Early Study Demonstrates Airways Can Be Transplanted from Aortic Templates

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Emmanuel Martinod MD PhD
Assistance Publique–Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Seine-Saint-Denis, Hôpital Avicenne, Chirurgie Thoracique et Vasculaire, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR Santé, Médecine et Biologie Humaine, Bobigny,
Université Paris Descartes, Fondation Alain Carpentier, Laboratoire de Recherche Bio-chirurgicale, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou
Paris, France 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this exciting new technology and study? What are the main findings? 

Response: What is the background for this exciting new technology and study? What are the main findings?

Response:  The background is 10 years of research at laboratory followed by 10 years of academic clinical research.

We demonstrated the feasability of airway bioengeenring using stented aortic matrices for complex tracheal or bronchial reconstruction.  Continue reading

Optic Nerve Stroke: Bone Marrow Stem Cells Offer Hope of Vision Improvement

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Steven Levy MD

CEO, MD Stem Cells
Study Director, Stem Cell Treatment Studies

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: MD Stem Cells is the sponsor of the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study II (SCOTS 2) the largest stem cell study currently addressing retinal and optic nerve disease (NCT 03011541). SCOTS uses autologous bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSC) typically provided to the eyes by combining retrobulbar, subtenons and intravenous injections. Many retinal and optic nerve diseases are eligible including Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), Stargardts, Ushers, Glaucoma, Ischemic Optic Neuropathy, Optic Atrophy and others. Statistically significant improvements have been documented in key diseases and positive responses have been noted across most conditions treated. Mechanisms of action may include differentiation of the CD34 cells into neurons, secretion of neurotrophic factors, transfer of mitochondria and release of mRNA. These may benefit existing stressed cells as well as provide replacement of damaged or absent cells.

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Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells May Improve Symptoms in Children with Autism

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael G. Chez, M.D. Director of Pediatric Neurology Sutter Memorial Hospital Director of the Pediatric Epilepsy and Autism Programs Sutter Neuroscience Group 

Dr. Michael Chez

Michael G. Chez, M.D.
Director of Pediatric Neurology Sutter Memorial Hospital
Director of the Pediatric Epilepsy and Autism Programs
Sutter Neuroscience Group 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: The study looked at possible use of autologous cord blood as a source of stem cells in patients with autism. The patients had to have fairly good genetic screening per protocol and had confirmation of autism to participate.

The use of cord blood was a pilot cross over double blind study with hypothesis that a post natal factor or immune dysregulation may add to the autism clinical phenotype.

Cord blood ( the baby’s own from birth) is a safe source of mixed stem cell types and should be safe from rejection or autoimmune reaction in theory.

Infusion /placebo or placebo/infusion was randomized and observed and tested every 3 months with switch to other wing of treatment at 0 and 6 months. Total observation was over 1 year.

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How Do Stem Cells Respond To Diagnostic Radiation Studies?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
http://www.insilico.com/
Andreyan Osipov PhD
Insilico Medicine and
Dmitry Klokov PhD
Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Cells and tissues can be damaged when exposed to ionizing radiation. In case of radiotherapy, it is a desirable effect in tumor cells. In case of occupational, medical and accidental exposures, typically to low-dose radiation, this may pose health risk to normal cells and tissues.

In both cases, short-term assays that quantify damage to DNA and help evaluate long-term outcome are key to treatment/risk management. One such short-term assay is based on quantification of a modified histone protein called gH2AX in exposed cells up to 24 hrs after exposure. This protein marks sites in DNA that have both strands of the DNA helix broken or damaged. This assay is also widely used for various applications, including determination of individual radiosensitivity, tumor response to radiotherapy and biological dosimetry. With the advent of regenerative medicine that is based on stem cell transplantation, the medical and research communities realized that there is a need to understand how stem cells respond to low-dose diagnostic radiation exposures, such as CT scans. Stem cell therapies may have to be combined with diagnostic imaging in recipient patients. The gH2AX assay comes in very handy here, or at least it seemed this way.

We exposed mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human patients to low or intermediate doses of X-rays (80 and 1000 mGy) and followed formation of gH2AX in their nuclei. First we found that residual gH2AX signal in cells exposed to a low dose was higher than in control non-irradiated cells. If the conventional assumptions about this assay that it is a surrogate for long-term detrimental effects was followed it would mean that the low-dose exposed cells were at a high risk of losing their functional properties. So we continued growing these cells for several weeks and assayed gH2AX levels, ability to proliferate and the level of cellular aging. Surprisingly, we found that low-dose irradiated cells did not differ from non-irradiated cells in any of the measured functional end-points. This was in contrast to 1000 mGy irradiated cells that did much worse at those long-term end points.

