Author Interviews, Cancer, Thromboembolism / 07.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Liang He Department of Anesthesiology Yan’an Hospital of Kunming City, kunming, 650051, China MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of this study? Dr. He: We evaluated the prognostic value of plasma heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) with the guidelines of acute PE of European Society Cardiology (ESC). We found that higher H-FABP level (above 6 or 7 ng/ml) was associated with an increased of 30-d mortality and complicated clinical events, from six studies of 85 articles included. H-FABP has the potential to be a novel prognostic marker that can help optimize patient management strategies and risk-stratification algorithms in the population of patients with acute pulmonary embolism. However, few studies had been specifically designed to answer our research questions. (more…)
Author Interviews, Herpes Viruses, HIV, PLoS / 06.07.2014

Dr. Don C. Des Jarlais PhD Director, International Research Core, Center for Drug Use and HIV Research Research Fellow, NDRI Director of Research, Baron Edmond de Rothschild Chemical Dependency Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of MedicineMedicalResearch Interview with: Dr. Don C. Des Jarlais PhD Director, International Research Core, Center for Drug Use and HIV Research Research Fellow, NDRI Director of Research, Baron Edmond de Rothschild Chemical Dependency Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Des Jarlais: HIV infection among non-injecting users of heroin and cocaine doubled doubled over the last several decades, from 7% to 14%. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) increases both susceptibility to and transmissibility of HIV. We examined HSV-2 infection among non-injecting heroin and cocaine user over the same time period using stored serum samples. HSV-2 infection was strongly related to HIV infection, and both increased over time. We calculated population attributable risk percentages (PAR%) to estimate the extent to which HSV-2 was driving increased HIV infection. HSV-2 infection was responsible for approximately half of the increase in HIV infection (more…)
Author Interviews, BMJ, Heart Disease / 04.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Patrícia Lourenço Serviço de Medicina Interna, Centro Hospitalar São João Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Unidade I&D Cardiovascular do Porto Monteiro, Portugal; Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Lourenço: A low prealbumin at hospital discharge associates with morbidity and mortality in acute heart failure patients. The prognostic value of low prealbumin in heart failure is independent of other nutritional markers and of the inflammatory status. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Electronic Records, Medicare, Stroke / 04.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with Hiraku Kumamar, MD, MPH Department of Epidemiology Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA and Soko Setoguchi-Iwata, M.D. Duke Clinical Research Institute Durham, NC 27715 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: We evaluated the accuracy of discharge diagnosis of stroke in the Medicare claims database by linking it to a nationwide epidemiological study cohort with 30239 participants called REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS). We found that among the 282 events captured using a strict claims definition of stroke, 91% were true events.  We also found that 12% of the overall strokes had been identified only by Medicare claims, strongly supporting the use of these readily available data for event follow-up in cohort studies. (more…)
Author Interviews, Sleep Disorders / 04.07.2014

Nathaniel F. Watson, MD, MSc Professor of Neurology, University of Washington Co-director, University of Washington Medicine Sleep Center Director, Harborview Medical Center Sleep Clinic Seattle, WashingtonMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Nathaniel F. Watson, MD, MSc Professor of Neurology, University of Washington Co-director, University of Washington Medicine Sleep Center Director, Harborview Medical Center Sleep Clinic Seattle, Washington MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Watson: The Singh Index is a composite measure of socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods. We found that as Singh Index increased, sleep duration reduced. This was true in the total sample of twins, and within twin pairs. The fact that we saw this within twin pairs means the association is present after controlling for genetics and shared environment, which substantially strengthens the association. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 03.07.2014

Sripal Bangalore, MD, MHA Director of Research, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Director, Cardiovascular Outcomes Group, Associate Professor of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sripal Bangalore, MD, MHA Director of Research, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Director, Cardiovascular Outcomes Group, Associate Professor of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Bangalore: We found that while CABG was associated with mortality benefit when compared with bare metal stents or first generation drug eluting stent, the gap between CABG and PCI was smaller and non significant when PCI was with newer generation DES. The same was true for repeat revascularization with the magnitude of benefit with CABG descending considerable from comparison with balloon angioplasty to newer generation DES. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Lancet, Mayo Clinic, Radiation Therapy / 03.07.2014

