Familial History Improves Predictive Value of TOMM40 Gene in Alzheimer’s Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Auriel Willette, M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor Departments of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Psychology Iowa State University

Dr. Willette

Auriel Willette, M.S., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Departments of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Psychology
Iowa State University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Translocase of Outer Mitochondrial Membrane 40 (TOMM40) is a gene that regulates the width of the outer mitochondrial pore, facilitating the transport of ribosomal pre-proteins into the inner mitochondrial matrix for translational modification into functional proteins. In 2010, Dr. Allen Roses, who discovered the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene, Dr. Michael Lutz, and other colleagues found that a variation in poly-T length at locus rs10524523 (‘523) within intron 6 predicted Alzheimer’s disease onset. Specifically, a “long” versus “short” poly-T length was related to earlier age of onset by 8 years.

However, several multi-cohort studies either failed to replicate the findings or found the opposite relationship, where a “long” or “very long” poly-T length was related to later age of onset. The literature has remained mixed to this day.

We were interested in testing factors that might change the relationship between TOMM40 and both cognitive decline and risk for having Alzheimer’s disease. It is known that a family history (FH) of Alzheimer’s disease has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We reasoned, then, that FH may interact with TOMM40 to modulate how it was related to our outcomes of interest. We investigated this hypothesis in two separate cohorts: the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (WRAP), a late middle-aged cohort, and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a well-characterized sample of aged participants from across the Alzheimer’s spectrum.

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TeloView Measures Genomic Stability To Predict Disease Aggressiveness

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

3D SignaturesJason Flowerday, CEO
Director of 3D Signatures 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for 3D Signatures?

Response: 3D Signatures, and its clinical lab tests, which incorporate its proprietary TeloViewTM software analytics, is the culmination of over 20 years of ground-breaking research conducted by Dr. Sabine Mai and her colleagues. It is the only technology in the world that quantifies genomic instability, which is the hallmark of cancer and other proliferative diseases at the whole-cell level.

By measuring the degree of genomic instability from different tissues, TeloViewTM has produced clinically actionable distinctions in the stage of disease, rate of progression of disease, drug efficacy, and drug toxicity. The technology is well developed and supported by 22 clinical studies on over 2,000 patients on 13 different cancers including Alzheimer’s disease. The results have been exceptional and represent a universal biomarker platform across all disease areas that the company has investigated to date.

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Gene Delivered By Nanoparticle System Can Potentially Cure Congenital Blindness

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Zheng-Rong Lu, Ph.D.

M. Frank Rudy and Margaret Domiter Rudy Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, OH 44106

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Genetic vision disorders are a major cause of severe vision loss and blindness, especially in children and young adults. Currently, there are no approved therapies to treat these types of disorders.

This study focused on one such disease known as Leber’s congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA2). Patients with LCA2 are born with some degree of vision loss, and are often legally blind by early adulthood. LCA2 is a recessive disease caused by a mutation in one of the genes responsible for visual processing. LCA2 is a good candidate for gene therapy, and clinical trials underway to test viral vectors that deliver a healthy copy of the mutated gene into the eye have demonstrated considerable therapeutic efficacy. These trials have validated the feasibility of gene therapy to treat this disease, however viral vectors are limited by potential safety issues, complex preparation methods, and limitations on the size of genes that can be delivered.

In this study, we successfully treated LCA2 in mice for 120 days by delivering the gene responsible for LCA2 in a synthetic lipid nanoparticle instead of a viral vector. Our delivery system, called ECO, specifically targets the cells in the retinal pigmented epithelium, where the mutation behind LCA2 occurs. Our nanoparticle delivery system is easy to produce, safe, and has unlimited cargo capacity. Most important, our nanoparticle gene delivery system is a platform that can be used to deliver any gene into the retina, opening the door for safe and effective gene therapy for any genetic vision disorder.

