Many Patients Taking Warfarin Plus Aspirin Without Clear Indication

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Geoffrey Barnes, MD, MScAssistant ProfessorVascular and Cardiovascular MedicineUniversity of Michigan

Dr. Barnes

Geoffrey Barnes, MD, MSc
Assistant Professor
Vascular and Cardiovascular Medicine
University of Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Both aspirin and warfarin are commonly used medications meant to prevent thrombotic complications, but might increase rates of bleeding complications.

We used a multi-center anticoagulation collaborative to explore how often patients being treated with warfarin were also taking aspirin but without a clear indication. We found that more than one-third (37.5%) of warfarin-treated patients without a clear reason for aspirin therapy were receiving aspirin. And these patients on both warfarin and aspirin experienced higher rates of bleeding and emergency department visits for bleeding than the patients taking warfarin alone. There were no differences in the rate of thrombotic events between the patients taking warfarin alone or those taking warfarin plus aspirin.  Continue reading

Larger Number of Benzodiazepine Pills in Initial Prescription Associated With Long Term Use

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lauren B. Gerlach, D.O. Clinical Lecturer Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan

Dr. Gerlach

Lauren B. Gerlach, D.O.
Clinical Lecturer
Department of Psychiatry
University of Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? 

Response: In this study we used data from the Supporting Seniors Receiving Treatment and Intervention or SUSTAIN program. The program provides a supplement to a Pennsylvania medication coverage program for low-income older adults. It provides behavioral health and case management services by phone across the state. This included detailed interviews to screen for mental health issues including anxiety, depression, sleep issues, and pain, as well as analysis of prescription records and other clinical data.

Among older adults prescribed a new benzodiazepine prescription by a non-psychiatric provider, we determined how many then went on to long-term use of the medication and what patient and clinical characteristics predicted long-term use over the following year.

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