Any Job is Not Necessarily Better Than NO Job

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Professor Tarani Chandola Cathie Marsh Institute and Social Statistics www.cmist.manchester.ac.uk University of Manchester Co-director of the National Centre for Research Methods International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society & Health 

Prof. Chandola

Professor Tarani Chandola
Cathie Marsh Institute and Social Statistics
www.cmist.manchester.ac.uk
University of Manchester
Co-director of the National Centre for Research Methods International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society & Health

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The study examined the common perception that “any job is better than no job” to see whether this was true in terms of chronic stress levels. It followed up a group of unemployed adults representative of adults living in the UK, and compared their health and stress levels in terms of those who remained unemployed and those who became re-employed in poor and good quality work.

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Health-Related Quality of Life Varies Among US Workers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Taylor M. Shockey MPH

CDC/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
CDC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Our study examined health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 22 major occupation groups using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data. The BRFSS is an annual telephone survey that collects data from U.S. residents on their health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, and use of preventive services.

HRQOL is an individual’s self-perception of their physical and mental health over time and it provides a valuable measure of well-being. HRQOL is used by a variety of different fields, outside of public health, including psychology, social work, economics, and urban planning. HRQOL is a measure capable of linking these different fields and is used to determine disease burden, to monitor progress in achieving the Healthy People goals, to guide policy and legislation, to develop interventions, and to allocate resources where they are most needed. The Healthy People goals are 10-year targets for improving the health of Americans through health promotion activities and disease prevention efforts.

In relation to occupation, prior research that has evaluated HRQOL has typically focused on employment status, but not on specific job type. It’s been established, however, that job characteristics such as high demand, low control, role stress, bullying, work hours, etc., are associated with greater risk for common mental health problems as well as physical outcomes like headaches, fatigue, and gastrointestinal problems.

Our study wanted to determine if differences in HRQOL would exist among occupation groups.

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Rotational Shift Work Linked To Increased Risk of Hypertension, Especially in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sandhya Manohar, MBBS, Nephrology Fellow Project mentor: Sandra M. Herrmann, MD Department of Nephrology and Hypertension Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Dr. Sandhya Manohar

Sandhya Manohar, MBBS, Nephrology Fellow
Project mentor: Sandra M. Herrmann, MD
Department of Nephrology and Hypertension
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In the last few decades advances in the field of industrialization and technology has turned our world into a 24-7 work zone. Many organizations have turned to a shift system to keep up with the demands of the new world. The consequent changes to our circadian rhythm have resulted in dramatic effects to our body’s physiology. Reports have been surfacing of higher rates of diabetes, obesity, and even cancer in this shift work population.

The risk of hypertension though was controversial and so we set out to review this in our meta-analysis.

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Approval of Medical Disability Claims Vary By the Examiner

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Prof. Dr. Regina Kunz Professorin für Versicherungsmedizin Evidence-based Insurance Medicine I Departement Klinische Forschung Universitätsspital Basel Basel Switzerland

Prof. Regina Kunz

Prof. Dr. Regina Kunz
Professorin für Versicherungsmedizin
Evidence-based Insurance Medicine I Departement Klinische Forschung
Universitätsspital Basel
Basel Switzerland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Many workers seek wage replacement benefits due to a disabling illness or injury. Public and private insurance systems provide wage replacement benefits for such employees, as long as eligibility criteria are met. Insurers often arrange for evaluation of eligibility by medical professionals, but there are concerns regarding low quality evaluations and poor reliability between medical experts assessing the same claimant. In order to better understand this situation, we performed a systematic review of reproducibility studies on the inter-rater agreement in evaluation of disability.

We carried out a systematic review of 23 studies, conducted between 1992-2016, from 12 countries in Europe, North America, Australia, the Middle East, and Northeast Asia. The studies include those carried out in an insurance setting, with medical experts assessing claimants for work disability benefits, and in a research setting, where evaluation of patients took place outside of actual assessments, for example, for rehabilitation.

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Cardiac Disease Linked To Elevated Risk of Shoulder Pain and Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kurt T. Hegmann, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health Chief, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health The University of Utah Health Care

Dr. Kurt Hegmann

Kurt T. Hegmann, M.D., M.P.H.
Director, Rocky Mtn. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health
Chief, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health
The University of Utah Health Care

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This line of work for us began approximately 20 years ago.