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Do Our Genes Influence Our Attraction to Social Media?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Chance York, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mass Communication Kent State University

Dr. Chance York

Chance York, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mass Communication
Kent State University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This research used twin study survey data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) to investigate the relative influence of genetics and environment on social media use.

While the research cannot directly examine the gene-level influence on social media behavior, I was able to leverage known levels of genetic relatedness between identical and fraternal twins to suss out how much genetic traits and environmental factors impact frequency of using social media.

The results showed that between one- and two-thirds of variance in social media use is explained by genes, while environmental factors (parental socialization, peers, work, school, individual characteristics, etc.) explained the rest. In other words, this very specific communication behavior—social media use—is partially guided by our genetic makeup.

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GeneStrat Test Provides Quick Analysis of Genetic Lung Cancer Mutations

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Hestia Mellert, PhD

Director, Molecular Product Development
Biodesix: Making Medicine Personal
Boulder, CO

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Identifying specific genetic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients helps clinicians choose the best treatment options; specific therapies that target mutations can improve patient outcomes, including reducing the risk of death or lessening the severity of the disease. However, nearly 80% of cancer patients do not have genetic mutation results available at initial oncology consultation; up to 25% of patients begin treatment before receiving their results. These factors hinder physicians’ ability to pursue optimal treatment strategies.

This study found that a blood-based assay, the GeneStrat test, provides results in 72 hours for 94% of patients, which expands testing options, and supports faster treatment decisions by physicians.

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Proove Opioid Risk Profile Predictive of Opioid Use Disorder

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Maneesh Sharma, M.D</strong> Director of Pain Medicine MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Director of the Interventional Pain Institute Baltimore, Maryland

Dr. Maneesh Sharma

Maneesh Sharma, M.D
Director of Pain Medicine
MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
Medical Director of the Interventional Pain Institute
Baltimore, Maryland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Opioid abuse in chronic pain patients is a major public health issue, with rapidly increasing addiction rates and deaths from unintentional overdose more than quadrupling since 1999. Just in the last year alone according to the CDC, synthetic opioid deaths have increased 72%. As a practicing interventional pain specialist, I am confronted with the challenge of assessing patient risk for opioids as I evaluate multi-modal approaches to effective pain management. Existing tools are inadequate, as they either rely on a urine toxicology test to evaluate a patient’s current potential substance abuse as a predictor of future abuse, or on a patient’s honesty to fill out a questionnaire. We know that many patients who are not currently abusing illicit drugs or misusing prescription medications can develop prescription opioid tolerance, dependence, or abuse—especially with prolonged opioid therapy. Furthermore, we know that patients who are looking to abuse medications or divert those prescriptions will obviously lie on questionnaires.
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CRISPR Gene Editing May Lead To Cure For Retinitis Pigmentosa

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kang Zhang, M.D., Ph.D.</strong> Professor of Ophthalmology Chief, Ophthalmic Genetics Founding Director, Institute for Genomic Medicine Co-Director, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Institute for Engineering in Medicine Board Certification in Ophthalmology Fellowship in Vitreoretinal Disease and Surgery Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center Guangzhou Medical University Guangzhou China

Dr. Kang Zhang

Kang Zhang, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Ophthalmology
Chief, Ophthalmic Genetics
Founding Director, Institute for Genomic Medicine
Co-Director, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Institute for Engineering in Medicine
Board Certification in Ophthalmology
Fellowship in Vitreoretinal Disease and Surgery
Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center
Guangzhou Medical University
Guangzhou China
MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Retinitis pigmentosa is a common blinding condition characterized by mutations in rod photoreceptor specific genes, night blindness and tunnel visual with eventual loss of day vision. Since it can be caused by numerous different mutations in many genes therefore it has been difficult to provide treatment benefits to a majority of patients. Traditional gene therapy has been in a piece-meal fashion, meaning to create a therapy for a particular gene or mutation. In this paper, we describe a universal gene therapy approach using the latest gene editing technology CRISPR/CAS9 to reprogram rod photoreceptors to cone photoreceptors with reversal of RP and restoration of vision.

