Patients With Multiple Chronic Diseases Incur High Out-of-Pocket Expenses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Grace Sum Chi-En National University of Singapore

Dr Grace Sum    Chi-En

Dr Grace Sum Chi-En
National University of Singapore

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Chronic diseases are conditions that are not infectious and are usually long-term, such as diabetes, hypertension, cancer, chronic lung disease, asthma, arthritis, stroke, obesity, and depression. They are also known as non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Multimorbidity, is a term we use in our field, to mean the presence of two or more NCDs. Multimorbidity is a costly and complex challenge for health systems globally. With the ageing population, more people in the world will suffer from multiple chronic diseases.

Patients with multimorbidity tend to need many medicines, and this incurs high levels of out-of-pocket expenditures, simply known as cost not covered by insurance. Even the United Nations and World Health organisation are recognising NCDs as being an important issue.

Governments will meet in New York for the United Nations 3rd high-level meeting on chronic diseases in 2018. Global leaders need to work towards reducing the burden of having multiple chronic conditions and providing financial protection to those suffering multimorbidity.

Our research aimed to conduct a high-quality systematic review on multimorbidity and out-of-pocket expenditure on medicines.  Continue reading

ACA Pay-For-Performance Programs Not Living Up To Expectations

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Igna Bonfrer PhD Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health 

Dr. Bonfrer

Dr. Igna Bonfrer PhD
Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: One of the two main elements of the Affordable Care Act, generally known as Obama Care, is the implementation of value based payments through so called “pay-for-performance” initiatives. The aim of pay-for-performance (P4P) is to reward health care providers for high-quality care and to penalize them for low-quality care.

We studied the effects of the P4P program in US hospitals and found that the impact of the program as currently implemented has been limited.

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Medicaid Work Requirements May Have Unintended Consequences on Costs and Enrollees

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Renuka Tipirneni, MD, MSc Clinical Lecturer in Internal Medicine University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, and Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Tipirneni

Renuka Tipirneni, MD, MSc
Clinical Lecturer in Internal Medicine
University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, and
Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation
Ann Arbor, MI

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Several states have submitted proposals to require Medicaid expansion enrollees to work, actively seek work or volunteer, or risk losing Medicaid coverage. The current federal administration has signaled a willingness to approve the waivers states need to enact such requirements.

In our survey of over 4000 Medicaid expansion enrollees in Michigan, we found that nearly half of enrollees have jobs, another 11 percent can’t work, likely due to serious physical or mental health conditions, and another 27% are out of work but also are much more likely to be in poor health.

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LA’s Housing Program Reduced Overall Costs For Homeless Services

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Homeless” by Sonny Abesamis is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Sarah Hunter, PhD
Senior Behavioral Scientist, RAND Corporation
Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Santa Monica, CA 90401-3028

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In 2014, RAND was contracted by Brilliant Corners in collaboration with the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to conduct an evaluation of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services’ Housing for Health (HFH) program.  The HFH program began in 2012 with the goal of providing permanent supportive housing for frequent utilizers of county health services who were experiencing homelessness.  Continue reading

Price Transparency Not Keeping Up With High-Deductible Health Care Plans

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Health Insurance” by Pictures of Money is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Allison Kratka
MD Candidate 2018
Duke University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: As there are increasing numbers of high-deductible plans and those with high rates of co-insurance, patients are increasingly expected to help contain the cost of their health care by being savvy health care consumers. We set out to determine how easy or hard it is to find healthcare prices online.

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How Much Non-Invasive Testing Is Necessary In ER To Rule Out Heart Attack?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

David L. Brown, MD, FACC Professor of Medicine Cardiovascular Division Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, MO 63110

Dr. Brown

David L. Brown, MD, FACC
Professor of Medicine
Cardiovascular Division
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO 63110

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Approximately 10 million patients present to emergency rooms in the US annually for evaluation of acute chest pain.

The goal of that evaluation is to rule out the diagnosis of an acute heart attack. Imaging with coronary CT angiography and stress testing are not part of the diagnostic algorithm for acute heart attack.  Nevertheless many chest pain patients undergo some form of noninvasive cardiac testing in the ER. We found that CCTA or stress testing adding nothing to the care of chest pain patients beyond what is achieved by a history, physical examination, ECG and troponin test.