Normal tendons never rupture, as the weak point when loading the muscle-tendon unit is either the muscle-tendon junction (i.e., a true muscle strain) or bone-tendon junction. Researchers in the 1960s reported there is poor blood supply in the area of rotator cuff tendon tears, providing one of the two main etiological theories of rotator cuff tears. The other main theory is “impingement syndrome” or a biomechanical impingement in the shoulder joint. Naturally, both theories could co-exist.

Next, we noted rotator cuff tendinitis and shoulder risks from tobacco in other studies. We also reported prior research of increased risks with obesity. These led us to the theory that these rotator cuff tears are likely vascular in etiology. The next problem was to show this.

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Who Returns To Work After First Hospitalization for Heart Failure?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rasmus Rørth MD From Department of Cardiology Rigshospitalet University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Dr. Rasmus Rørth

Rasmus Rørth MD
From Department of Cardiology
Rigshospitalet
University of Copenhagen, Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Heart failure is considered to be one of the most common, costly, disabling and deadly medical conditions and is thus a major health care problem. The ability to maintain a full-time job addresses a vital indirect consequence and cost of heart failure, beyond the usual clinical parameters such as mortality and hospitalization. Ability to work is more than just another measure of performance status. As well as its financial importance, employment is crucial for self-esteem and quality of life in patients with chronic illness. Obtaining information on labour force inclusion should, therefore, shed light on an unstudied consequence of heart failure and provide a novel perspective on the impact of heart failure on the lives of those who, perhaps, have most to lose from this condition.

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Bronchoscopy Can Expose Health Care Workers To Pathogens in Aerosol

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Genevieve Marchand Ph.D., RMCCM SCCM(Env) Microbiologiste agréée & Biochimiste Chercheure, Prévention des risques chimiques et biologiques IRSST

Dr-Genevieve-Marchand

Genevieve Marchand Ph.D., RMCCM SCCM(Env)
Microbiologiste agréée & Biochimiste
Chercheure, Prévention des risques chimiques et biologiques
IRSST

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: It is well known that Health Care Workers (HCWs) are at risk of occupationally acquired infections. Some procedures, such as bronchoscopies, are recognized to be high-risk tasks. Most researches that have linked infectious risk to specific task in healthcare settings did not measure the real bioaerosol exposure. Those link where mostly made from epidemiology observations. The aim of this study was to qualify and quantify the real bioaerosol concentrations found during bronchoscopy procedures in order to estimate the true occupational risk.

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Shift Work May Increase Risk of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

David Earnest, Ph.D. Professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine

Dr. David Earnest

David Earnest, Ph.D.
Professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Experimental Therapeutics
Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Earnest: When body clocks are disrupted, as they are when people engage in shift work or go to bed and get up at radically different times every few days, more severe ischemic strokes can result.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Dr. Earnest:  Whenever possible, go to bed and get up at the same time each day and keep regular mealtimes. If you do need to keep an irregular schedule, it is especially important to be mindful of stroke risk and try especially hard to eliminate other risk factors, such as hypertension and obesity.

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Mining and Construction Workers Most Affected by Occupational Hearing Loss

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Elizabeth A. Masterson, PhD CPH
Dr. Masterson is an epidemiologist in the NIOSH Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies
CDC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Masterson: Occupational hearing loss, primarily caused by high noise exposure, is the most common work-related illness in the United States. It is a permanent but entirely preventable condition. Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared the prevalence of hearing impairment within nine industry sectors and the associated impact on quality of life for noise-exposed workers.

Hearing impairment is hearing loss that impacts day-to-day activities. The Mining sector had the highest prevalence of workers with any hearing impairment, and with moderate or worse impairment, followed by the Construction and Manufacturing sectors. Impact on quality of life was measured by calculating disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). DALYs represented the number of healthy years lost because of hearing impairment. This study found that 2.5 healthy years were lost each year for every 1,000 noise-exposed U.S. workers because of hearing impairment. These lost years of good health were shared among the 13% of workers with hearing impairment (about 130 workers out of each 1,000 workers). Mining, Construction and Manufacturing workers lost more healthy years than workers in other industry sectors (3.5, 3.1 and 2.7 healthy years lost, respectively, each year for every 1,000 workers). Mild impairment accounted for 52% of all healthy years lost and moderate impairment accounted for 27%. 

