgery.  Furthermore, no difference existed in revision rate between pitchers who pitched more or less than 180 innings in the first full season following Tommy John surgery.

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Titanium-Gold Compound May Extend LIfe of Joint Implants

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Emilia Morosan PhD,  Professor  Rice University  Physics and Astronomy  Houston TX 77005

Dr. Emilia Morosan

Emilia Morosan PhD,  Professor
Rice University
Physics and Astronomy
Houston TX 77005

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Dr. Morosan: My group works mainly on searching for compounds with magnetic properties. The first step in the characterization of such compounds is powder X-ray diffraction, which requires grinding the samples to fine powder. When we discovered such a compound based on (titanium) Ti and (gold) Au, we were unable to grind it because of its apparent hardness. This prompted the hardness measurement on the magnetic compound (with equal amounts of Ti and Au) and also on other mixtures of the two metals. The main result of this study was that the particular compound beta-Ti3Au was the hardest among all Ti-Au mixture in our study and compared to previous hardness measurements on these binary alloys. Most remarkable was the four-fold increase in hardens in beta-Ti3Au over Ti, or most other biocompatible engineering alloys. Furthermore, beta-Ti3Au also has higher wear resistance, meaning its durability extends beyond that of other alloys.
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Barefoot Running Changes Strike Pattern in Long Distance Runners

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Marcos Muñoz Jimenez
University of Jaén

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Barefoot running has become very popular in recent years and remains a hotly debated topic among runners. The debate about the pros and cons of barefoot running is current.

Many coaches consider barefoot training to have an effect on muscle strength and to be important for performance and for preventing injuries. The main objective of this study is to determine what changes in foot strike, inversion-eversion and foot rotation are produced after a 12-week programme of barefoot running with progressive volume at the end of the athletes daily training session.

Our data support that a 12-week programme of barefoot running training, applied by progressively increasing the volume of barefoot running, causes significant changes to foot strike patterns with a tendency towards midfoot strike, regardless of running speed.
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Young Women At Increased Risk of Re-Tear After ACL Surgery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Duong Nguyen, Medicine Professional Corporation
MD,MSc(c),FRCSC,DipABOS,DipSportsMed(ABOS),FAAOS,CIME

Dr. Duong Nguyen Medicine Professional Corporation MD,MSc(c),FRCSC,DipABOS,DipSportsMed(ABOS),FAAOS,CIME,DipSportMed(CASEM) Diplomate of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Subspecialty Board Certification in Sports Medicine (ABOS) Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (FRCSC/AAOS) Certified Independent Medical Examiner (ABIME) Diplomate Sport & Exercise Medicine (CASEM) Arthroscopic & Reconstructive Shoulder,Elbow & Knee Surgery Medical Director / Urgent Sports Injury & Fracture Clinic MSc Candidate/ Clinical Epidemiology & Health Research Methodology Adjunct Clinical Professor - McMaster University Toronto, ON.

Dr. Duong Nguyen

Diplomate of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
Subspecialty Board Certification in Sports Medicine
Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Certified Independent Medical Examiner (ABIME)
Diplomate Sport & Exercise Medicine (CASEM)
Arthroscopic & Reconstructive Shoulder,Elbow & Knee Surgery
Medical Director / Urgent Sports Injury & Fracture Clinic
MSc Candidate/ Clinical Epidemiology & Health Research Methodology
Adjunct Clinical Professor – McMaster University
Toronto, ON.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: ACL re-tear after surgery is a serious complication in the sports medicine world with many implications for the athlete such as lost game time, the morbidity of a second surgery and extended rehabilitation, lost scholarship, decreased self esteem and social isolation,as well as decreased academic performance.

We found in our study that athletes who are less than 25, are female, and have a graft size less than 8 mm are at increased risk for ACL re-tear after surgery.