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HIV PreExposure Prophylaxis -PrEP- For MSM Found To Be Effective and Cost Saving

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Valentina Cambiano PhD Institute for Global Health University College London London UK

Dr. Cambiano

Dr Valentina Cambiano PhD
Institute for Global Health
University College London
London UK

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) which involves the use of drugs, which are used to treat HIV, in people without HIV to prevent them from getting is a critical new advance in HIV prevention. It has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection by 86% and the benefits heavily out-weigh any concerns. However, introducing this intervention has a cost.

When we started working on this study the National Health Services was discussing whether to introduce PrEP and if so for which populations. Unfortunately, at the moment NHS England is not providing Pre-exposure prophylaxis. However, a large study, the PrEP impact trial, funded by the NHS, has just started and this will provide PrEP to 10,000 people.

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Maryland All-Payer Model Produced Outpatient and ER Medicare Savings

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Susan G. Haber, Sc.D.

Director, Health Coverage for Low-Income and Uninsured Populations
RTI International
Waltham, MA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In 2014, the state of Maryland and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began testing an alternative payment structure for inpatient and outpatient hospital services. Known as the All-Payer Model, the new system limits hospitals’ revenues from Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers to a global budget for the year. This builds on Maryland’s hospital rate-setting system that had operated since the 1970s, where all payers pay the same rates. CMS wanted to test whether global budgets could help Maryland limit cost growth and reduce avoidable hospital use. The goal of the model is to limit per capita total hospital cost growth for both Medicare and all payers and to generate $330 million in Medicare savings over 5 years.

RTI researchers studied the impact of hospital global budgets on Medicare beneficiary expenditures and utilization, using Medicare claims data to compare changes in Maryland before and after adoption of global budgets with changes in matched comparison areas outside of the state. Our report found Maryland has reduced total Medicare expenditures by approximately $293 million and total hospital expenditures by about $200 million in its first two years of operation. The reduction in overall expenditures indicates that “squeezing the balloon” on hospital expenditures did not simply produce a cost-shift to other health care sectors. Hospital expenditure savings for Medicare were achieved by reducing expenditures for outpatient emergency department and other hospital outpatient department services. Although inpatient admissions declined, there were no savings in Medicare expenditures for inpatient hospital services because the payment per admission increased. Maryland hospitals reduced avoidable utilization, including admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions, and readmissions and emergency department visits following hospital discharge. Despite the success in reducing expenditures, interviews with senior leaders at Maryland hospitals and focus group discussions with physicians and nurses suggest that many hospitals had not yet made fundamental changes in how they operate or developed partnerships with community physicians to divert care from the hospital, although there was variation in how hospitals responded.

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Low-Cost, High-Volume Services Add Billions To US Health Care Tab

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

John N. Mafi MPH Assistant Professor of Medicine David Geffen School of Medicine University of California, Los Angeles Natural scientist in Health Policy RAND Corporation Santa Monica, California

Dr. Mafi

John N. Mafi MD MPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles
Natural scientist in Health Policy
RAND Corporation
Santa Monica, California

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Of the 3 trillion dollars the U.S. spends annually on health care, an estimated 10-30% consists of “low-value care”, or patient care that provides no net benefit in specific clinical scenarios (think antibiotics given for the common cold virus). Determining where and why this waste occurs is critical to efforts to safely reducing healthcare spending. Little is known, however, about the distribution of costs among such “low-value” services. In this context, we used the Virginia All Payer Claims Database in order to assess the quantity and total costs of 44 low-value services in 2014 among 5.5 million beneficiaries.

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Financial Incentives to Physicians Did Not Increase Hospital Discharge Follow-Up Visits

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Lauren Lapointe-Shaw, MD Physician at University Health Network Department of Medicine University of Toronto 

Dr. Lapointe-Shaw

Dr. Lauren Lapointe-Shaw, MD
Physician at University Health Network
Department of Medicine
University of Toronto 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Readmissions after hospital discharge are common and costly. We would like to reduce these as much as possible. Early physician follow-up post hospital discharge is one possible strategy to reduce readmissions. To this end, incentives to outpatient physicians for early follow-up have been introduced in the U.S. and Canada. We studied the effect of such an incentive, introduced to Ontario, Canada, in 2006.

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Participation in SNAP Food Assistance Linked To Lower Health Care Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Seth A. Berkowitz, MD, MPH Division of General Internal Medicine Diabetes Population Health Unit Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Dr. Berkowitz

Seth A. Berkowitz, MD, MPH
Division of General Internal Medicine
Diabetes Population Health Unit
Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There is ever growing pressure to contain healthcare costs in the US. Increasingly, attention is turning to programs that address social determinants of health–that is, those factors which affect health but lie outside the realm of clinical medicine.