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Testicular Cancer Stem Cells Highly Sensitive To Chemotherapy, Resulting In High Cure Rates

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

 Credit: Tim Pierpont, Cornell University

A low magnification image of a germ cell tumor, called a teratocarcinoma, from a new mouse model developed to study testicular cancer. A cluster of cancer stem cells, termed embryonal carcinoma, is shown at higher magnification at the bottom.

 

Amy M. Lyndaker, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biology
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Elmira College
This work was completed when I was a Research Associate in the laboratory of
Dr. Robert S. Weiss at:
Department of Biomedical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine
Cornell University Ithaca, NY

 

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There has been this puzzle in the field of cancer biology that testicular cancers, even after they have spread to the brain or the lungs, are often able to be cured with radiation and chemotherapy (think of Lance Armstrong, for instance), whereas the majority of cancers are not curable with similar treatments. We thought that this could be due to the unique properties of the cells from which the cancers are derived; testicular cancers arise from germ cells (which later go on to make sperm), whereas most cancers arise from somatic cells (body cells). We proposed that maybe the germ cells and somatic cells were hard-wired to respond differently to DNA damage, and that because of this, cancers derived from these two distinct types of cells might then respond differently to chemotherapies (which typically kill cancer cells by creating DNA damage).

To test this, we generated a novel genetic mouse model that develops cancers similar to the malignant testicular cancers seen in young men. We then used standard chemotherapies (cisplatin alone, or combined bleomycin/etoposide/cisplatin), and found that treatment with DNA-damaging chemotherapies specifically killed the cancer stem cells within the tumors. Thus, we were able to show that testicular cancers are curable with standard DNA-damaging chemotherapies because their stem cells are highly sensitive to DNA damage. This is in contrast to most cancers, where the cancer stem cells are refractory to treatment and are responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis.

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American CryoStem – CRYO – Allows Individuals to Collect, Freeze and Store Their Stem Cells

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

John Arnone, Chairman and CEO American CryoStem Corporation

John Arnone

John Arnone
Chairman and CEO

American CryoStem Corporation

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this your company American CryoStem?

Response: American CryoStem Corporation (CRYO) was founded in 2008, to allow individuals, researchers and physicians to collect-process-store stem cells derived from adipose tissue (fat) to prepare for their current or future use. Over the years the Company has become a biotechnology pioneer, standardizing adipose tissue derived technologies (Adult Stem Cells) for the fields of Regenerative and Personalized Medicine.

The Company operates a state-of-art, FDA-registered, clinical laboratory in New Jersey and licensed laboratories in Hong Kong, China and Tokyo, Japan, which operate on our proprietary platform, dedicated to the collection, processing, bio-banking, culturing and differentiation of adipose tissue (fat) and adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs)

CRYO maintains a strategic portfolio of intellectual property, 18 patents that surround the Companies proprietary technology which supports a growing pipeline of stem cell applications and biologic products. We are leveraging our proprietary platform and our developed product portfolio to create a domestic and global footprint of licensed laboratory affiliates, physicians networks and research organizations who purchase tissue collection, processing and storage services and consumables from the Company.

CRYO’s laboratory stem cell bank/line products are characterized adult human Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC’s) derived from adipose tissue that work in conjunction with our 13 patented (non-animal) medium lines.

The Company’s R&D efforts are focused on university and private collaborations to discover, develop and commercialize ADSC therapies by utilizing our standardized collection-processing-storage methodology and laboratory products combined with synergistic technologies to create jointly developed regenerative medicine applications and intellectual property.

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Skin-Grafted Stem Cells May Treat Obesity and Diabetes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Xiaoyang Wu PhD Ben May Department for Cancer Research The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Xiaoyang Wu

Dr. Xiaoyang Wu PhD
Ben May Department for Cancer Research
The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We have been working on skin somatic stem cells for many years. As one of the most studies adult stem cell systems, skin stem cells have several unique advantages as the novel vehicle for somatic gene therapy (summarized also in the paper). The system is well established. Human skin transplantation using CEA device developed from skin stem cells have been clinically used for decades for burn wound treatment, and been proven to be safe the effective.