Dr. Robert Foote MD Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MNMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Robert Foote MD Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Foote: Charged particle therapy (mainly protons and carbon ions) provide superior overall survival, disease-free survival and tumor control when compared to conventional photon therapy.  In particular, it appears that proton beam therapy provides superior disease-free survival and tumor control when compared to the state of the art intensity modulated radiation therapy using photons. (more…)
Author Interviews, Gastrointestinal Disease, Genetic Research, NEJM, Pediatrics / 03.07.2014

Dr. Daniel AgardhMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Daniel Agardh M.D., Ph.D Department of Pediatrics Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit Skåne University Hospital Malmo, Sweden, MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Agardh: In this study, we stratify the risk of celiac disease among children according to their HLA genotype and country of residence. We confirm that HLA-DQ2/2 genotype is the major risk factor for early celiac disease, but also show how the risk differs between the participating countries despite of sharing similar HLA risk. This points to the direction of an interaction between HLA and the environment that eventually lead to an autoimmune response in genetic susceptible children. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Chocolate, PAD / 03.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lorenzo Loffredo, MD and Francesco Violi, MD Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: Dark chocolate is rich of polyphenols; these natural substances exert antioxidant properties and, through an increase of nitric oxide, dilate arteries. Our research group applied this effect to enhance blood flow in a very common disease, the peripheral arterial disease. This disease is characterized by reduced blood flow to the limbs. There are not any drugs that improve this blood flow, but dark chocolate could. Our study suggest that dark chocolate, and only dark chocolate, could reduce oxidative stress and improve blood flow and walking autonomy in patients with peripheral arterial disease. We observed no effect on blood flow, oxidative stress and on walking autonomy in PAD patients after milk chocolate assumption. This lack of effect was probably due to the low concentration of polyphenols in milk chocolate. (more…)
Accidents & Violence, Author Interviews, Global Health, Lancet, Pharmacology / 03.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tamara Haegerich, PhD Deputy Associate Director for Science Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention CDC - National Center for Injury Prevention and ControlMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tamara Haegerich, PhD Deputy Associate Director for Science Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention CDC - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Haegerich: In the first three decades of life, more people in the US die from injuries and violence than from any other cause. Approximately 60% of fatal injuries are unintentional (for example, from motor vehicle crashes, drug overdose, and falls), 20% are due to suicide, and 20% are due to homicide. Injuries and violence have been linked to a wide range of physical, mental health, and reproductive health problems, and chronic diseases. They take an enormous economic toll, including the cost of medical care and lost productivity. Importantly, injuries and violence are preventable through education, behavior change, policy, engineering, and environmental supports. For example, laws that promote the use of seat belts and child safety seats, and prevent drunk driving, can reduce motor-vehicle-related injuries. Early childhood home visitation, school-based programs, and therapeutic foster care are examples of evidence-based approaches to preventing violence. Improving proper prescribing of painkillers and access to treatment for substance misuse could prevent prescription drug overdoses. Improvements are possible by framing injuries and violence as preventable, identifying interventions that are cost-effective and based on research, providing information to decision makers, and strengthening the capacity of the health care system. (more…)
Author Interviews, Hematology, JAMA, Stem Cells, Transplantation / 03.07.2014