Prior research has highlighted food insecurity as having a clear association with poor health and higher healthcare costs. SNAP is the nation’s largest program to combat food insecurity. However, we did not know whether SNAP participation would be associated with any difference in healthcare costs, compared with eligible non-participants.

This study found that participating in SNAP was associated with approximately $1400 lower healthcare expenditures per year in low-income adults.

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Global Budget in Maryland Saved Medicare Money By Limiting Hospital Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
RTI
Susan G. Haber, Sc.D. 
Director, Health Coverage for Low-Income and Uninsured Populations
RTI International
Waltham, MA 02452-8413

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In 2014, the state of Maryland and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began testing an alternative payment structure for inpatient and outpatient hospital services. Known as the All-Payer Model, the new system limits hospitals’ revenues from Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers to a global budget for the year. This builds on Maryland’s hospital rate-setting system that had operated since the 1970s, where all payers pay the same rates. CMS wanted to test whether global budgets could help Maryland limit cost growth and reduce avoidable hospital use. The goal of the model is to limit per capita total hospital cost growth for both Medicare and all payers and to generate $330 million in Medicare savings over 5 years.

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Morbidity and Financial Costs of Atrial Fibrillation High and Likely to Grow

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sandra L. Jackson, PhD National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chamblee GA

Dr. Sandra  Jackson

Sandra L. Jackson, PhD
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Chamblee GA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: People who have atrial fibrillation are at increased risk for having a heart attack or stroke. While we know that the percentage of the population with atrial fibrillation is increasing in the US, there is no national surveillance system to track the burden of emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths related to atrial fibrillation across all ages and health insurance provider types. This study combined data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and the National Vital Statistics System to provide national estimates for atrial fibrillation-related healthcare service use and deaths from 2006-2014.

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Oropharyngeal Cancer Rising In Incidence and Costs to Over $140,000

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

David R. Lairson, PhD Professor of Health Economics Division of Management Policy and Community Health Co-Director, Center for Health Services Research School of Public Health The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth)

Dr. Lairson

David R. Lairson, PhD
Professor of health economics
Department of Management, Policy, and Community Health
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The study of oropharyngeal cancer treatment cost was initiated by the Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Department at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center as part of a larger study of the economic and health consequences of human papillomavirus (HPV) related conditions in Texas.  State specific information is required for policy-makers to consider future investments in cancer prevention based on HPV immunization and cancer screening.  The cost estimates at $140,000 per case for the first two years of treatment are substantially higher than previous estimates.  They indicate the potential savings associated with cancer prevention and partially justify increased investment in immunization efforts.

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Even After Rebates, Use of PCSK9 Inhibitor Would Still Cost Over $5 Million To Prevent One Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Inmaculada Hernandez, PharmD, PhD Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Therapeutics University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Pittsburgh, PA 1526

Dr. Hernandez

Inmaculada Hernandez, PharmD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Therapeutics
University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy
Pittsburgh, PA 1526

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: A few months ago, the results of the FOURIER trial were published. This trial was the first one to evaluate the efficacy of PCSK9 inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular events, since the approval of these agents was based on trials that evaluated their efficacy in reducing levels of LDL-C. The results of the FOURIER trial did not meet the expectations generated by prior studies that had simulated how much the risk of cardiovascular events should decrease based on the observed reduction in LDL-C levels. A few hours after the publication of the results of the FOURIER trial, Amgen (evolocumab´s manufacturer) announced that it would be willing to engage in contracts where the cost of evolocumab would be refunded for those patients who suffer a heart attack or a stroke while using the drug.

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Higher Cost Sharing For Mental Health Services Could Increase Downstream Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Bastian Ravesteijn PhD Department of Health Care Policy Harvard Medical School

Dr. Ravesteijn

Bastian Ravesteijn PhD
Department of Health Care Policy
Harvard Medical School 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We find that higher out-of-pocket costs for mental health care could have the unintended consequence of increasing the use of acute and involuntary mental health care among those suffering from the most debilitating disorders. Continue reading

EKGs of Low Risk Patients Remain Common and Associated With More Cardiac Testing

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sacha Bhatia, MD, MBA, FRCPC
Scientist, Women’s College Research Institute
Director, Women’s College Hospital Institute for Health System Solutions and Virtual Care
Cardiologist, Women’s College Hospital and University Health Network
Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The USPSTF recommends against screening with resting electrocardiography (ECG) for the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in asymptomatic adults at low risk for CHD events. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of the frequency of resting ECGs in low risk patients within 30 days of an annual health exam. We found that 21.5% of low risk patients in Ontario, Canada had a ECG, with significant variation among primary care physicians (1.8% to 76.1%). Moreover, low risk patients who had a ECG were five times more likely to receive another cardiac test or cardiology consultation than those that did not receive an ECG. At one year the rate of mortality, cardiac hospitalizations and revascularization was <0.5% in each group.

