Wisdom Teeth Extractions Can Lead to Opioid Addiction in Adolescents and Young Adults

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alan Schroeder MD Associate chief for research Division of pediatric hospital medicine Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Dr. Schroeder

Alan Schroeder MD
Associate Chief for Research
Division of pediatric hospital medicine
Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Third molar “wisdom teeth” extractions are one of the most common surgeries performed in adolescents and young adults, but an adequate appraisal of risks and benefits is lacking. Most patients who undergo this procedure are exposed to opioids post-operatively.

We demonstrate that, for privately-insured opioid-naïve patients 16-25 years of age, exposure to opioids from a dental provider is associated with persistent use at 90-365 days in 7% of patients and a subsequent diagnosis relating to abuse in 6% of patients. In contrast persistent use and abuse were significantly lower in control patients not exposed to dental opioids (0.1% and 0.4%, respectively). The median number of pills dispensed for the initial prescriptions was 20.

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Banned Stimulants Remain in Supplements, Despite FDA Efforts to Remove Them

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Pieter Cohen, M.D. Associate Professor of Medicine Cambridge Health Alliance Assistant Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School

Dr. Cohen

Pieter Cohen, M.D
Associate Professor of Medicine
Department of Medicine
Cambridge Health Alliance
Somerville MA 02143

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Since ephedra was banned from supplements in 2004, a variety of experimental stimulants have been introduced into sports and weight loss supplements as ephedra replacements.  The FDA has made some efforts to remove these emerging stimulants from supplements, but whether FDA action to remove these stimulants has it’s intended effect is not known.

We studied the effect of FDA action to remove four experimental stimulants from supplements.

We found that the FDA public notices did not work.  The stimulants remained in supplements even years after the FDA moved to remove them.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Given the regulatory paradigm under which supplements are sold, consumers cannot trust that they will be effective or safe.  Clinicians should understand that supplements might contain hidden ingredients that have potent drug-like effects and consider the effects of supplements when patients experience unexplained symptoms.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: One of the most concerning findings was that one stimulant appeared in the supplements analyzed only after the FDA warned that it was not permitted to be sold in supplements. Future studies should investigate whether FDA announcements regarding new experimental stimulants might have the unintended consequence of firms learning about the stimulant and then adding it to their supplements.

Disclosures: Dr Cohen was subject of a civil suit brought by Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals, a supplement company, regarding β-methylphenylethylamine;  The jury found in Dr Cohen’s favor. Dr Cohen has collaborated in research with NSF International and received research support from Consumers Union. No other disclosures were reported.

Citation:

Cohen PA, Wen A, Gerona R. Prohibited Stimulants in Dietary Supplements After Enforcement Action by the US Food and Drug Administration. JAMA Intern Med. Published online October 22, 2018. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.4846

Oct 23, 2018 @ 2:33 pm

 

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Most Older Americans Willing To Discuss ‘De-Prescribing’ Some Medications

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Emily Reeve BPharm(Hons) PhD NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Fellow Northern Clinical School University of Sydney

Dr. Reeve

Dr. Emily Reeve BPharm(Hons) PhD
NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Fellow
Northern Clinical School
University of Sydney

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Older adults commonly take multiple medications. All medications carry the potential for both benefit and harm. When a medication is started a decision has been made between the healthcare professional and the patient that the likely benefits outweigh the potential risks. But over time the potential benefits and harms can change. So, part of good clinical care is discontinuation of medications when the benefit no longer outweighs the risks – for example when it is no longer needed or high risk. This is called “deprescribing”.

Previously we knew that older adults could have mixed feelings about their medications, that is, they believe that all their medications are necessary but also feel that they are a burden to them. Qualitative research has explored this further, finding that there are a number of barriers and enablers to deprescribing from the patient perspective. For example, someone might have fear of deprescribing because they are worried that their symptoms may come back. But if they know that deprescribing is a trial and they will be monitored and supported by their physician or other healthcare professional they might be more open to deprescribing.

From the physician perspective, there were concerns that older adults and their families were resistant to deprescribing and so there was fear that discussing possible medication discontinuation could damage the doctor-patient relationship.

In this study of almost 2000 older adults in the United States, we found that over 90% were willing to stop one of more of their medications if their doctor said it was possible. Additionally, one third of participants wanted to reduce the number of medications that they were taking.  Continue reading