John F. Tisdale, MDMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. John Tisdale MD Molecular and Clinical Hematology Branch National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Tisdale: Using a nonmyeloablative allogeneic HLA-match peripheral blood stem cell transplantation strategy aimed at tolerance induction, we were able to revert the phenotype in 26 of 30 adult patients with severe sickle cell disease ranging in age from 16 to 65 years. In contrast to standard transplantation strategies which rely on high doses of chemo and/or radiotherapy after which the entire bone marrow and blood system is replaced by that of the donor, our patients had a mixture of their own and that of their donor. This procedure was well tolerated, with no non-relapse mortality, and led to complete replacement of red blood cells by that of the donor in successfully engrafted patients. This replacement resulted in decreases in pain, pain medication usage, hospitalizations, and improvements in organ function. (more…)
Author Interviews, Connective Tissue Disease, Transplantation / 03.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: ProfProf. Dr. Jacob M. van Laar Professor and Chair Dept of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology University Medical Center Utrecht . Dr. Jacob M. van Laar Professor and Chair Dept of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology University Medical Center Utrecht MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. van Laar: The results of the ASTIS-trial demonstrate that stem cell transplantation in selected patients with early, diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis, a rare, autoimmune connective tissue disease, prolongs long-term survival and improves clinical manifestations (skin, lung) and quality of life, when compared to monthly infusions with cyclophosphamide. The benefits must be weighed against the risks which include early  treatment-related mortality (10% in the ASTIS-trial) and viral infections. (more…)
Aging, Author Interviews, Sleep Disorders / 03.07.2014

Dr. June Chi-Yan Lo Research Fellow Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School SingaporeMedicalResearch.com: Interview with: Dr. June Chi-Yan Lo Research Fellow Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Lo: The Duke-NUS study examined the data of 66 older Chinese adults, from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study. Participants underwent structural MRI brain scans measuring brain volume and neuropsychological assessments testing cognitive function every two years. Additionally, their sleep duration was recorded through a questionnaire. Those who slept fewer hours showed evidence of faster brain aging and decline in cognitive performance. (more…)
Author Interviews, Diabetes, Lancet / 03.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Yves Reznik Department of Endocrinology, University of Caen Côte de Nacre Regional Hospital Center Caen, France MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. Reznik: OPT2MISE definitively demonstrate that pump therapy is a valuable option for treating those type 2 diabetes patients with uncontrolled hyperglycemia despite a high dose insulin regimen including at least 3 injections per day of rapid-acting and slow-acting insulin analogues, the gold standard for intensified insulin therapy. Such benefit on glucose control is obtained with lower daily insulin doses and without weight gain in comparison with multiple injection therapy. Pump therapy is effective in a population of patients un-preselected for their ability to deal with a medical device. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Pharmacology, Testosterone / 03.07.2014

Jacques Baillargeon, PhD Director, Epidemiology Division Associate Professor Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health University of Texas Medical Branch MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jacques Baillargeon, PhD Director, Epidemiology Division Associate Professor Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health University of Texas Medical Branch MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Baillargeon: The main findings of the study were that older men who were treated with testosterone did not appear to have an increased risk of Myocardial Infarction.  For men with high MI risk, testosterone use appeared to be modestly protective against MI. (more…)
Author Interviews, Breast Cancer / 03.07.2014

Dr. Katja Pinker MD Department of Radiology Medical University of Vienna · MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Katja Pinker MD Department of Radiology Medical University of Vienna · MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Pinker: We hypothesized that by imaging multiple key processes involved in cancer development and growth with multiparametric PET/MRI an improved non-invasive diagnosis of breast tumors is possible. To test this hypothesis, we conducted this first clinical feasibility study. Mutliparametric PET/MRI allows an improved non-invasive differentiation of benign and mailgnant breast tumors than currently used contrast-enhanced MRI alone. By its use unnecessary breast biopsies in benign tumors can be avoided without missing cancer. (more…)
Author Interviews, Supplements, Wake Forest / 02.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Scott A. Davis, MA Research Administrative Coordinator Department of Dermatology Wake Forest School of Medicine MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: St. John’s wort (SJW), a common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment for depression, is frequently used together with drugs that may interact dangerously with it. In data from the 1993-2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative survey of physician visits from the National Center for Health Statistics, SJW was prescribed together with drugs such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), benzodiazepines, warfarin, statins, digoxin, verapamil, and oral contraceptives. Using SJW together with other antidepressants may cause serotonin syndrome, a potentially fatal condition. (more…)
Author Interviews, Breast Cancer, JNCI, MD Anderson, Weight Research / 02.07.2014