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Optimization of Medication Use Critical to Success of ACOs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Kimberly Westrich, MA
Vice President, Health Services Research, National Pharmaceutical Council, and
Kristina Lunner
Principal, Leavitt Partners

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: With the advent of accountable care organizations (ACOs) following passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, it became important to understand how success in an ACO world is different from success in a capitated environment, where the focus is only on managing costs. In an ACO, providers are responsible for the quality of care they provide for a defined population in addition to having at least some financial responsibility. We wanted to explore how an ACO can succeed in this environment of dual responsibility for costs and quality, and more specifically, how pharmaceuticals fit into this success.

To address these questions, the National Pharmaceutical Council worked with the American Medical Group Association (AMGA), Premier, Inc., and a group of seven leading ACOs to develop a conceptual framework for considering the role of pharmaceuticals in ACOs. This framework shows how optimizing medication use in a value-based healthcare environment, such as an ACO, can help the organization achieve its cost and quality benchmarks.

We evaluated ACO readiness to optimize medication use in 2014 and again with our most recent study, published in June 2017 online ahead of print in the Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy. For our 2017 study, we worked with Leavitt Partners to survey and interview ACOs to understand how they optimize medication use, determine if there is an association between efforts to optimize medication use and achievement on financial and quality metrics, ascertain organizational factors that correlate with optimized medication use, and identify barriers to optimized medication use.
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Head-to-Head Study Compares All Costs Associated With New Anticoagulants in Non-Valvular AFib

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sabine Luik, M.D.</strong> Senior vice president, Medicine & Regulatory Affairs Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Sabine Luik

Sabine Luik, M.D.
Senior vice president, Medicine & Regulatory Affairs
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study is the first real-world, matched head-to-head study comparing all cause healthcare costs and healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) among novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs).

The study analyzed claims data from 70,898 newly-diagnosed NVAF patients who were newly treated with Pradaxa, rivaroxaban or apixaban.

The analysis found that Pradaxa was associated with lower all-cause costs and HCRU compared to rivaroxaban. Compared to apixaban, Pradaxa was associated with similar all-cause costs and hospitalizations, but higher all-cause outpatient and pharmacy HCRU.

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Costs of Bike Accidents Skyrocket

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Tom Gaither, MD, MAS Department of Urology San Francisco, CA 94143

Dr. Gaither

Tom Gaither, MD, MAS
Department of Urology
San Francisco, CA 94143

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Admission to the hospital because of bicycle crashes has increased over the past 15 years. We aimed to estimate the costs due to these bicycle crashes.

From 1999 to 2013, the total costs due to these injuries (direct medical costs, work loss costs, and pain and suffering) were $209 billion dollars. Costs due to non-fatal injuries have increased by 137% over the study period. In 2013, the total direct and indirect costs were $24 billion dollars, which is approximately doubling the costs due to occupational injuries in the US.

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Heart Disease, Trauma and Diabetes Incur Highest Cost Per Person Medical Expenses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Anita Soni, PhD, MBA Survey Analyst/Statistician Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Dr. Anita Soni

Anita Soni, PhD, MBA
Survey Analyst/Statistician
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This statistical brief uses the data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), which collects a broad range of data related to the health care of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population including health insurance coverage, the number and types of health care events and the sources of payment and payment amounts for those events. The survey also gathers information on which medical conditions are associated with the reported health care events. Condition-specific health care expenditure information derived from MEPS data is useful for policy makers in determining where to focus health policies to improve the quality and efficiency of the health care system from the perspective of disease treatment and management.

This Statistical Brief presents data regarding medical expenditures for nine conditions for which an estimated 10 percent or more of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population (individuals age 18 and older) received health care in 2013.

