Discovery of New Gene That Causes Sudden Death in Young Athletes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Lia Crotti, MD, PhD

Department of Cardiovascular, Neural and Metabolic Sciences
San Luca Hospital
IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Sudden cardiac death in one of the major cause of death in Western Countries and among the causes of these deaths in young people under the age of 35, inherited forms of cardiomyopathy have a prominent role. Among these cardiomyopathies, Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC) plays a major role. In ARVC, the heart tissue is replaced by fatty and fibrous tissue. This process encourages the development of life-threatening arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation, that causes a cardiac arrest and sudden death in few minutes without a ready device to shock the heart. Intense physical activity favors the progression of the disease and arrhythmias are frequently triggered by adrenergic activation: those are the reason why young athletes with this disease are at high risk.

Continue reading

70-Gene Signature Changes 50% of Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Advice

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Anne Kuijer, MD

Departments of Surgery and Radiology
University Medical Center Utrecht and
Thijs van Dalen, PhD
Department of Surgery
Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In recent years it has become evident that clinicopathological factors fail to accurately determine prognosis in hormone receptor positive early stage breast cancer patients at intermediate risk of developing metastases. Gene-expression profiles, such as the 70-gene signature (MammaPrint) are therefore increasingly used for chemotherapy decision-making. In the current multicentre study we assessed the impact of 70-gene signature use on chemotherapy decisions in these patients. We demonstrated that, without the use of the 70-gene signature, half of patients was advised chemotherapy, which reflects the current controversy regarding chemotherapy benefit. Use of the 70-gene signature changed the chemotherapy advice in half of all patients and adherence to the 70-gene signature result was high.

Continue reading

Effect of Moderate-Intensity Exercise Training on Peak Oxygen Consumption in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sara Saberi, MD Assistant Professor Inherited Cardiomyopathy Program Frankel Cardiovascular Center University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems

Dr. Sara Saberi

Sara Saberi, MD
Assistant Professor
Inherited Cardiomyopathy Program
Frankel Cardiovascular Center
University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are often told not to exercise or to significantly curb their exercise due to concern over the potential risk of increased ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. There is no data regarding risks/benefits of exercise in HCM though. There is, however, data that shows that patients with HCM are less active and more obese than the general population AND a majority feel that exercise restrictions negatively impact their emotional well-being.

So, we devised a randomized clinical trial of a 16-week moderate-intensity aerobic exercise program versus usual activity with the primary outcome being change in peak VO2 (oxygen consumption). This exercise intervention resulted in a 1.27 mL/kg/min improvement in peak VO2 over the usual activity group, a statistically significant finding. There were no major adverse events (no death, aborted sudden cardiac death, appropriate ICD therapies, or sustained ventricular tachycardia). There was also a 10% improvement in quality of life as measured by the Physical Functioning scale of the SF-36v2.

Continue reading

Racial Disparities in Genetic Testing of Women With Breast Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Cary P. Gross, MD Section of General Internal Medicine Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT

Dr. Cary Gross

Cary P. Gross, MD
Section of General Internal Medicine
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Prior work has demonstrated racial and socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes.  As the oncology field has progressed over the past decade, the use of genetic testing to guide treatment decisions is one of the most exciting new developments.

Our team was concerned that these new gene tests, which can offer important benefits, may have the potential to exacerbate disparities further.  That is, if there is unequal access to gene testing among patients for whom it is recommended, then our progress against cancer will not be equitably shared among people of all races and ethnicities.

Continue reading

Genotypes Can Increase or Decrease Young Adult Financial Outcomes, Depending on Parental Income

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Emily Rauscher PhD Assistant Professor Department of Sociology University of Kansas

Dr. Rausher

Emily Rauscher PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Sociology
University of Kansas  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: A lot of previous research has identified genotypes that increase sensitivity to context.  Much of this research, however, looks at particular aspects of health and is not able to address the methodological challenges of investigating gene-environment interactions.  To gain a better sense of the potential outcomes that may be susceptible to gene-environment interactions, I examine financial standing in young adulthood.  Testing this type of interaction is challenging because genotype and social environment are not randomly distributed throughout the population. Given this non-random distribution, unobserved confounders (such as parental behaviors, education, ethnicity, or social capital) could influence both parent and child financial standing.

Continue reading

Gene “Decorations” Can Serve as Blood Biomarkers To Detect Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kun Zhang, PhD Professor UCSD Department of Bioengineering La Jolla, CA 92093-0412

Dr. Kun Zhang

Kun Zhang, PhD
Professor
UCSD Department of Bioengineering
La Jolla, CA 92093-0412

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We have been interested in a type of chemical modification on the DNA, called CpG methylation, for years. This is like a decoration of DNA molecules that is specific to the cell type or tissue type. We were particularly interested in studying how such decoration spread along the DNA molecules. In this study, we did a very comprehensive search of the entire human genome for various human cell types and tissue types, and found close to 150,000 regions (called MHB in this study) in which adjacent CpG share the same decoration. We then went on to find out how many of such regions are unique to each normal cell/tissue type, and how many are specific to cancers. Then we took some of these highly informative regions as “biomarkers”, and showed that we can detect the absence or presence of cancer, and, in the latter case, where the tumor grow, in a patient’s blood.