In this study, we developed a skin 3D organoid culture model to induce stratification and maturation of mouse epidermal stem cells in vitro, which allows us to efficiently transfer engineered mouse skin to isogenic host animals. In the proof of concept study, we showed that we can achieve systematic release of GLP1 at therapeutic concentration by engineered skin grafts.

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Preclinical Study Finds Cancer Stem Cell Inhibitor Sensitizes Colon Cancer Cells To Immunotherapy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Yuan Gao

Assistant Investigator at Boston Biomedical

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignant disease and third most frequent cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Standard treatment for unresectable metastatic CRC currently includes first and second line 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy regimens. However, CRC patients often develop chemoresistance. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a revolutionary new treatment for CRC. However, with the exception of a small percentage of CRC patients that display microsatellite instability (MSI), the vast majority of colorectal cancer patients have been found to be resistant to immune checkpoint therapies.

Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a highly malignant tumor cell subpopulation capable of self-renewal, are considered to be fundamentally responsible for malignant growth and tumor recurrence. Emerging evidence indicates that CSCs and cancer stemness pathways, such as STAT3, beta-Catenin, CD44 and Nanog, are involved in the immune evasion of cancers. BBI-608 (napabucasin) is an orally-administered first-in-class cancer stemness inhibitor that works by targeting STAT3. In this study, we investigated the effect of cancer stemness inhibition on sensitizing colorectal cancer to immune checkpoint inhibitors in preclinical models.

In the syngeneic microsatellite stable (MSS) tumor model, CT26, an anti-PD-1 antibody delivered as a monotherapy, produced low level and temporary antitumor activity with rapid development of complete resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment. The anti-PD-1 antibody-treated CT26 tumors exhibited increased p-STAT3 activation and overexpression of a variety of stemness factors, as well as enrichment of sphere-forming stemness-high cancer cells. Napabucasin was able to reduce basal as well as anti-PD1-induced STAT3 activation and other CSC features within CT26 tumors. The combination of a stemness inhibitor – napabucasin – with the anti-PD-1 antibody led to tumor complete response (CR) in all treated CT26 tumors, with 40 percent of the mice remaining tumor-free for 30 days following treatment termination. This combination also had a synergistic effect on the influx of tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cells, which likely contributed to the rapid tumor regression. Finally, mice CR-induced by napabucasin and the anti-PD-1 antibody were able to reject CT26 tumors upon re-challenge, but not the unrelated breast cancer 4T1 tumors.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our data suggest cancer stemness pathways contribute to immunotherapy resistance in MSS CRC, a subtype representing the vast majority of colorectal cancer cases. Furthermore, inhibition of cancer stemness by BBI-608 sensitizes colorectal cancer to immune checkpoint inhibition, producing striking regression in a large proportion of the tumors treated.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: This study provides compelling preclinical evidence to support the investigation of the combination of napabucasin with immune checkpoint inhibitors in CRC. While this study specifically investigated the combination with anti-PD-1, the combination with other immunotherapies could be studied as well.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: AACR 2017 Abstract

Inhibition of cancer stemness sensitizes colorectal cancer to immune checkpoint inhibitors
Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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Human Stem Cells Can Be Used For 3-D Printing of Tissue Stuctures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sang Jin Lee, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine Wake Forest School of Medicine Wake Forest University

Dr. Sang Jin Lee

Sang Jin Lee, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Wake Forest University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: I received my Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea in 2003 and took a postdoctoral fellowship in the Laboratories for Tissue Engineering and Cellular Therapeutics at Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital Boston and the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine where I am currently a faculty member. My research works have focused on development of smart biomaterial systems that support the regenerative medicine strategies and approaches. These biomaterial systems combined with drug/protein delivery system, nano/micro-scaled topographical feature, or hybrid materials that could actively participate in functional tissue regeneration. Recently my research works utilize 3D bioprinting strategy to manufacture complex, multi-cellular living tissue constructs that mimic the structure of native tissues. This can be accomplished by optimizing the formulation of biomaterials to serve as the scaffolding for 3D bioprinting, and by providing the biological environment needed for the successful delivery of cells and biomaterials to discrete locations within the 3D structure.