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Large Number of Fastballs Contributes To Need For Tommy John Surgery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robert Keller, M.D., Chief resident Department of Orthopedic Surgery Henry Ford Hospital Detroit

Dr. Robert Keller

Robert Keller, M.D., Chief resident
Department of Orthopedic Surgery
Henry Ford Hospital Detroit

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Keller:  Injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (the ligament torn in pitchers requiring tommy john surgery) are common in overhead-throwing athletes. Recent data supports that the number of MLB pitchers requiring tommy john surgery continues to increase, with estimates near 25% of all MLB pitchers undergoing tommy john surgery.   Recent investigations have attempted to analyze factors that contribute to UCL injuries with the aim to decrease the rate of injury. Studies have suggested that possible risk factors include pitching mechanics, pitch type (curve ball, fastball, etc), g, pitching fatigue, chronic overuse, and pitch velocity, among other factors.

Specifically, increased pitch velocity has been implicated as a risk factor for UCL injury.  However, no study has exclusively attempted to assess whether MLB pitchers who required Tommy John surgery pitch at a higher velocity than those that do not. Pitch type (fastball, curveball, slider, etc) is another significant factor that has been investigated as a contributor to UCL injuries. Various biomechanical studies have attempted to correlate pitch types with torque across the throwing elbow, with contrasting results: some suggest fastballs create more torque, whereas others found off-speed pitches produce increased stresses. Beyond not evaluating MLB pitchers, these previous studies also failed to evaluate the volume or amount of a specific pitch type thrown by these pitchers that may contribute to UCL injuries.

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Very Low Dose CT Scans Successfully Detect Bone Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sanjit Konda, MD Assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Sanjit Konda

Sanjit Konda, MD
Assistant professor of Orthopaedic surgery
NYU Langone Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Konda: We serendipitously found that we could identify periarticular fractures associated with deep knee wounds with the use of a CT-scan. We published a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma showing that a CT scan could identify a traumatic arthrotomy of a joint better than a saline load test, which at the time was considered the diagnostic gold standard. When we presented that work, we received criticism that we were subjecting patients to a high dose of radiation for a diagnostic test; however, our rationale at the time was that the saline load test was a painful, invasive procedure using a needle, and that we would trade a bit of radiation for lack of invasive procedure.

This got us thinking of ways we could decrease the amount of radiation in the CT yet maintain the same diagnostic accuracy of identifying penetrating joint injuries. Collaborating with Dr. Soterios Gyftopoulos, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology at NYU Langone, we were able to successfully reduce the amount of radiation in these CT scans and still get good bony images. We then thought, if we can get a CT scan that shows us good bony detail and is safer, then why shouldn’t we be doing it on every joint fracture, not just these arthrotomy cases? We then applied this to our current research protocol, REDUCTION(Reduced Effective Dose Using Computed Tomography In Orthopaedic Injury) in which we reduced the average amount of radiation from 0.43 msV to 0.03 msV, or down to the average dose given in a routine chest X-ray. After running a comparison study with our ultra-low dose radiation protocol compared to conventional CT scans, we found we were able to obtain nearly the exact same types of images for various joint fractures and locations without sacrificing any diagnostic accuracy in most cases. We gave sets of these CT scans to orthopaedic surgeons to analyze, and found we achieved 98 percent sensitivity and 89 percent specificity with the ultra-low dose CT scans when occult fractures, or those that could not be seen on an X-ray, were removed from our analysis.

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More Serious Hip Injuries in Young Rugby Players

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
David Morrissey MB PhD FRCS (Tr&Orth)
Orthopaedic Specialist Registrar 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Morrissey: Injury rates in rugby union have increased substantially over the past twenty years, both in the professional and amateur game. The pattern of injury has also changed, reflecting higher grades of trauma. Our institution is a tertiary referral centre for pelvic and acetabular trauma serving a population of 4.5 million. The majority of our cases occur as a result of high velocity trauma such as road traffic accidents. We have not previously seen hip dislocations/acetabular fractures occurring secondary to sporting participation. In the past number of years, however, we have identified four such injuries in three juvenile patients, that occurred during rugby union participation. These injury patterns may have sub-optimal outcomes in up to 30% of patients and can severely affect a young person’s life. The demographic change may be due to changes in the physical development of players as well as an increased emphasis on the tackle/ruck area. In the juvenile game, differing rates of maturation magnify size differences between players, potentially increasing the risk of injury.