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Trunk and Branch Drivers Distinguish Early vs Late Mutations in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sara Torrecilla Recio

PhD Student
Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program – Division of Liver Diseases Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York, NY

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer, which represents the second-leading cause of cancer related death worldwide. The landscape of molecular alterations in HCC has been thoroughly explored using next-generation sequencing technologies in single biopsies of tumors. However, in the recent years it has been demonstrated that not all the regions of a tumor harbor the same molecular alterations. This intra-tumor heterogeneity may lead to a misinterpretation of the molecular landscape of the malignancy since not all the molecular alterations would be captured by single-biopsies.

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New Breast Cancer Genes May Identify Women Who Can Benefit From Enhanced Screening

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Fergus J. Couch, Ph.D. Zbigniew and Anna M. Scheller Professor of Medical Research Chair, Division of Experimental Pathology Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN 55905

Dr. Couch

Fergus J. Couch, Ph.D.
Zbigniew and Anna M. Scheller Professor  of Medical Research
Chair, Division of Experimental Pathology
Department of Laboratory Medicine  and Pathology
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The main finding is that RAD51D, BARD1, and MSH6 can now be included in the list of moderate risk breast cancer genes. In contrast, other genes such as MRE11A and RAD50 do not increase risk of breast cancer. In addition, we provide initial estimates of the level of breast cancer risk associated with mutations in the genes that cause breast cancer. The “new” breast cancer genes may now be useful for identifying women who can benefit from enhanced screening. These new data will need to be considered by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) which provides guidelines for clinical management of individuals with mutations in cancer predisposition genes. These results will also be useful for identifying members of families who are at increased risk of breast cancer.

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Gene Involved in Defective Skin Barrier and Eczema and Ichthyosis Identified

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Akio Kihara, PhD. Laboratory of Biochemistry Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University Sapporo, Japan

Dr. Akio Kihara

Akio Kihara, PhD.
Laboratory of Biochemistry
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University
Sapporo, Japan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The skin barrier is the most powerful defensive mechanism terrestrial animals possess against pathogens and harmful substances such as allergens and pollutants. Recent studies indicate that lipids play a central role in skin barrier formation. Multi-lamellar structures consisting of lipids are formed extracellularly in the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of epidermis, and their high hydrophobicity prevents the invasion of external pathogens and compounds.

The stratum corneum-specific lipid acylceramide is especially important for skin barrier formation. Decreases in acylceramide levels are associated with cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. However, the mechanism behind acylceramide production is poorly understood, especially regarding the last step of acylceramide production: i.e., esterification of ω-hydroxyceramide with linoleic acid. This means that the broader picture of the molecular mechanisms behind skin barrier formation still remained unclear.

Although PNPLA1 has been identified as an ichthyosis-causative gene, its function in skin barrier formation remains unresolved. In the present study, we revealed that PNPLA1 catalyzes the last step of acylceramide synthesis. Our finding completes our knowledge of the entire pathway of the acylceramide production, providing important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin barrier formation.

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26 Additional Genes Linked to Intellectual Disability Identified

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Muhammad Ayub MBBS, MRCPsych, MSc., MD

Professor of Psychiatry Chair Division of Developmental Disabilities
Department of Psychiatry Queens
University Kingston
Kingston ON Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? 

Response: Intellectual Disability affects about 1 percent of the population worldwide. Genetics play a major role in its etiology. Better understanding of the genetic causes is a necessary step in development of improved diagnosis and treatment. Recessive inheritance where the affected child inherits a defective copy of a gene from both the parents is an important genetic mechanism for prevalence of the disease in populations where within family marriages are common. These types of marital bonds are common in South Asia and Middle Eastern countries. The families where parents are related are an effective resource to study recessive forms of Intellectual Disability.