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RepliCel Developing Autologous Cell Therapies For Skin, Hair and Tendon Regeneration

MedicalResearch.com with:

Lee Buckler, CEO
RepliCel Life Sciences

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this your company, RepliCel.com?

Response: RepliCel Life Sciences is a Canadian regenerative medicine company based in Vancouver, British Columbia that was founded in 2006. The company focuses on the development of cell therapies using a patient’s own cells (autologous cell therapy). It is developing treatments targeted at healing chronic tendon injuries that have failed to heal properly, hair restoration, and the treatment of damaged and aged skin.

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Process Refines Conversion of Skin Fibroblasts into Cardiac Blood Vessels

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jalees Rehman, MD Director of Research, Division of Cardiology Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine Chicago, IL 60612

Dr. Rehman

Jalees Rehman, MD
Director of Research, Division of Cardiology
Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology
University of Illinois at Chicago
College of Medicine
Chicago, IL 60612

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Converting skin fibroblasts into regenerative blood vessel endothelial cells could be a valuable approach to repair diseased blood vessels in patients with cardiovascular disease and also to build new blood vessels in order to supply engineered tissues and organs.

Using skin fibroblasts is very well suited for personalized therapies because they can be obtained from a skin biopsy in an outpatient setting. The biopsied skin sample is used to extract the skin fibroblasts, which are then expanded in cell culture dishes before they are converted to endothelial cells. This allows for the generation of tens or hundreds of millions of cells that will likely be needed for blood vessel repair and regeneration. By converting skin fibroblasts of a patient, we can generate personalized endothelial cells with the same genetic signature as the patient so that they are less likely to be rejected if implanted back into the same patient after the conversion.

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Nasal Spray of Stem Cell Vesicles First Step Toward Treating Brain Diseases

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Darwin J. Prockop, M.D., Ph.D. Professor and Director Institute for Regenerative Medicine Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine Temple, TX

Dr. Prockop

Dr. Darwin J. Prockop, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor and Director
Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine
Temple, TX

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We and many others have been trying for many years to develop therapies with adult stem cells that might rescue the brain from the injuries and disease. Recently many of found that small vesicles secreted by adult stem cells have many of the beneficial effects of the cells themselves. The paper shows that a nasal spray of the vesicles can rescue mice from the long-term effects of severe epilepsy.

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Transplanted Human Embryonic Stem Retinal Pigment Cells Survive 22 months in a Human Recipient

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Won Kyung Song MD.PhD Assistant Professor, Vitreoretinal service, Department of Ophthalmology CHA Bundang Medical Center CHA University Republic of Korea

Dr. Won Kyung Song

Won Kyung Song MD.PhD
Assistant Professor, Vitreoretinal service, Department of Ophthalmology
CHA Bundang Medical Center CHA University
Republic of Korea 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The retina is a light-sensitive neural tissue lining the inner surface of the human eye. The center of this retina is called the “macula”, which is responsible for high quality vision and central visual field. Retinal pigment epithelium is a layer of cells in the outer layer of the retina which has a critical role in maintaining and supporting the retina, especially the macula.

Age-related macular degeneration(AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in Western countries. There are two types of AMD, wet (neovascular or exudative) and dry (atrophic). The retinal pigment epithelium and choroid, are closely related with the pathophysiology of AMD. In dry AMD, age-related degeneration of RPE cells leads to the loss of photoreceptor cells and visual deficit. Currently, some therapies are available for ameliorating the wet AMD. However, there are no effective therapy available for dry AMD.

Previous studies have shown that healthy RPE cells can be implanted to replace unhealthy RPE cells in lesion areas where RPE cells have been lost. Allogenic RPEs resulted in graft rejection and autologous RPEs are difficult to harvest leading to surgery related complications. Now, abundant RPEs with stable genotype and phenotye may be generated from embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we have undergone subretinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell derived RPE cells. (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT 01674829) Among the patients enrolled for

this clinical trial, we noted epiretinal membrane(ERM) with pigmentations over the retina in a proportion of patients as an adverse event. One patient with dry AMD and an epiretinal membrane after the hES-RPE transplantation undergone removal of this ERM. The histologic examination of this ERM with pigmentations showed that the pigmented cells originated from the transplanted hES-RPE cells which survived in the recipient for 22 months without anaplasia.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The main concerns of clinical application of hES derived cells are tumorigenesis and immune rejection.