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NYU’s Orthopedic Bundled Care Plan Reduced Readmissions and Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Richard Iorio, MD Dr. William and Susan Jaffe Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery Chief of the Division of Adult Reconstructive Surgery NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Richard Iorio

Richard Iorio, MD
Dr. William and Susan Jaffe Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Chief of the Division of Adult Reconstructive Surgery
NYU Langone Medical Center 


MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Iorio: NYU Langone Medical Center’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery realized early that alternate payment strategies based on value rather than volume were going to be increasing in prevalence and represent the future of compensation strategies  As leaders in orthopaedics, we knew that we must embrace this change and develop strategies and effective protocols to successfully navigate this alternative payment universe.

In 2011, NYU Langone’s Hospital for Joint Diseases was chosen as a pilot site for CMS’s Bundled Payment Care Initiative, focusing on Medicare patients undergoing a total joint replacement. Beginning in 2013, we implemented protocols developed at our hospital focusing on preoperatiive patient selection criteria in an effort to ensure better outcomes for Medicare patients who underwent total joint replacements. Under a bundled payment program, hospitals assume financial responsibility for any complications over the entire episode of care 90 days after surgery, including postsurgical infections and hospital readmissions.

We compared year over year outcomes from year 1 to year 3 of this program, and found:

  • Average hospital length of stay decreased from 3.58 days to 2.96 days;
  • Discharges to inpatient rehabilitation or care facilities decreased from 44 percent to 28 percent;
  • Average number of readmissions at 30 days decreased from 7 percent to 5 percent; from 11 percent to 6.1 percent at 60 days; and from 13 percent to 7.7 percent at 90 days;
  • The average cost to CMS of the episode of care decreased from $34,249 to $27,541 from year one to year three of the program.

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Partial Meniscectomy Doesn’t Reduce Mechanical Knee Symptoms Any Better Than Sham Procedure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Teppo L N Järvinen MD PhD Sports Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, Clinical Trials University of Helsinki, Helsinki

Dr. Teppo Järvinen

Teppo L N Järvinen MD PhD
Sports Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, Clinical Trials
University of Helsinki, Helsinki

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Järvinen: When the primary analysis of the FIDELITY trial was published in the New England Journal of Medicine (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1305189), showing that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) is no better than sham/placebo surgery in relieving knee pain and improving knee function in patients with a degenerative meniscus tear and no knee OA, the study was met with unprecedented criticism, even hostility. The advocates of APM (which was at the time and probably still is the most common orthopedic procedure in the US and most other “western” countries) argued – despite the fact that our study only confirmed what several other high-quality RCTs had suggested – that  arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is a highly beneficial procedure in the “right” patients. Among the subgroups of patients allegedly having a favourable response to APM, those experiencing “mechanical symptoms” — sensations of knee catching or locking — represented the most obvious group who would benefit from  arthroscopic partial meniscectomy surgery. This assertion is plausible because knee catching or locking is believed to result from a mechanical blocking mechanism in the knee – a piece of the joint structure lodging between the articular surfaces. Because degenerative meniscal tears are very common pathologic alterations found by arthroscopy in the knee joints of patients with degenerative knee disease, trimming the torn meniscus should, in theory at least, improve the apparent mechanical derangement.

Against this background, it is somewhat unusual that no study has yet specifically tested whether  arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is effective in alleviating these symptoms. Mechanical symptoms are usually thought to be a solid indication for arthroscopic knee surgery. This is what we set out to examine in our secondary analysis of our sham-surgery controlled FIDELITY trial.