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Acute Occupational Pesticide-Related Illness Highest in Agricultural Workers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Geoffrey M. Calvert MD

Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
CDC Cincinnati, Ohio

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Calvert: Since 1987, acute occupational pesticide-related illness and injury has been one of the conditions under surveillance by NIOSH. NIOSH supports these surveillance activities by providing cooperative agreement funding and technical support to state health departments. The SENSOR-Pesticides program is also partially funded by EPA. A total of 12 states currently participate in the SENSOR-Pesticides program.

With the 2015 publication of the Summary of Notifiable Non-Infectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks – United States, official statistics for the occurrence of acute occupational pesticide-related illness and injury were published for the first time in the same volume of the MMWR with information on nationally notifiable infectious diseases.

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Firefighters May Face Increased Risk of Cancer

Robert D. Daniels Ph.D Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Cincinnati, OhioMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robert D. Daniels Ph.D
Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Cincinnati, Ohio

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Daniels: In 2010, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers, with funding assistance from the U.S. Fire Administration, launched a multi-year study to examine whether fire fighters have a higher risk of cancer and other causes of death due to job exposures. Our study was designed to address limitations of previous fire fighter cancer research.

         We included a significantly larger population. With more than 30,000 career fire fighters who served in Chicago, Philadelphia, and San Francisco Fire Departments between 1950 and 2010, it is the largest study of United States fire fighters ever undertaken. In addition, both non-white and female fire fighters are represented.

         We looked not only at deaths from cancer, but also at the diagnosis of certain kinds of cancer, such as testicular and prostate cancer, which have higher survival rates. We also examined other causes of death to better understand the risk for various cancers and illnesses among fire fighters compared to the general public.

         We also examined the relation between cancer and several proxies of exposure, such as the number of fire runs, time spent at fires, and duration of employment of each firefighter (Dahm et al. 2015).

The study was conducted in two parts. The first part was aimed to answer the question: “Is cancer associated with firefighting?” by comparing firefighter cancer risk to that of the general population. The second part focused on the question: “Are higher-exposed firefighters more at risk?” Findings from both parts have been published in the journal, Occupational and Environmental Medicine (Daniels et al. 2014, 2015)

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World Trade Center Emergency Workers At High Risk Of Health Conditions

Dr Mayris P Webber Dr.PH. MPH Bureau of Health Services Fire Department of the City of New York Brooklyn, NY Professor of Clinical Epidemiology & Population Health Montefiore Medical Center NYMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Mayris P Webber Dr.PH. MPH

Bureau of Health Services Fire Department of the City of New York Brooklyn, NY
Professor of Clinical Epidemiology & Population Health
Montefiore Medical Center NY

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Webber:

  • To date, we and others have found adverse health outcomes associated with World Trade Center (WTC)  exposure among New York City’s first responders such as firefighters, police officers, and other rescue and recovery workers. We conducted the first study to concentrate on the health impact of the disaster on emergency medical service (EMS) workers.
  • In keeping with previous research on WTC’s first responders, we found that the WTC attacks adversely affected the physical and mental health of approximately 2,000 New York City Fire Department (FDNY) EMS who performed rescue and recovery work at the site.
  • We analyzed selected physical and mental health conditions that have been certified as being linked to the aftermath of the WTC attacks under the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010.
  • Over a 12 year period, between September 11 2001 and December 31 2013, the proportion of newly diagnosed cases of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was 12.1%; obstructive airways disease (OAD) 11.8%; rhinosinusitis 10.6%; and cancer 3.1%.
  • In their most recent mental health survey, nearly 17% of EMS workers reported symptoms consistent with depression; 7% with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); and 3% with harmful alcohol use.
  • Compared with EMS workers who did not work at the WTC site, EMS workers who worked at the WTC site in the morning of 9/11 (i.e., most intensely exposed) were at greatest risk for nearly all of the health conditions analyzed.
  • For example, they were almost four times as likely to have GERD and rhinosinusitis, seven times as likely to have probable PTSD, and twice as likely to have probable depression. (We use the term probable because we used screening questionnaires instead of professional diagnoses for these mental health conditions).

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