There are limitations of these trials lacking confirmative measurements of engraftment of the transplanted cells. Because biopsy of the retina results in focal loss of nurosensory retina and labelling the cells may cause additional clinical harm.

This is the first report showing that hES derived cells has survived upto 22 months in human organ without anaplasia and may form an ERM.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Objective measurement of engraftment is necessary, together with advancement of an objective visual function measurements.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: The case reported in this journal is a finding from a patient enrolled in the clinical trial sponsored by CHAbiotech.Co,Ltd.

HI12C1794(A121941)

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Shim SH, Kim G, Lee DR, Lee JE, Kwon HJ, Song WK. Survival of Transplanted Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in a Human Recipient for 22 Months. JAMA Ophthalmol. Published online February 09, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2016.5824

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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Smaller and More Stable Than Stem Cells, Exosomes Can Preserve Retinal Cell Function

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ben Mead, BSc, MRes, PhD Section of Retinal Ganglion Cell Biology Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland 20892

Dr. Ben Mead

Ben Mead, BSc, MRes, PhD
Section of Retinal Ganglion Cell Biology
Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology
National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Maryland 20892

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in the back of the eye transmit visual information to the brain, via long thread-like extensions called axons, which make up the optic nerve. Loss of these cells is the leading cause of irreversible blindness and can occur through trauma or degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma or optic neuritis. While no treatment yet exists to directly protect RGC from death, mesenchymal stem cells, a type of stem cell isolated from adult bone marrow, have shown therapeutic efficacy in various animal models and are currently undergoing clinical trials.

In this study, we aimed to isolate exosomes, which are small, membrane-enclosed vesicles secreted by bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and that we believe are associated with the therapeutic effect of BMSCs. Injecting these exosomes into the eyes of animals following an optic nerve injury, was associated with significant neuroprotection of RGC, as well as preservation of RGC function. The protective effects of exosomes appeared to be through their delivery of microRNA, molecules that interfere with or silence gene expression.

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Reduced Stem Cells Link Congenital Heart Disease To Impaired Brain Growth

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Childrens National Research Team

Children’s National Research Team

Paul D. Morton, Ph.D.
Research PostDoc and lead study author of “Abnormal Neurogenesis and Cortical Growth in Congenital Heart Disease.”
Children’s National Health System Washington, DC

Nobuyuki Ishibashi, M.D.
Director of the Cardiac Surgery Research Laboratory at Children’s National Health System and co-senior study author.

Vittorio Gallo, Ph.D.
Director of the Center for Neuroscience Research at Children’s National Health System and co-senior study author.

 

 

Richard A. Jonas, M.D.
Chief of the Division of Cardiac Surgery at Children’s National Health System and co-senior study author.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the leading birth defect in the United States and often results in an array of long-term neurological deficits including motor, cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. It has become increasingly clear that children with CHD often have underdeveloped brains. In many cases of complex CHD, blood flow to the brain is both reduced and less oxygenated, which has been associated with developmental abnormalities and delay. The cellular mechanisms underlying the impact of CHD on brain development remain largely unknown. We developed a preclinical chronic hypoxia model to define these mechanisms.

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Healthy Stem Cells Need Just Right Telomere Length

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Professor Jan Karlseder Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory Donald and Darlene Shiley Chair Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Prof. Jan Karlseder

Professor Jan Karlseder
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory
Donald and Darlene Shiley Chair
Salk Institute for Biological Studies

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? 

Response: Telomeres are repetitive stretches of DNA at the ends of each chromosome whose length can be increased by an enzyme called telomerase. Our cellular machinery results in a little bit of the telomere becoming lopped off each time cells replicate their DNA and divide. As telomeres shorten over time, the chromosomes themselves become vulnerable to damage. Eventually the cells die. The exception is stem cells, which use telomerase to rebuild their telomeres, allowing them to retain their ability to divide, and to develop (“differentiate”) into virtually any cell type for the specific tissue or organ, be it skin, heart, liver or muscle—a quality known as pluripotency. These qualities make stem cells promising tools for regenerative therapies to combat age-related cellular damage and disease.

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Kidney Organoids Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Model Polycystic Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ryuji Morizane M.D. Ph.D. Associate Biologist, Renal Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Affiliated Faculty, Harvard Stem Cell Institute Instructor, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Ryuji Morizane

Dr. Ryuji Morizane MD, PhD
Associate Biologist, Renal Division
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Affiliated Faculty, Harvard Stem Cell Institute
Instructor, Harvard Medical School

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) accounts for 10% of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), and there is currently no curable treatment available for patients with PKD.