Our key finding: arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (partial resection of a torn meniscus) does not reduce or alleviate mechanical symptoms any better than a sham surgical procedure.

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Ultra Long Distance Runners Regenerate Cartilage During Race

Uwe Schütz, M.D. Radiologist and specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology University Hospital of Ulm Germany

Dr. Schütz

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Uwe Schütz, M.D.
Radiologist and specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
University Hospital of Ulm
Germany

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Schütz: In this study, which is a small part of the Trans Europe Foot Race (TEFR) TEFR-project, we investigated the question, what happens to the joints, in detail to the joint cartilage of the lower extremities, when running 4500 km without any day rest for nearly 10 weeks. Is there really a risk for developing an arthrosis when doing this, like some researches and many physicians postulate?

Well, what we find when accompanying 44 ultra-athletes with a modern 1.5Tesla MRI mounted on a custom made 38tonnes truck trailer day by day over 64 days on their way throughout whole Europe is, that the joint cartilage is initially altered by this running burden: It shows signals of cartilage matrix degradation beneath the first 1000 to 1500 km of running. But then the situation changes. When further running occurs, then the cartilage shows the ability to partially regenerate under ongoing running burden. This is a pretty new and astonishing finding, first time measured and observed in human joint in vivo. But knowledge of Scandinavian animal studies show the same behavior in dog cartilage.

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Model Predicts Risk of Blood Clots in Patients With Cast on Leg

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Banne Nemeth, MD and  Suzanne C. Cannegieter MD PhD
Leiden University Medical Center
The Einthoven Laboratory for Experimental Vascular Medicine
Clinical Department of Epidemiology and Orthopedic Surgery

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Nemeth: Clinicians cannot currently accurately predict who will develop venous thrombosis, but it would be very helpful to be able to identify individuals at high risk for venous thrombosis because the condition can be prevented by giving anticoagulants before a clot forms (thromboprophylaxis). The ability to predict venous thrombosis would be particularly useful in patients who have had a lower limb immobilized in a cast after, for example, breaking a bone. These patients have an increased risk of venous thrombosis compared to patients without cast immobilization.

We developed and validated a prediction model to identify patients with plaster cast of the lower extremity who are at high risk to develop venous thrombosis. A clinical risk score named, L-TRIP(cast) score (Leiden Thrombosis Risk Prediction for patients with cast immobilization score), was developed containing 14 clinical risk factors such as age, sex, BMI, use of oral contraceptives and location of plaster cast. Patients that score 9 points or higher are classified as being at high risk for venous thrombosis. Clinicians may decide to prescribe thromboprophylaxis therapy for these patients.

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Calcium Supplements Do Not Prevent Bone Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Mark J Bolland
Associate professor of medicine
Department of Medicine
University of Auckland
Auckland New Zealand

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?
Dr. Bolland: Many guidelines advise older people to take at least 1000-1200 mg/day of calcium to improve bone density and prevent fractures. The average calcium intake in most countries is a lot less than these recommendations, and so many people take calcium supplements to increase their calcium intake. However, recent concerns about the safety of calcium supplements have led experts to recommend increasing calcium intake through food rather than by taking supplements, even though the effect of increasing dietary calcium intake on bone health had not been clearly established. Our study was designed to fill this evidence gap.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Bolland: Firstly, we found that increasing calcium intake either from the diet or by taking calcium supplements led to similar, small, one-off increases in bone density of 1-2%. These increases do not build up over time and are too small to produce significant reductions in the chance of having a fracture.

Secondly, the level of dietary calcium intake is not associated with the risk of having a fracture.