Sai-Ching Jim Yeung, MD, PhD, FACP Professor of Medicine The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Emergency Medicine Department of Endocrine Neoplasia & Hormonal Disorders Houston, Texas  77230-1402MedicalResearch.com Interview with Sai-Ching Jim Yeung, MD, PhD, FACP Professor of Medicine The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Emergency Medicine Department of Endocrine Neoplasia & Hormonal Disorders Houston, Texas  77230-1402 MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Yeung: We believe that this study has bridged a significant gap in knowledge between epidemiological data (the association of obesity and poor breast cancer prognosis) and biological mechanisms mediating the impact of obesity on cancer. This study provides an important mechanistic insight into the causal relationship between obesity and breast cancer growth.
  1. Direct evidence for the links between obesity-associated changes in the biological processes and hallmarks of cancer in human estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. 
It is well known that obesity is associated epidemiologicaly with decreased survival in ER+ breast cancer patients. Although a body of experimental literature exists to suggest important roles for estrogen, insulin/IGF-1 and adipokine signaling and inflammation in the mechanisms mediating the impact of obesity on cancer, direct evidence for these mechanisms and their importance relative to one another is lacking in cancers from obese humans. Functional transcriptomic analysis of a prospective observation cohort with treatment-naïve ER+ breast cancer samples identified the insulin/PI3K signaling and secretion of cytokines among the top biological processes involved. Many of the obesity-associated changes in biological processes can be linked to cancer hallmarks.  Upstream regulator analysis identified estrogen (?-estradiol), insulin (INS1), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), and adipokines [vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), tissue necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-6 (IL6), oncostatin-M (OSM), chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5), leptin (LEP), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), and interleukin-10 (IL10)] in mediating the impact of obesity on human ER+ breast cancer.
  1. Experimental evidence that obesity causes accelerated oncogene-driven ER+ breast cancer carcinogenesis.
While it is not possible to conduct a human experiment to prospectively examine the causal relationship between obesity and breast cancer, we created a transgenic mouse model with genetically induced obesity and oncogene-driven breast cancer.  With this model we found strong in vivo evidence using both longitudinal experiments and cross-sectional experiments that obesity accelerated oncogene-driven breast carcinogenesis. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, NEJM, Stroke / 01.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Tommaso Sanna MD Institute of Cardiology Catholic University of the Sacred Heart Rome, Italy MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Sanna: In patients with cryptogenic stroke, continuous ECG monitoring with an implantable device, called the Reveal XT Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM), discovered Atrial Fibrillation in 6.4 times more patients than conventional diagnostic strategies at six months, 7.3 times more patients at 12 months, and 8.8 times more patients at 36 months. In more detail, after 36 months of follow-up, 30% of patients with cryptogenic stroke had at least one episode of atrial fibrillation. (more…)
Author Interviews, Colon Cancer, JNCI / 01.07.2014

Kaspar Truninger, MD, FMH Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine Langenthal, SwitzerlandMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kaspar Truninger, MD, FMH Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine Langenthal, Switzerland MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Truninger: In our study, we investigated the effect of lifestyle exposure on DNA methylation. We measured genome-wide promoter CpG methylation in 1092 normal colon biopsies from 546 healthy females. We observed that fewer CpGs acquired age-dependent methylation in users of aspirin and hormonal replacement therapy compared with nonusers, whereas more CpGs were affected in smokers and individuals with a body mass index > 25 compared with nonsmokers and less obese females. Half of the CpGs showing age-dependent methylation gain were hypermethylated in tissue of colorectal cancer. These loci gained methylation with a higher rate and were particularly susceptible to lifestyle exposure compared to age-only methylated CpGs. In addition, these CpGs were enriched for polycomb regions.  Finally, all effects were different according to the anatomic location along the colon. (more…)
Author Interviews, BMJ, Gender Differences, Mental Health Research / 01.07.2014