The adult onset form of PKD, the most common type of PKD, takes 30 years to form cysts in humans; therefore, it is difficult to study mechanisms of PKD to find novel therapeutics for patients.

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Breast Cancer Cells Become Chemotherapy Resistant By Eating Surrounding Stem Cells

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Thomas Bartosh Jr, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Medical Physiology Texas A&M Health Science Center

Dr. Thomas Bartosh Jr,

Thomas Bartosh Jr, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor Medical Physiology
Texas A&M Health Science Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: One mysterious and devastating aspect of breast cancer is that it can reemerge abruptly, often as metastatic disease, in patients many years after an apparent eradication of the primary tumor. The sudden reappearance of cancer has been termed relapse and is thought to occur because a minimal number of resilient tumor cells are able to evade frontline therapies and linger in an undetectable/dormant state somewhere in the body for an unpredictable amount of time. Then, for reasons that remain unclear, these same dormant cells awaken and rapidly grow, and produce almost invariably fatal cancerous lesions. The therapeutic challenges of tumor dormancy and need to decode the underlying mechanisms involved are apparent.

Cancer cell behavior is strongly influenced by various non-malignant cell types that are found within the tumor mass itself and that help make up the tumor microenvironment (TME). In particular, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), which are actively recruited into the tumor stroma, directly interact with carcinoma cells and significantly impact cancer progression, although the role of MSCs in tumor dormancy remains ill-defined.

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Switch Stimulating New Insulin-Producing Cells Could Lead To Cure For Type I Diabetes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Fred Levine MD PhD Professor & Director Sanford Children's Health Research Center Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute La Jolla, CA

Dr. Fred Levine

Dr. Fred Levine MD PhD
Professor & Director
Sanford Children’s Health Research Center
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
La Jolla, CA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study is the latest in a series that began in 2010 when we published that the combination of severe pancreatitis and ablation of preexisting pancreatic beta-cells led to the formation of new beta-cells by direct conversion of alpha-cells, which are the neighboring cells in the islets of Langerhans producing glucagon, which like insulin is also involved in glucose homeostasis.

The phenomenon of generating new beta-cells by islet cell transdifferentiation went against the conventional wisdom in the field, which is that most beta-cell neogenesis in adults occurs by differentiation from cells in the pancreatic ducts, similar to what happens during embryogenesis. Since then, we have shown that beta-cell neogenesis by islet cell transdifferentiation appears to occur in murine and human type I diabetes, making it highly translationally relevant.

Understanding the mechanism by which new beta-cells are formed from alpha-cells is required for eventual clinical translation. The current study describes that mechanism, which involves the activation of an atypical G protein coupled receptor called Protease Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2). Unlike most other GPCRs, it is activated by extracellular proteases such as are found in the exocrine pancreas or following tissue damage. PAR2 activation by an injectable peptide agonist was both necessary and sufficient to induce beta-cell neogenesis when preexisting beta-cells are absent, as occurs in type I diabetes.

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Stem Cells From Nose Used To Repair Knee Cartilage

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Professor Ivan Martin, PhD Department of Surgery and Department of Biomedicine University Hospital Basel University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

Prof. Ivan Martin

Professor Ivan Martin, PhD
Department of Surgery and Department of Biomedicine
University Hospital Basel
University of Basel
Basel, Switzerland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study and new use of autologous nasal chondrocytes?

Response: We previously demonstrated that nasal chondrocytes, harvested from the nasal septum, have a larger and more reproducible capacity to form new cartilage than articular chondrocytes, harvested from the knee joint. We further established that the cartilage tissue generated by nasal chondrocytes can respond to physical forces (mechanical loads) similar to articular cartilage and has the ‘plasticity’ to adapt to a joint environment, since it efficiently integrated with surrounding articular cartilage when implanted in goat joints. This was the rationale for using nasal chondrocytes for articular cartilage repair.

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Electronic cigarettes increase endothelial progenitor cells in the blood of healthy volunteers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lukasz Antoniewicz MD PhD candidate Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences Danderyd University Hospital Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. Lukasz Antoniewicz

Lukasz Antoniewicz MD, PhD candidate
Karolinska Institutet
Department of Clinical Sciences
Danderyd University Hospital
Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Electronic cigarette sales increase exponentially on a global scale without knowledge about possible negative effects on human health. We performed an exposure study in young healthy volunteers and analyzed blood samples for endothelial progenitor cells and microvesicles. Increase in those markers may reflect vascular injury, inflammation and platelet activation.