Thirdly, in clinical trials, calcium supplements have only small, inconsistent benefits on preventing fractures, with no effect on fractures seen in the highest quality trials
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About 50% of Meniscus Transplants Fail by Ten Years

Frank R. Noyes, M.D. President and Medical Director, Noyes Knee Institute and the Cincinnati Sports medicine Research and Education Foundation Cincinnati, OhioMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Frank R. Noyes, M.D
.
President and Medical Director, Noyes Knee Institute
and the Cincinnati Sports medicine Research and Education Foundation
Cincinnati, Ohio

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Noyes: Meniscectomy, or removal of the meniscus in the knee, frequently leads to early arthritis – especially in younger active individuals. The meniscus provides a cushion between the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) and aids in keeping the knee stable. There are two menisci in the human knee; one on the inner portion (medial) and one on the outer portion (lateral). The problem is that once a meniscus is removed, there are no options for patients who experience knee pain other than a transplant. The operation uses human cadaver menisci from young donors that are implanted intact into the recipient’s knee. This operation has been performed at our Center for 25 years in patients who are typically under the age of 50 and who have some arthritis in their knee and experience pain with activity. There are few long-term clinical studies on meniscus transplantation that provide results in patients who are at least 10 years postoperative.

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings?

Dr. Noyes: This study reports the long-term results and survival analysis of 40 consecutive meniscus transplants, with a 100% follow-up obtained an average of 11 years postoperatively. The survivor analysis, which included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and x-ray criteria in addition to symptoms and clinical examination, revealed transplant survival rates of 68% at 7 years and 48% at 10 years postoperatively. The results of the symptom and activity level analyses in patients without failure of the transplant showed that only 11% experienced pain with daily activities and 72% were able to participate in low-impact athletics many years after surgery.

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Orthopedic Patients and Their Families At Risk For Opioid Abuse

Hassan R. Mir, MD, MBA Associate professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Vanderbilt Orthopaedic InstituteMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Hassan R. Mir, MD, MBA
Associate professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation
Vanderbilt Orthopaedic Institute and

and

Brent J. Morris, M.D. Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Fellowship Texas Orthopaedic Hospital in affiliation with the University of Texas Houston Health Science Center, Houston, TexasDr. Brent J. Morris, M.D.
Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Fellowship
Texas Orthopaedic Hospital University of Texas Houston Health Science Center,
Houston, Texas

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Mir: The past few decades have seen an alarming rise in opioid use in the United States, and the negative consequences are dramatically increasing. The US represents less than 5% of the world’s population, yet consumes 80% of the global opioid supply. Management of pain is an important part of patient care, however, the increased usage of opioids for the treatment of pain has led to several unanticipated aftereffects for individual patients and for society at large.

Orthopaedic surgeons are the third highest prescribers of opioid prescriptions among physicians in the United States. Orthopaedic patients can experience a tremendous amount of pain with acute injuries and chronic conditions, and the treatment plan may involve opioid prescriptions for relief of discomfort. A significant number of orthopaedic patients and their families are at risk for repercussions from opioid use. We must work together to decrease the use of opioids for musculoskeletal pain.

Clinicians should aim to control pain and improve patient satisfaction while avoiding overprescribing opioids. A comprehensive strategy of risk assessment is needed to identify patients who may be at risk for opioid abuse. Objective measures including patient history, recognition of aberrant behavior, urine drug testing, state prescription drug–monitoring programs, and opioid risk-assessment screening tools may be necessary in select cases.

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When is it Safe to Drive after Orthopedic Surgery?

Dr. Geoffrey S. Marecek, MD Department of Orthopaedic Surgery University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine Los Angeles, CAMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Geoffrey S. Marecek, MD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Los Angeles, CA
MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Marecek: There were several main findings:

1. It is not safe to drive while wearing a sling or splint on the upper extremities
2. It is not safe to drive while wearing a brace, cast, or boot on the lower extremities
3. Braking function does not return to normal for at least 4 weeks after knee arthroscopy, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA), for 9 weeks after ankle fracture repair, and for 6 weeks after weight bearing begins for a fracture (up to 18 weeks for articular fractures).

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