Dr. Flora I Matheson PhD Centre for Research on Inner City Health St. Michael's Hospital Toronto, ON, CanadaMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Flora I Matheson PhD Centre for Research on Inner City Health St. Michael's Hospital Toronto, ON, Canada MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Matheson:
  • We found that women were 10 per cent more likely to use mental health services than men.
  • And that within any 3-year period, women with physical illness used medical services for mental health treatment 6 months earlier than men.
(more…)
Author Interviews, Kidney Disease, Transplantation / 01.07.2014

Daniela P Ladner, MD, MPH, FACS Assistant Professor Transplant Surgery Department of Surgery, Division of Organ Transplantation Director Northwestern University Transplant Outcomes Research Collaborative (NUTORC) Comprehensive Transplant Center Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern UniversityMedicalResearch.com Interview with Daniela P Ladner, MD, MPH, FACS Assistant Professor Transplant Surgery Department of Surgery, Division of Organ Transplantation Director Northwestern University Transplant Outcomes Research Collaborative (NUTORC) Comprehensive Transplant Center Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Ladner: With the current kidney organ allocation system, there exists significant geographic disparity between the 58 Donor Services Areas (DSAs) in the US, which are distributed among 11 regions. This means that depending on where a patient lives it might take shorter or longer to receive a kidney organ for transplantation. Despite efforts, this has not improved over the course of 20 years and in most regions this has worsened. In 1991 and 1992 respectively, two states changed their kidney allocation system, such that kidneys would first be allocated with the DSA of procurement, then statewide, then regionally (which may include several states) and then nationally. Usually kidneys don’t get allocated statewide before regionally. The main finding of this study is that in those two states (FL, TN), where a minor change to the kidney allocation was put into place, there was significant reduction in the geographic disparity between their Donor Services Areas. In other comparable states (equal numbers of DSAs within the state) the geographic disparity did not improve and in many the geographic disparity worsened. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cost of Health Care, Global Health, Lancet / 01.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:  M Luca Lorenzoni OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Health Accounts, Asian Health and Social Policy Outreach ELS/Health Division MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: 
  • The United States is an outlier in the scenery of OECD as it ranks first for health care expenditure, but last for coverage.
  • The slowdown in US health care spending during the past decade brought the growth rate closer to that of other high-spending countries -Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland- at around 1%. Previously in 2002, the US's health expenditure growth was around 7%, much higher than the approximate 3% which was the average for the other countries examined in the study
  • Higher health-sector prices (e.g., hospital care and prescription drugs) are thought to be the main driver of expenditure differences between the US and other high-spending countries, and recent price dynamics largely explain declines in health expenditure growth. (more…)
Author Interviews, Diabetes, JAMA / 01.07.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:Sandeep Vijan, MD, MS Center for Clinical Management Research Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan Sandeep Vijan, MD, MS Center for Clinical Management Research Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Vijan: The main finding was that the burdens and side effects of intensive glycemic treatment significantly detract from the overall benefit of lower risks of diabetes complications, often to the point where the treatments cause more loss than gain in quality of life. It takes many (often 15-20) years to gain benefit from treatment, but the burdens begin right away and continue throughout treatment. By the time you might experience treatment benefit in terms of reduced complication risk, you've had a lot of years to have the downsides of treatment - which commonly include significant weight gain, low blood sugars, gastrointestinal symptoms, not to mention having to take multiple pills or injections on a daily basis. (more…)
Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Herpes Viruses, HIV / 01.07.2014

