Should Hormonal Therapy Be Extended Past Five Years After Estrogen+ Breast Cancer?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Hongchao Pan PhD Medical Research Council Population Health Research Unit Clinical Trial Service Unit & Epidemiological Studies Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health Oxford 

Dr Hongchao Pan

Dr Hongchao Pan PhD
Medical Research Council Population Health Research Unit
Clinical Trial Service Unit & Epidemiological Studies Unit
Nuffield Department of Population Health
Oxford

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We’ve known for a long time that recurrences can occur late in women with oestrogen receptor positive breast cancers. Our study aimed to assess how big the risk was for women who had taken endocrine treatment (tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor) for 5 years, which greatly reduces the risk of recurrence (by about a half during treatment and one third for the 5 years after stopping). We also wanted to find out what factors influenced the risk of recurrence, and whether some women had such a low risk that they could safely stop hormonal treatment after 5 years or, conversely, whether other women had a particularly high risk so it would make sense for them to keep on taking hormonal treatment.

What we found by following the progress of over 60,000 women who had stopped hormonal treatment at 5 years is that the risk of the cancer spreading stays about the same for the next 15 years. This risk is much higher for women whose breast cancer had spread to the nodes when first diagnosed but even for those with the best outlook (no spread to the lymph nodes and small tumours), there was a 10% chance of cancer spread over 15 years.

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Localized Prostate Cancer: Patient-Reported Outcomes after Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Professor Jenny Donovan  PhD   OBE FMedSci NIHR-SI AcSS FFPHM Director, NIHR CLAHRC West (National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for  Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West) at University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust Bristol, UK

Prof. Jenny Donovan

Professor Jenny Donovan  PhD
OBE FMedSci NIHR-SI AcSS FFPHM
Director, NIHR CLAHRC West
(National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for
Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West)
at University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust
Bristol, UK

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: PSA testing identifies many men with prostate cancer, but they do not all benefit from treatment. Surgery, radiation therapy and various programs of active monitoring/surveillance can be given as treatments for fit men with clinically localized prostate cancer. Previous studies have not compared the most commonly used treatments in terms of mortality, disease progression and patient-reported outcomes. In the ProtecT study, we used a comprehensive set of validated measures, completed by the men at baseline (before diagnosis), at six and 12 months and then annually for six years.

The main finding is that each treatment has a particular pattern of side-effects and recovery which needs to be balanced against the findings from the paper reporting the clinical outcomes (Hamdy et al).

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Cord Blood Transplant in Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Filippo Milano, MD, PhD Assistant Member, Clinical Research Division Associate Director Cord Blood Transplantation Cord Blood Program Assistant Professor, University of Washington Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Dr. Filippo Milano

Dr. Filippo Milano, MD, PhD
Assistant Member, Clinical Research Division
Associate Director Cord Blood Transplantation
Cord Blood Program
Assistant Professor, University of Washington
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: When first introduced, cord blood (CB) graft was used only as a last resort when no suitable conventional donor could be identified, largely due to the limiting cell doses available in a cord blood graft. A CB graft, however, is attractive due to the increased level of HLA disparity that can be tolerated, without increased risk of graft versus host disease, allowing nearly all patients to find such a donor.

The main intent of the study was to evaluate whether or not, at our Institution, cord blood SHOULD STILL BE considered only AS an alternative DONOR or IF instead outcomes were comparable to those obtained with more “conventional” types of transplants from matched and mismatched unrelated donors.

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Improved Survival with Combination Therapy for HER2- Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

 

Swain_SandraMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sandra M Swain, MD, FACP, FASCO
Medical Director, Washington Cancer Institute
MedStar Washington Hospital Center
Washington DC 20010

MedicalResearch: What take-home message would you like the general public to understand about this new analysis from the Cleopatra study?

Potential Key Message Options:

  • Updated results from the CLEOPATRA study showed that people treated with the combination of pertuzumab, trastuzumb and chemotherapy lived 15.7 months longer than those who received trastuzumab and chemotherapy alone (median survival of 56.5 months versus 40.8 months).
  • The survival improvement of nearly 16 months observed in CLEOPATRA is unprecedented among studies of metastatic breast cancer. This is the kind of survival improvement that those of us who treat breast cancer strive for, and this data will be incredibly meaningful to patients and their families.
  • Furthermore, the median survival of nearly five years observed in CLEOPATRA patients treated with the pertuzumab regimen is the longest ever observed in a clinical study of people with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, once one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer.
  • Patients who responded with shrinkage of their tumor had a response that was 8 months longer with the pertuzumab regimen compared to the trastuzumab and chemotherapy regimen.

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