Continue reading

Genetic Variants Tied To Kidney Disease in African Americans

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Katalin Susztak MD, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104

Dr. Susztak

Katalin Susztak MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Previous studies showed an association between genetic variants in the APOL1 gene and kidney disease development, but it has not been confidently shown that this genetic variant is actually causal for kidney disease. For this reason we developed a mouse model that recapitulates the human phenotype.

Continue reading

Genetic Variant of p53 Gene May Explain Increased Breast Cancer Risk in African American Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Maureen E. Murphy, Ph.D. Professor and Program Leader, Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program Associate Vice President for Faculty Affairs Associate Director for Education and Career Development The Wistar Institute Philadelphia, PA 19104

Dr. Murphy

Maureen E. Murphy, Ph.D.
Professor and Program Leader, Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program
Associate Vice President for Faculty Affairs
Associate Director for Education and Career Development
The Wistar Institute
Philadelphia, PA 19104

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The Murphy group discovered a coding-region variant of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, called Pro47Ser, that exists in individuals of African descent. In previous studies this group reported that this amino acid change reduces the ability of p53 to function as a tumor suppressor.

In this study, African American women from two different large cohorts were assessed for the incidence of the Pro47Ser variant in pre-menopausal breast cancer. A modest but statistically significant association was found between Pro47Ser and pre-menopausal breast cancer.

Continue reading

New Gene For Rare Type Of Muscular Dystrophy Identified

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Chiara Manzini PhD Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology, and Integrative Systems Biology George Washington University

Dr Chiara Manzini

Dr Chiara Manzini PhD
Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology, and Integrative Systems Biology
George Washington University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: I have been working on finding genes that are mutated in rare forms of muscular dystrophy associated with brain and eye deficits for many years.

In the current study, which was a large collaborative effort, we found that mutations in the INPP5K gene cause a new type of muscular dystrophy with short stature, intellectual disability and cataracts. INPP5K is critical for processing a chemical called inositol phosphate which has multiple functions within the cell. We found that the mutations in the patients severely disrupt INPP5K function and when we removed the gene during zebrafish development, the fish showed the same findings observed in the patients: small size, disrupted muscle structure and eye deficits. We are very excited because this is a new disease gene for muscular dystrophy and a novel disease mechanisms, which can open up multiple new lines of investigation.

Continue reading

Long Telomeres May Be Good For Heart Disease, Bad For Cancer Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Philip C. Haycock, PhD MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit University of Bristol Bristol, England

Dr. Philip Haycock

Philip C. Haycock, PhD
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit
University of Bristol
Bristol, England

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The direction and causal nature of the association of telomere length with risk of cancer and other diseases is uncertain. In a Mendelian randomization study of 83 non-communicable diseases, including 420,081 cases and 1,093,105 controls, we found that longer telomeres were associated with increased risk for several cancers but reduced risk for some other diseases, including cardiovascular diseases.

Continue reading

Genetic Defect in DNA Repair Enzyme Linked to Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
G. Andrés Cisneros, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry Center for Advanced Scientific Computing and Modeling, University of North Texas

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The accurate maintenance of DNA is crucial, if DNA damage is not addressed it can lead to various diseases including cancer. Therefore, the question arises about what happens if enzymes in charge of DNA repair are themselves mutated. We previously developed a method to perform targeted searches for cancer-related SNPs on genes of interest called HyDn-SNP-S. This method was applied to find prostate-cancer SNPs on DNA dealkylases in the ALKB family of enzymes.

Our results uncovered a particular mutation on ALKBH7, R191Q, that is significantly associated with prostate cancer. Subsequent computer simulations and experiments indicate that this cancer mutation results in a decreased ability of ALKBH7 to bind its co-factor, thus impeding its ability to perform its native function.

Continue reading

21-Gene Expression Assay May Clarify Need For Chemotherapy in Early Breast Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Carlos H. Barcenas M.D., M.Sc. Assistant Professor Department of Breast Medical Oncology MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Carlos Barcenas

Carlos H. Barcenas M.D., M.Sc.
Assistant Professor
Department of Breast Medical Oncology
MD Anderson Cancer Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Over the last decade we have realized that we were over-treating many early stage breast cancer patients. In addition to the chemotherapy’s obvious side effects, there are also long term complications for breast cancer survivors. Since 2005, we are using a 21-gene-expression assay that predicts the risk of distant recurrence among early stage breast cancer patients. In 2015, initial results from the international clinical trial, TAILORx, found that women with hormone receptor positive, HER2 and lymph node negative early stage disease that had a low recurrence score (RS) of 0-10 from this assay could have chemotherapy omitted altogether. While these findings changed care for women with a low RS, questions remain regarding the management of women with an intermediate RS, defined by this trial as a RS of 11-25. For our retrospective, single-institution study we identified 1,424 stage I and II breast cancer patients with hormone receptor positive, HER2 and lymph node negative treated between 2005 and 2011 who underwent the 21-gene expression assay. The RS distribution was: 297 (21 percent) scored 0–10; 894 (63 percent) scored 11-25; and 233 (16 percent) scored >25.

Of those groups, 1.7, 15 and 73.4 percent received chemotherapy, respectively. With a median follow up of 58 months, those with a RS of 11-25 had an invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) rate at five years of 92.6 percent, regardless if patients received chemotherapy or not. Among those patients who did not receive chemotherapy, the estimated rates of IDFS and overall survival was 93 percent and 98 percent, respectively, which was comparable to those who did receive chemotherapy.

Continue reading