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Fixed-Dose Blood Pressure Medications Save Money In The Long Run

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kalyani B. Sonawane, PhD Assistant Professor/ PhD Program Director Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy College of Public Health and Health Professions University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32610

Dr. Sonawane

Kalyani B. Sonawane, PhD
Assistant Professor/ PhD Program Director
Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy
College of Public Health and Health Professions
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Almost one-third of Americans have high blood pressure. Of those patients who are prescribed medication to control their blood pressure, about 30 percent have problems with side effects and nearly 50 percent will not have their blood pressure controlled within the first year of taking medication. In such scenarios, physicians have the option to either add a medication, such as fixed-dose combination, to the patient’s regimen or gradually increase a patient’s dose of their current drug to achieve blood pressure control; and gradually decrease the dose of their current drug or switch to a different drug to resolve side effects. Using healthcare claims data, we compared the economic impact of these alternative treatment modification strategies.

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Worsening Kidney Function Associated With Significantly Higher Medical Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Shaum Kabadi</strong> HEOR Director at AstraZeneca

Shaum Kabadi

Shaum Kabadi
HEOR Director at AstraZeneca

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: More than 20 million adults – roughly 1 in 10 adults – in the US are estimated to have chronic kidney disease (CKD), and this population is expected to grow as the US population ages. Patients with CKD are at high risk for progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a condition requiring dialysis or kidney transplantation to maintain patients’ long-term survival. The cost of treating ESRD patients was over $40 billion in public and private funds in 2009. Prior research shows per-person annual Medicare expenses attributable to CKD were $1,700 for Stage 2, $3,500 for Stage 3, and $12,700 for Stage 4. Additional research is required to understand the economic burden of CKD by stage in a contemporary cohort of commercially insured patients with non-dialysis-dependent (NDD)-CKD.

This retrospective cohort study utilized data from the HealthCore Integrated Research Environment, which contained medical and pharmacy administrative claims integrated with laboratory result values from 14 regionally dispersed Anthem health plans in the US.

Of 16,030 patients identified with CKD, the mean (SD) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (all in mL/min/1.73 m2) in 2014 was 44.3 (±18.7), and the breakdown by eGFR levels was: Stage 1 (≥90) 3%, Stage 2 (60–89) 13%, Stage 3a (45–59) 27%, Stage 3b (30–44) 35%, Stage 4 (15–29) 19%, and Stage 5 (<15) 3%. Mean age across all stages was 67.4 years, and 47% were women. Hospitalization rate (%) and number of outpatient encounters (visits per patient per year) by stage were: Stage 1 (11.6%, 19.8), Stage 2 (14.9%, 22.5), Stage 3a (16.2%, 23.6), Stage 3b (23.7%, 29.5), Stage 4 (30.7%, 36.3), and Stage 5 (30.8%, 61.7) (p-trend).

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Younger Breast Cancer Patients Have More Later-Stage Disease and Higher Financial Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Benjamin Allaire MS RTI International Research Triangle Park Durham, NC, 27709

Benjamin Allaire

Benjamin Allaire MS
RTI International
Research Triangle Park
Durham, NC, 27709

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: More than 22,000 women younger than 45 years of age were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. Although less than 10 percent of all breast cancers are diagnosed among women younger than age 45, the types of breast cancer these younger women face are typically more aggressive, are diagnosed at more advanced stages, and result in poorer survival compared to breast cancer in older women. Younger women may also require more intense treatment, exhibit cancers that are less responsive to treatment, and have distinct and more prevalent side effects from treatment than older women. These side effects can include poorer quality of life, fertility problems, and depression.

As a result, breast cancer treatment for younger women is expensive, making them vulnerable to financial hardship. Recent research has shown that 31.8 percent of cancer survivors are likely to have cancer treatment-induced financial troubles, with higher rates among younger cancer patients. These financial difficulties cause some survivors to forego or delay necessary medical treatments.

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Family and Individuals Directly Pay Less Than 14% of US Health Care Expenditures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Marie Stagnitti, M.P.A.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component Project Officer/Senior Survey Statistician

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) – Household Component (HC) which began in 1996 and is administered annually collects data from a sample of families and individuals in selected communities across the United States, and is drawn from a nationally representative subsample of households that participated in the prior year’s National Health Interview Survey (conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics).

During the household interviews, MEPS collects detailed information for each person in the household on the following: demographic characteristics, health conditions, health status, use of medical services, charges and source of payments, access to care, satisfaction with care, health insurance coverage, income, and employment.

The panel design of the survey, which features several rounds of interviews covering two full calendar years, makes it possible to determine how changes in respondents’ health status, income, employment, eligibility for public and private insurance coverage, use of services, and payment for care are related. Continue reading