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Stem Cells Drive Vascular Calcification in Arteriosclerosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rafael Kramann, MD, FASN
RWTH Aachen University
Division of Nephrology and Clinical Immunology
Pauwelsstr 30
52074 Aachen, Germany

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Vascular calcification contributes centrally to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease.

Vascular calcification is of major clinical importance as it predicts cardiovascular events, affects plaque stability contributing to stroke and myocardial infarction and also contributes to chronic heart failure by stiffening of the arterial wall. However, the cellular origin of vascular calcification is incompletely understood. While it is known that resident vascular smooth muscle cells and circulating macrophages are involved the contribution of adventitial cells is controversial and partly unknown.

Our data indicates that adventitial progenitor cells marked by expression of Gli1 are key drivers of vascular calcification in athero- and arteriosclerosis. Genetic ablation of this cell population completely abolished vascular calcification in a mouse model of high lipid load and chronic kidney disease. Identification of this progenitor population might be the first step towards a cell-specific targeted therapy of vascular calcification.

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Cord Blood Transplant in Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Filippo Milano, MD, PhD Assistant Member, Clinical Research Division Associate Director Cord Blood Transplantation Cord Blood Program Assistant Professor, University of Washington Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Dr. Filippo Milano

Dr. Filippo Milano, MD, PhD
Assistant Member, Clinical Research Division
Associate Director Cord Blood Transplantation
Cord Blood Program
Assistant Professor, University of Washington
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: When first introduced, cord blood (CB) graft was used only as a last resort when no suitable conventional donor could be identified, largely due to the limiting cell doses available in a cord blood graft. A CB graft, however, is attractive due to the increased level of HLA disparity that can be tolerated, without increased risk of graft versus host disease, allowing nearly all patients to find such a donor.

The main intent of the study was to evaluate whether or not, at our Institution, cord blood SHOULD STILL BE considered only AS an alternative DONOR or IF instead outcomes were comparable to those obtained with more “conventional” types of transplants from matched and mismatched unrelated donors.

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Stem Cells May Be Stimulated in Women With Chest Pain But Normal Coronary Arteries

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Arshed A. Quyyumi MD; FRCP

Dr. Arshed Auyyumi

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Arshed A. Quyyumi MD; FRCP
Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Emory University School of Medicine
Co-Director, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute
Atlanta GA 30322

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Circulating progenitor or stem cells were discovered in adults 15 years ago. We now know that they may be stimulated by injury or ischemia, and they go down in number and function with aging, particularly when aging is associated with risk factors.

Women with chest pain despite normal coronary arteries are thought to have ischemia because of microvascular dysfunction. We found that these women, with the worst microvascular function (measured as coronary flow reserve), had higher levels of circulating stem or progenitor cells. This implies that the mild ischemia they are having during their normal daily life, leads to stimulation of their stem cells. Also, the vascular abnormality may be a stimulus for repair.

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Cardioprotective Effect of Metformin in Diabetes Determined

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jolanta U Weaver, FRCP MRCS PhD CTLHE

Dr. Jolanta Weaver

Jolanta U Weaver, FRCP MRCS PhD CTLHE
Senior Lecturer in Diabetes Medicine
Honorary Consultant Diabetologist
Newcastle

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Vascular stem cells, which are associated with an improvement of heart disease, are improved in type 1 diabetes by repurposing metformin, known to reduce heart disease in type 2 diabetes.

We treated patients with type 1 diabetes with metformin for 8 weeks. The metformin dose varied between 500 mg a day to 2000 mg a day, depending on what patients were happy to take. Subjects were requested to keep diabetic control unchanged to study the direct effect of metformin on heart disease. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (vascular stem cells) count, Hill’s colonies and pro angiogenic cells function (in test tube) improved in comparison to patients, who did not take metformin but remained on standard therapy.

Endothelial cells associated with vascular damage, on the other hand, were reduced following metformin therapy confirming improved vascular health. The glycaemic control remained unchanged (as planned at the onset of the study) to allow us to examine the effect of metformin ALONE on vascular health. Patients did not suffer any serious side effects.

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