Connie Celum, MD, MPH Professor of Global Health and Medicine Director, International Clinical Research Center University of Washington Harborview Medical Center Seattle WA  98104MedicalResearch.com: Interview with Connie Celum, MD, MPH Professor of Global Health and Medicine Director, International Clinical Research Center University of Washington Harborview Medical Center Seattle WA  98104 MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Celum: We conducted a randomized, double blind study of daily oral tenofovir and tenofovir combined with emtricitabine (FTC) as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV among HIV serodiscordant couples (in which onepartner had HIV and the other partner did not) in Kenya and Uganda. Because of recent studies showing that tenofovir gel could reduce the chances of becoming HSV-2 infected, we studied the subset of HIV-uninfected partners who did not have HSV-2 and compared the rates who became HSV-2 infected during follow-up among those  who received oral pre-exposure prophylaxis versus those who received placebo.  We found that oral pre-exposure prophylaxis reduced HSV-2 acquisition by 30%. (more…)
Author Interviews, Diabetes, Genetic Research, Nature / 30.06.2014

Dr. Domenico Accili MD Professor of Medicine Department of Medicine Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York, New York 10032MedicalResearch.com: Interview with Dr. Domenico Accili MD Professor of Medicine Department of Medicine Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York, New York 10032 MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Accili: By switching off a single gene (foxo1), scientists at Columbia University’s Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center have converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating in principle that a drug could retrain cells inside a person’s GI tract to produce insulin. (more…)
Author Interviews, Rheumatology, Surgical Research / 30.06.2014

Daniel L. Riddle, PT, Ph.D., F.A.P.T.A. Otto D. Payton Professor Assistant department chair Department of Physical Therapy Virginia Commonwealth UniversityMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Daniel L. Riddle, PT, Ph.D., F.A.P.T.A. Otto D. Payton Professor Assistant department chair Department of Physical Therapy Virginia Commonwealth University MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Riddle: We used a classification system developed by researchers in Spain in the late 1990s and found that classifications of appropriate, inappropriate and inclusive ratings for persons undergoing knee replacement surgery were  44.0%, 21.7%, and 34.3%, respectively. We studied 175 persons who underwent unilateral total knee replacement in the Osteoarthritis Initiative study, an NIH and privately funded multi-year cohort study of persons with are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. These findings need to be considered cautiously because the classification system was developed more than 15 years ago and was designed to place greatest priority on persons with end stage knee osteoarthritis and severe pain and functional loss. (more…)
Author Interviews, Electronic Records / 30.06.2014

John D’Amore, President & CTO Diameter Health 1005 Boylston St #304 Newton MA 02461MedicalResearch.com Interview with John D’Amore, President & CTO Diameter Health 1005 Boylston St #304 Newton MA 02461   MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: We examined C-CDA (Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture) documents from electronic health records and other health information technology vendors. C-CDA documents are an XML format for transmitting patient data (e.g. problems, allergies, medications, results, vital signs, smoking status). Usage of C-CDA documents is required for Stage 2 of Meaningful Use in the United States. Overall, we were readily able to extract data elements from these documents, but we found many places where clinical content could be improved. This leads to policy recommendations on improving C-CDA production and consumption. Since thousands of hospitals and many more physicians will be required to exchange these documents in the coming year, we believe our findings to be important and timely for those seeking to improve care continuity and information exchange. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 30.06.2014

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Eddie Hulten, MD MPH FACC FSCCT Eddie Hulten, MD MPH FACC FSCCT and Ron Blankstein, MD FACCRon Blankstein, MD FACC Cardiovascular Imaging Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Brigham and Women’s Hospital Bethesda, MD Boston, MA MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Answer:  Although any medical test should be used to change management, the extent to which CCTA (Cardiac computed tomography angiography) findings are associated with medication changes (aspirin and lipid lowering) is not previously extensively studied. Thus, we conducted the largest and one of the longest follow up studies of preventive cardiovascular medications before and after coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).  We demonstrated that CCTA findings are associated with significant changes in preventive medications after CCTA. (more…)