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Colorectal Cancer Risk Model Using Environmental and Genetic Factors

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Victor Moreno, PhD. Director of Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine University of Barcelona Barcelona, Spain

Dr. Moreno

Victor Moreno, PhD.
Director of Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine
University of Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain

Gemma Ibáñez-Sanz, MD Gastroenterologist. *Cancer Prevention and Control Unit, Catalan Institute of Oncology. L’Hospitalet deLlobregat, Barcelona, SPAIN *Gastroenterology Department, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL,  L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain

Dr. Ibáñez-Sanz

Gemma Ibáñez-Sanz, MD
Gastroenterologist.
*Cancer Prevention and Control Unit, Catalan Institute of Oncology. L’Hospitalet deLlobregat, Barcelona, SPAIN
*Gastroenterology Department, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL,
L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by faecal occult blood testing has been demonstrated to reduce CRC incidence and mortality, as well as being a cost-effective strategy compared to no screening. Currently, the target population is defined basically by age (≥50 years old), which has been called a ‘one-size-fits-all’ strategy. This strategy implies performing unnecessary screening tests in low-risk people leading to avoidable risks for patients and extra costs for the healthcare system. On the other hand, high-risk patients may receive non-invasive testing, which is a suboptimal screening technique in their case. Several risk prediction models, either for  colorectal cancer or advanced neoplasia, have been previously developed, all with limited discriminating ability.

We have developed a risk stratification model that combines environmental factors with family history and genetic susceptibility. Furthermore, we have assessed the relative contribution of these factors and the utility of the model for risk stratification and public health intervention.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Data from common genetic susceptibility loci could be useful to stratify colorectal cancer screening in average-risk population. Individuals in the top quintile of risk alleles have an 82% increased risk compared to those in the lower quintile. We have estimated the impact of determining an individual environmental and genetic risk score in a Spanish CRC screening population. In our model, although the genetic factors are significant contributors, the modifiable risk factors contribute more strongly. Risk assessment may increase screening participation and adoption of healthier lifestyles.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: On average, each environmental risk factor increases CRC risk by 35%, while each risk allele only increases it by 7%. This implies that the change of one modifiable risk factor towards healthier lifestyle might offset the effect of 4 risk alleles. Given the fact that environmental factors explain part of the CRC risk, we believe it to be important to give thought to incorporating clinical data to encourage individuals to achieve a healthier lifestyle. As the European Code Against Cancer recommends, and our findings confirm, one should have a healthy diet, a healthy body weight, be physically active and should not smoke or a high consumption of alcohol.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future prospective studies should aim to analyse if stratifying by genetic and lifestyle risk scores is useful and cost-effective to improve screening. Subjects with higher predicted risk should probably start screening earlier and decrease the intervals between tests, while low risk individuals could start later or space more the between test intervals.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

Response: Population acceptability of genetic tests is not well known. We are currently recruiting subjects from colorectal cancer screening and gastroenterology clinics in a study called COLSCREEN to assess risk perception and attitudes regarding genetic testing to prevent cancer.

No disclosures

Citation:

Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 24;7:43263. doi: 10.1038/srep43263.

Risk Model for Colorectal Cancer in Spanish Population Using Environmental and Genetic Factors: Results from the MCC-Spain study.

Ibáñez-Sanz G1, Díez-Villanueva A1, Alonso MH1,2, Rodríguez-Moranta F2,3, Pérez-Gómez B2,4,5, Bustamante M2,6, Martin V2,7, Llorca J2,8, Amiano P2,9, Ardanaz E2,10, Tardón A2,11, Jiménez-Moleón JJ2,12, Peiró R2,13, Alguacil J2,14, Navarro C2,15, Guinó E1,2, Binefa G1,2, Navarro PF2,4,5, Espinosa A2,6, Dávila-Batista V7, Molina AJ2,7, Palazuelos C8, Castaño-Vinyals G2,6,16,17, Aragonés N2,4,5, Kogevinas M2,6,16,17,18, Pollán M2,4,5, Moreno V1,2,19.

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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